UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K


ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2005

Commission File Number 1-14667

WASHINGTON MUTUAL, INC.

( Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)


Washington

 

91-1653725

(State or other jurisdiction of

 

(I.R.S. Employer

incorporation or organization)

 

Identification Number)

1201 Third Avenue, Seattle, Washington

 

98101

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (206) 461-2000


Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class

 

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

 

Common Stock

 

New York Stock Exchange

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

Title of each class

 

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

 

Litigation Tracking Warrants™

 

NASDAQ

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes  x    N o .

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act. Yes  o     No  x .

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes  x     N o .

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  o .

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.  (Check one):   Large accelerated filer  x     Accelerated filer  o      Non-accelerated file o .

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes  o     No  x .

The aggregate market value of voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of June 30, 2005, based on the closing sale price as reported on the New York Stock Exchange:

Common Stock—$35,345,279,226 (1)

(1)   Does not include any value attributable to 6,000,000 shares held in escrow.

The number of shares outstanding of the issuer’s classes of common stock as of February 28, 2006:

Common Stock—992,254,791 (2)

(2)   Includes 6,000,000 shares held in escrow.

Documents Incorporated by Reference

Portions of the definitive proxy statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held April 18, 2006, are incorporated by reference into Part III.

 




WASHINGTON MUTUAL, INC.
2005 ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Page

PART I

 

1

Item 1.

Business

 

1

 

Overview

 

1

 

Available Information

 

2

 

Employees

 

2

 

Factors That May Affect Future Results

 

2

 

Environmental Regulation

 

6

 

Regulation and Supervision

 

6

 

Executive Officers

 

11

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

 

2

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments (1)

 

 –

Item 2.

Properties

 

13

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

 

13

Item 4.

Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders

 

14

PART II

 

14

Item 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

14

Item 6.

Selected Financial Data

 

24

Item 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations  

 

15

 

Controls and Procedures

 

15

 

Overview

 

16

 

Critical Accounting Estimates

 

17

 

Recently Issued Accounting Standards

 

22

 

Five-Year Summary of Selected Financial Data

 

24

 

Ratios and Other Supplemental Data

 

25

 

Earnings Performance from Continuing Operations

 

26

 

Review of Financial Condition

 

35

 

Operating Segments

 

38

 

Off-Balance Sheet Activities and Contractual Obligations

 

46

 

Capital Adequacy

 

48

 

Risk Management

 

49

 

Credit Risk Management

 

50

 

Liquidity Risk Management

 

64

 

Market Risk Management

 

66

 

Operational Risk Management

 

71

 

Maturity and Repricing Information

 

71

 

Tax Contingency

 

78

 

Goodwill Litigation

 

78

Item 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

 

66

Item 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

83

Item 9.

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure  

 

84

Item 9A.

Controls and Procedures

 

15

Item 9B.

Other Information

 

84

PART III

 

84

Item 10.

Directors and Executive Officers of the Registrant

 

84

Item 11.

Executive Compensation

 

84

Item 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

84

Item 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions

 

84

Item 14.

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

 

84

PART IV

 

85

Item 15.

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

 

85


(1)       Not applicable

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PART I

BUSINESS

Overview

With a history dating back to 1889, Washington Mutual, Inc. (together with its subsidiaries, “Washington Mutual,” or the “Company”) is a retailer of financial services to consumers and small businesses. Based on its consolidated assets at December 31, 2005 the Company was the seventh largest among all U.S.-based bank and thrift holding companies.

The Company’s earnings are primarily driven by lending to consumers and deposit taking activities which generate net interest income and by activities that generate noninterest income, including the sale and servicing of loans and providing fee-based services to its customers.

Washington Mutual strives to be the nation’s leading retailer of financial services for consumers and small businesses.  It plans to achieve this by building strong, profitable relationships with a broad spectrum of consumers and businesses. Expanding the Company’s retail banking franchise, diversifying its sources of income and achieving efficiencies in operations will be critical to future success.

Following the acquisition of the three largest California-based thrift institutions in the latter part of the 1990s, the Company continued to expand nationally by acquiring companies with strong retail banking franchises in Texas and the greater New York metropolitan area and by building out its branch network into select new markets. During this period, Washington Mutual developed and launched its award-winning and innovative retail banking stores that serve customers in an open, free-flowing retail environment. With the goal of combining its strengths as a deposit taker and portfolio lender with those of a mortgage banker, the Company also expanded its presence in the home loan origination and servicing businesses through acquisition. These mortgage banking acquisitions also served to further broaden the Company’s national presence.

Having created a viable branch presence in many of the largest metropolitan areas over the past decade, the Company shifted its retail banking strategy to focus on consumers in markets where the Company has both a home loan and retail banking presence. As compared to its branching strategy over the last decade, this current focus on building stores in its existing markets carries lower execution risk because it enables the Company to leverage both existing infrastructure and brand awareness. For more detail on the products and services offered by the Retail Banking and Financial Services Group, refer to Management’s Discussion and Analysis – “Operating Segments.”

The Company’s acquisition of Providian Financial Corporation (“Providian”) on October 1, 2005, has enabled the Company to offer credit cards to both new and existing customers, thereby creating and strengthening those relationships. For more detail on the products and services offered by the Card Services Group, refer to Management’s Discussion and Analysis – “Operating Segments.”

In the home loans business, the Company will continue to focus its attention on improving efficiency and productivity by consolidating technology platforms, enhancing customer service and leveraging the Company’s distribution network to cross sell additional products and services. For more detail on the products and services offered by the Home Loans Group, refer to Management’s Discussion and Analysis – “Operating Segments.”

Multi-family lending complements the Company’s expertise in residential real estate secured lending. During 2005, the Company successfully grew this business in its top 15 targeted metropolitan markets. These markets have stable demand, a large disparity between the cost of renting and the cost of home ownership, and households that typically rent for an extended period of time. Its target markets also have supply constraints such as geographic barriers, rent control and zoning restrictions. For more detail on the

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products and services offered by the Commercial Group, of which multi-family lending is the most significant part, refer to Management’s Discussion and Analysis – “Operating Segments.”

Available Information

Washington Mutual makes its annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and all amendments to such reports filed pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, available free of charge on or through its website located at www.wamu.com/ir as soon as reasonably practicable after their filing with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission.

The Company has implemented a Code of Ethics applicable to senior financial officers of the Company and a revised Company Code of Conduct applicable to all Company officers, employees and directors. The Code of Ethics provides fundamental ethical principles to which Company senior financial officers are expected to adhere. The Code of Conduct operates as a tool to help Washington Mutual officers, employees and directors understand and adhere to the high ethical standards required for employment by, or association with, the Company. Both the Code of Ethics and the Code of Conduct are available on the Company’s website at www.wamu.com/ir . Shareholders may also obtain written copies at no cost by writing the Company at 1201 Third Avenue, Seattle, Washington 98101, Attention: Investor Relations Department, WMT 2140, or by calling (206) 461-3187.

Employees

At December 31, 2005, Washington Mutual had 60,798 employees, compared with 52,579 at December 31, 2004 and 63,720 at December 31, 2003, which in 2003 included 2,346 employees related to the Company’s operations that have subsequently been discontinued. During 2005, the number of employees increased primarily due to the acquisition of Providian Financial Corporation, and the continuing expansion of the Company’s retail banking franchise. During 2004, the number of employees decreased primarily due to the Company’s cost containment initiative directed at reducing the fixed cost structure of the home loans business. The Company believes that it has been successful in attracting quality employees and that employee relations are good.

Factors That May Affect Future Results

The Company’s Form 10-K and other documents that it files with the Securities and Exchange Commission contain forward-looking statements. In addition, the Company’s senior management may make forward-looking statements orally to analysts, investors, the media and others. Forward-looking statements can be identified by the fact that they do not relate strictly to historical or current facts. They often include words such as “expects,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “seeks,” “estimates,” or words of similar meaning, or future or conditional verbs such as “will,” “would,” “should,” “could” or “may.”

Forward-looking statements provide management’s current expectations or predictions of future conditions, events or results. They may include projections of the Company’s revenues, income, earnings per share, capital expenditures, dividends, capital structure or other financial items, descriptions of management’s plans or objectives for future operations, products or services, or descriptions of assumptions underlying or relating to the foregoing. They are not guarantees of future performance. By their nature, forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties. These statements speak only as of the date they are made. Management does not undertake to update forward-looking statements to reflect the impact of circumstances or events that arise after the date the forward-looking statements were made. There are a number of factors, many of which are beyond management’s control or its ability to accurately forecast or predict their significance, which could cause actual conditions, events or results to differ materially from those described in the forward-looking statements.

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Significant among these factors are the following:

Volatile interest rates impact the mortgage banking business.

Changes in interest rates affect the mortgage banking business in complex and significant ways. Changes in interest rates can affect loan origination volumes, gain from mortgage loans and loan servicing fees, which are the principal components of revenue from sales and servicing of home mortgage loans. When mortgage rates decline, the Company generally expects loan volumes to increase as borrowers refinance, which leads to accelerated early payoffs of mortgage loans in its servicing portfolio. As a result, when mortgage rates decline, the fair value of the Company’s mortgage servicing rights (“MSR”) declines and gain from mortgage loans tend to increase. When mortgage rates rise, the Company generally expects loan volumes to decrease, which generally leads to reduced payoffs in its servicing portfolio. As a result, when mortgage rates rise, the fair value of the Company’s MSR increases and gain from mortgage loans decrease.

As part of its overall risk management activities, the Company seeks to mitigate changes in fair value of its MSR asset by purchasing and selling financial instruments, entering into interest rate contracts and forward commitments to purchase or sell mortgage-backed securities, and adjusting the mix and amount of such financial instruments or contracts to take into account the effects of different interest rate environments. The MSR asset and the mix of financial instruments used to mitigate changes in its fair value are not perfectly correlated. This imperfect correlation creates the potential for excess MSR risk management gains or losses during any period. The Company’s management must exercise judgment in selecting the amount, type and mix of financial instruments and contracts to mitigate changes in fair value of its MSR. The Company cannot assure that the amount, type and mix of financial instruments and contracts it selects will fully offset significant changes in the value of the MSR and the Company’s actions could negatively impact earnings. The Company’s reliance on these risk management instruments may be impacted by periods of illiquidity in the secondary markets, which could negatively impact the performance of the MSR risk management instruments. For further discussion of how interest rate risk, basis risk and prepayment risk are managed, refer to Management’s Discussion and Analysis – “Market Risk Management.”

Rising interest rates, unemployment and decreases in housing prices impact credit performance.

The Company’s assessment of its credit profile is based in part on management’s evaluation of economic trends that affect the real estate lending environment, which has been generally positive in recent years. With recent increases in short-term interest rates, however, the favorable economic environment may not persist. The Company continually monitors changes in the economy, particularly unemployment rates and housing prices. If unemployment were to rise and either a slowdown in housing price appreciation or outright declines in housing prices were to occur, borrowers might have difficulty repaying their loans. As a result, the Company could experience higher credit losses in its mortgage and home equity portfolios, which could adversely affect its earnings.

Risks related to the option adjustable-rate mortgage product.

The Company continually monitors the credit risk inherent in its option adjustable-rate mortgage product (“Option ARM”) portfolio and assesses the adequacy of its loan loss allowance in light of prevailing circumstances and the historical and current levels of negative amortization in its Option ARM portfolio. If credit risks associated with the Option ARM were to increase in severity, the Company’s earnings could be adversely affected. For further discussion of the Option ARM product, refer to Management’s Discussion and Analysis – “Credit Risk Management.”

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Risks related to subprime lending.

The Company remains committed to the subprime mortgage market and intends to increase the loan volume of its subprime mortgage business, Long Beach Mortgage Company, and to maintain the size of its purchased subprime home loan portfolio. A portion of the Company’s Card Services portfolio is made up of subprime credit card loans and Card Services may continue to originate a portion of its credit card loans to subprime borrowers. If unemployment were to rise or either a slowdown in housing price appreciation or outright declines in housing prices were to occur, subprime borrowers, who tend to have greater vulnerability to such changes than prime borrowers, may be unable to repay their loans and the credit performance of the Company’s subprime portfolios could suffer, with a potential adverse effect on earnings.

Risks related to the integration of the Card Services business.

The Company commenced its credit card operations as the result of the merger of Providian Financial Corporation into the Company in a transaction completed on October 1, 2005. The success of the merger will depend, in part, on the Company’s ability to realize the anticipated benefits from the merger, such as accelerated growth, enhanced customer relationships and product and earnings diversification. One of the key factors in realizing the anticipated benefits of the merger will be the Company’s ability to retain the management personnel from Providian who are leading the Card Services business. As the integration process for the Card Services business continues, it is possible that critical financial, growth or other objectives could be missed, key employees could be lost, or data, communications and other systems or operations could fail to be successfully combined. Integration efforts also divert management attention and resources away from other activities. Any failure to successfully integrate the Card Services business into the Company, loss of key management personnel or any significant delay or unanticipated diversion of resources in completing such integration, could adversely affect the Company’s performance.

Risks related to credit card operations.

Credit card lending brings with it certain risks and uncertainties. These include the composition and risk profile of the Company’s credit card portfolio and customers, and the Company’s ability to continue growing the Company’s credit card business. The success of the credit card business will also depend, in part, on the success of its product development, product rollout efforts and marketing initiatives, including the rollout of credit card products to the Company’s existing retail and mortgage loan customers, and its ability to continue to successfully target creditworthy customers. Recent disputes involving the Visa and MasterCard networks, including their membership standards and pricing structures, could also result in changes that would be adverse to the credit card business. Changes in interest rates also affect the credit card business, including the costs associated with funding the credit card portfolio and the valuation of retained interests related to credit card securitizations.

Changes in the regulation of financial services companies, housing government-sponsored enterprises and credit card lenders.

Proposals for further regulation of the financial services industry are continually being introduced in Congress. The agencies regulating the financial services industry also periodically adopt changes to their regulations. Proposals that are now receiving a great deal of attention include consumer protection initiatives relating to bank overdraft practices, security of customer information, marketing practices, the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, nontraditional loan products including Option ARMs, credit card lending practices and predatory lending. In addition, there continues to be a focus on reform of the housing government-sponsored enterprises (“GSEs”) including the federal home loan bank system. It is possible that one or more legislative proposals may be adopted or regulatory changes may be made that would have an adverse effect on the Company’s business. For further discussion of the regulation of financial services, see “Regulation and Supervision.”

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The Company faces competition from banking and nonbanking companies.

The Company operates in a highly competitive environment and expects competition to continue as financial services companies combine to produce larger companies that are able to offer a wide array of financial products and services at competitive prices. In addition, customer convenience and service capabilities, such as product lines offered and the accessibility of services are significant competitive factors.

The Company’s most direct competition for loans comes from commercial banks, other savings institutions, investment banking firms, national mortgage companies and other credit card lenders. Its most direct competition for deposits comes from commercial banks, other savings institutions and credit unions doing business in the Company’s market areas. As with all banking organizations, the Company also experiences competition from nonbanking sources, including mutual funds, corporate and government debt securities and other investment alternatives offered within and outside of its primary market areas. In addition, technological advances and the growth of e-commerce have made it possible for non-depository institutions to offer products and services that were traditionally offered only by banks. Many of these competitors have fewer regulatory constraints and some have lower cost structures.

The Company also faces competition for talent. Its success depends, in large part, on its ability to hire and keep key people. Competition for the best people in most businesses in which the Company engages can be intense. If the Company is unable to attract and retain talented people, its business could suffer.

General business and economic conditions, including movements in interest rates, the slope of the yield curve and the potential overextension of housing prices in certain geographic markets.

The Company’s business and earnings are sensitive to general business and economic conditions. These conditions include the slope of the yield curve, inflation, the money supply, the value of the U.S. dollar as compared to foreign currencies, fluctuations in both debt and equity capital markets, and the strength of the U.S. economy and the local economies in which the Company conducts business. Changes in these conditions may adversely affect its business and earnings. For example, when short-term interest rates rise, there is a lag period until adjustable-rate mortgages reprice. As a result, the Company may experience compression of its net interest margin with a commensurate adverse effect on earnings. Likewise, the Company’s earnings could also be adversely affected when a flat or inverted yield curve develops, as this may inhibit the Company’s ability to grow its adjustable-rate mortgage portfolio and may also cause margin compression. A prolonged economic downturn could increase the number of customers who become delinquent or default on their loans, or a rising interest rate environment could increase the negative amortization of Option ARM loans, which may eventually result in increased delinquencies and defaults. Rising interest rates could also decrease customer demand for loans. An increase in delinquencies or defaults could result in a higher level of charge-offs and provision for loan and lease losses, which could adversely affect earnings.

The Company’s business and earnings are significantly affected by the fiscal and monetary policies of the federal government and its agencies. The Company is particularly affected by the policies of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, which regulates the supply of money and credit in the United States. Federal Reserve System policies directly and indirectly influence the yield on the Company’s interest-earning assets and the cost of its interest-bearing liabilities. Changes in those policies are beyond the Company’s control and difficult to predict.

Negative public opinion impacts the Company’s reputation.

Reputational risk, meaning the risk to earnings and capital from negative public opinion, is inherent in the Company’s business. Negative public opinion can result from the actual or perceived manner in which the Company conducts its business activities, which include its sales and trading practices, its loan origination and servicing activities, its retail banking and credit card operations, its management of actual

5




or potential conflicts of interest and ethical issues, and its protection of confidential customer information. Negative public opinion can adversely affect the Company’s ability to keep and attract customers and can expose it to litigation and regulatory action. The Company takes steps to minimize reputation risk in the way it conducts its business activities and deals with its customers and communities.

Each of the factors discussed in the preceding paragraphs can significantly impact the Company’s businesses, operations, activities, condition and results in significant ways that are not described in the foregoing discussion and which are beyond the Company’s ability to anticipate or control, and could cause actual results to differ materially from the outcomes described in the forward-looking statements.

Environmental Regulation

The Company’s business and properties are subject to federal and state laws and regulations governing environmental matters, including the regulation of hazardous substances and wastes. For example, under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and similar state laws, owners and operators of contaminated properties may be liable for the costs of cleaning up hazardous substances without regard to whether such persons actually caused the contamination. Such laws may affect the Company both as an owner or former owner of properties used in or held for its business, and as a secured lender on property that is found to contain hazardous substances or wastes. The Company’s general policy is to obtain an environmental assessment prior to foreclosing on commercial property. The Company may elect not to foreclose on properties that contain such hazardous substances or wastes, thereby limiting, and in some instances precluding, the liquidation of such properties.

Regulation and Supervision

The following discussion describes elements of the extensive regulatory framework applicable to savings and loan holding companies as well as federal savings associations and provides some specific information relevant to Washington Mutual. This regulatory framework is primarily intended for the protection of depositors, federal deposit insurance funds and the banking system as a whole rather than for the protection of shareholders and creditors.

To the extent that this section describes statutory and regulatory provisions, it is qualified in its entirety by reference to those provisions. Those statutes and regulations, as well as related policies, are subject to change by Congress, state legislatures and federal and state regulators. Changes in statutes, regulations or regulatory policies applicable to the Company, including interpretation or implementation thereof, could have a material effect on the Company’s business.

General

Washington Mutual, Inc. is a Washington State corporation. It owns two federal savings associations as well as numerous nonbank subsidiaries. Washington Mutual, Inc. is a savings and loan holding company. As a savings and loan holding company, Washington Mutual, Inc. is subject to regulation by the Office of Thrift Supervision (the “OTS”).

The federal savings associations are subject to extensive regulation and examination by the OTS, their primary federal regulator, as well as the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”). On January 1, 2005, the Company’s state savings bank, the former Washington Mutual Bank merged into Washington Mutual Bank, FA, and ceased to exist; subsequently, Washington Mutual Bank, FA changed its name to Washington Mutual Bank (“WMB”). Consequently, the Company no longer owns a state savings bank that is subject to regulation and supervision by the Director of Financial Institutions of the State of Washington. Its nonbank financial subsidiaries are also subject to various federal and state laws and regulations.

Both of the Company’s banking subsidiaries are under the common control of Washington Mutual, Inc. and are insured by the FDIC. If an insured institution fails, claims for administrative expenses of the receiver and for deposits in U.S. branches (including claims of the FDIC as subrogee of the failed institution) have priority over the claims of general unsecured creditors. In addition, the FDIC has

6




authority to require either of the Company’s banking subsidiaries to reimburse it for losses it incurs in connection with the failure of the other banking subsidiary or with the FDIC’s provision of assistance to a Washington Mutual banking subsidiary that is in danger of failure.

Payment of Dividends

Washington Mutual, Inc. is a legal entity separate and distinct from its banking and nonbanking subsidiaries. Its principal sources of funds are cash dividends paid by those subsidiaries, investment income, and borrowings. Federal laws limit the amount of dividends or other capital distributions that a banking institution, such as the Company’s two federal savings associations, can pay. Each of its two banking subsidiaries has a policy to remain well-capitalized and, accordingly, would not pay dividends to the extent payment of the dividend would result in it not being well-capitalized. In addition, the two federal savings associations must file a notice with the OTS at least 30 days before they can pay dividends to their parent companies. Refer to Note 18 to the Consolidated Financial Statements – “Regulatory Capital Requirements and Dividend Restrictions” for a more detailed description of the limits on subsidiary bank dividends.

Capital Adequacy

Washington Mutual, Inc. is not currently subject to any regulatory capital requirements, but each of its subsidiary depository banking institutions is subject to OTS capital requirements. An institution’s capital category depends upon where its capital levels are in relation to relevant capital measures, which include a risk-based capital measure, a leverage ratio capital measure, a tangible equity ratio measure, and certain other factors.

Federal law and regulations establish minimum capital standards. Under such standards federal savings associations are required to maintain a leverage ratio of core capital to adjusted total assets of at least 4.00%, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of at least 4.00%, a total risk-based capital ratio of at least 8.00% and a tangible capital ratio of at least 1.50%. Federal law and regulations also establish five capital categories: well-capitalized, adequately capitalized, undercapitalized, significantly undercapitalized and critically undercapitalized. An institution is treated as well-capitalized if its ratio of total capital to risk-weighted assets is 10.00% or more, its ratio of Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets is 6.00% or more, its leverage ratio is 5.00% or more, and it is not subject to any federal supervisory order or directive to meet a specific capital level. In order to be adequately capitalized, an institution must have a total risk-based capital ratio of not less than 8.00%, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of not less than 4.00%, and (unless it is in the most highly-rated category) a leverage ratio of not less than 4.00%. Any institution that is neither well-capitalized nor adequately capitalized will be considered undercapitalized. Any institution with a tangible equity ratio of 2.00% or less will be considered critically undercapitalized.

As of December 31, 2005 both of the Company’s banking subsidiaries met all capital requirements to which they were subject and satisfied the requirements to be treated as well-capitalized institutions. See Note 18 to the Consolidated Financial Statements – “Regulatory Capital Requirements and Dividend Restrictions” for an analysis of the regulatory capital of the Company.

The Company continues to actively follow the progress of the U.S. banking agencies and the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision in developing a new set of regulatory risk-based capital requirements. The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision is a committee established by the central bank governors of certain industrialized nations, including the United States. The new requirements are commonly referred to as Basel II or The New Basel Capital Accord. The Company is participating in efforts to refine these standards to ensure that they measure risk as precisely as possible within the framework of The New Basel Capital Accord, and is working to ensure that its internal measurement of credit risk, market risk, and operational risk will comply with the new standards. The Company is also assessing the potential impacts The New Basel Capital Accord may have on its business practices as well as broader competitive effects within the industry.

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Holding Company Status and Acquisitions

Washington Mutual, Inc. is a multiple savings and loan holding company, as defined by federal law, because it owns more than one savings association. However, Washington Mutual, Inc. is regulated as a unitary savings and loan holding company because the OTS deems its federal savings associations to have been acquired in supervisory transactions. Therefore, it is exempt from certain restrictions that would otherwise apply under federal law to the activities and investments of a multiple savings and loan holding company. These restrictions will apply to Washington Mutual, Inc. if either of its banking institutions fail to meet a qualified thrift lender test established by federal law. As of December 31, 2005, the Company’s two banking subsidiaries were in compliance with qualified thrift lender standards.

Washington Mutual, Inc. may not acquire control of another savings association unless the OTS approves. Washington Mutual, Inc. may not be acquired by a company, other than a bank holding company, unless the OTS approves, or by an individual unless the OTS does not object after receiving notice. Washington Mutual, Inc. may not be acquired by a bank holding company unless the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “Federal Reserve”) approves. In any case, the public must have an opportunity to comment on the proposed acquisition, and the OTS or Federal Reserve must complete an application review. Without prior approval from the OTS, Washington Mutual, Inc. may not acquire more than 5% of the voting stock of any savings institution that is not already one of its subsidiaries.

The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act generally restricts any non-financial entity from acquiring Washington Mutual, Inc. unless such non-financial entity was, or had submitted an application to become, a savings and loan holding company as of May 4, 1999. Since Washington Mutual, Inc. was treated as a unitary savings and loan holding company prior to that date, Washington Mutual, Inc. may engage in non-financial activities and acquire non-financial subsidiaries.

Federal Home Loan Bank System

The primary purpose of the Federal Home Loan Banks (“FHLBs”) is to provide funding to their members for making housing loans as well as for affordable housing and community development lending. The FHLBs are generally able to make advances to their member institutions at interest rates that are lower than could otherwise be obtained by such institutions. The FHLB System consists of twelve regional FHLBs; each is federally chartered but privately owned by its member institutions. The Federal Housing Finance Board (“Finance Board”), a government agency, is generally responsible for regulating the FHLB System.

One of the Company’s federal savings associations, WMB, currently is a member of the San Francisco FHLB. The other federal savings association, Washington Mutual Bank fsb (“WMBfsb”), is a member of the Seattle FHLB.

In June 2004, the Finance Board issued a regulation that required each FHLB to register a class of its equity securities with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) by filing a Form 10 Registration Statement no later than June 30, 2005 and to ensure that the registration be declared effective no later than August 29, 2005. Upon becoming an SEC registrant, each FHLB is required to file quarterly, annual and supplemental financial disclosures with the Securities and Exchange Commission and to provide more public disclosure. The San Francisco FHLB filed a Registration Statement on June 30, 2005. The Seattle FHLB filed a Registration Statement with the SEC on June 30, 2005, but on August 26, 2005 filed to withdraw that Registration Statement and has not subsequently filed a new Registration Statement. The Seattle FHLB is reviewing certain issues related to derivatives accounting under Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (“Statement”) No. 133, Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities , as amended, and expects to re-file a registration statement with the SEC as soon as these issues have been resolved.

8




As a condition of membership and as a condition of obtaining advances, members of a FHLB are required to purchase and hold certain amounts of equity securities of that FHLB. Effective May 18, 2005, the Seattle FHLB has suspended payment of dividends on equity securities and suspended repurchases of most of its equity securities. The Company cannot predict when the Seattle FHLB will begin to pay dividends on or repurchase its equity securities.

Congress is considering proposals which would establish a new regulator for the FHLB system, as well as for other housing government-sponsored enterprises. Washington Mutual cannot predict at this time which, if any, of these proposals may be adopted or what effect they would have on the business of the Company.

Deposit Insurance

The FDIC insures the deposits of each of the Company’s banking subsidiaries to the applicable maximum in each institution, and such insurance is backed by the full faith and credit of the United States government. The FDIC administers two separate deposit insurance funds, the Bank Insurance Fund (the “BIF”) and the Savings Association Insurance Fund (the “SAIF”). The BIF is a deposit insurance fund for commercial banks and some federal and state-chartered savings banks. The SAIF is a deposit insurance fund for most savings associations. The Company’s federal savings associations are members of the SAIF, but a small portion of WMB’s deposits are insured through the BIF.

The FDIC has established a risk-based system for setting deposit insurance assessments. Under the risk-based assessment system, an institution’s insurance assessments vary according to the level of capital the institution holds and the degree to which it is the subject of supervisory concern. During 2005, the assessment rate for both SAIF and BIF deposits ranged from zero to 0.27% of assessable deposits. The Company’s banking subsidiaries qualified for the lowest rate on their deposits in 2005 and paid no deposit insurance assessments.

In February 2006, the President signed federal deposit insurance reform legislation. This legislation requires the FDIC to merge the BIF and the SAIF into a newly created Deposit Insurance Fund (“DIF”); increases the amount of deposit insurance coverage for retirement accounts; allows for deposit insurance coverage on individual accounts to be indexed for inflation starting in 2010; provides the FDIC more flexibility in setting and imposing deposit insurance assessments; and provides eligible institutions, such as the Company’s banking subsidiaries, credits on future assessments.

The merger of the BIF and the SAIF is required to take place in the first half of 2006. Once the two funds are merged, the Company’s banking subsidiaries will become members of the DIF. The Company’s banking subsidiaries will be subject to the new assessment and credit provisions once the FDIC, sometime before November 6, 2006, promulgates regulations implementing these provisions.

Affiliate Transaction Restrictions

Washington Mutual’s two banking subsidiaries are subject to, and comply with, the affiliate and insider transaction rules applicable to member banks of the Federal Reserve System as well as additional limitations imposed by the OTS. These provisions prohibit or limit a banking institution from extending credit to, or entering into certain transactions with, affiliates (such as Washington Mutual, Inc.), principal stockholders, directors and executive officers of the banking institution and its affiliates.

Federal Reserve, Consumer and Other Regulation

Numerous regulations promulgated by the Federal Reserve Board affect the business operations of the Company’s banking subsidiaries. These include regulations relating to equal credit opportunity, electronic fund transfers, collection of checks, truth in lending, truth in savings and availability of funds.

9




Under Federal Reserve Board regulations, both of the Company’s banking subsidiaries are required to maintain a reserve against their transaction accounts (primarily interest-bearing and noninterest-bearing checking accounts). Because reserves must generally be maintained in cash or in noninterest-bearing accounts, the effect of the reserve requirements is to increase an institution’s cost of funds.

The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act included provisions that give consumers new protections regarding the transfer and use of their nonpublic personal information by financial institutions. In addition, states are permitted under the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act to have their own privacy laws, which may offer greater protection to consumers than the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act. Numerous states in which the Company does business have enacted such laws.

The Bank Secrecy Act and the USA PATRIOT Act, which were enacted following the events of September 11, 2001, included numerous provisions designed to fight international money laundering and to block terrorist access to the U.S. financial system. Washington Mutual has established policies and procedures to ensure compliance with the provisions of the Bank Secrecy Act and the USA PATRIOT Act, and the impact of these Acts on the Company’s operations has not been material.

Community Reinvestment Act

The Community Reinvestment Act (“CRA”) requires that the Company’s banking subsidiaries ascertain and help meet the credit needs of the communities it serves, including low- to moderate-income neighborhoods, while maintaining safe and sound banking practices. The primary federal regulatory agency assigns one of four possible ratings to an institution’s CRA performance and is required to make public an institution’s rating and written evaluation. The four possible ratings of meeting community credit needs are outstanding, satisfactory, needs to improve, and substantial noncompliance. In the most recent examination results, the Company’s two federal associations received an “outstanding” CRA rating from the OTS. The Company maintains a CRA public file that is available for viewing. The file includes copies of its most recent CRA Public Evaluations, descriptions of its products and services, delivery outlet information, and public comments.

In September 2001, Washington Mutual announced a ten-year $375 billion community commitment, effective January 2002. This commitment replaced prior ones made by the Company and the companies it acquired. As of December 31, 2005, the Company had exceeded its yearly targets for lending in low- to moderate-income neighborhoods and underserved market areas .

Regulatory Enforcement

The OTS and the FDIC may take regulatory enforcement actions against any of their regulated institutions that do not operate in accordance with applicable regulations, policies and directives. Proceedings may be instituted against any banking institution, or any institution-affiliated party, such as a director, officer, employee, agent, or controlling person, who engages in unsafe and unsound practices, including violations of applicable laws and regulations. Each of the OTS and the FDIC has authority under various circumstances to appoint a receiver or conservator for an insured institution that it regulates, to issue cease and desist orders, to obtain injunctions restraining or prohibiting unsafe or unsound practices, to revalue assets and to require the establishment of reserves. The FDIC has additional authority to terminate insurance of accounts, after notice and hearing, upon a finding that the insured institution is or has engaged in any unsafe or unsound practice that has not been corrected, is operating in an unsafe or unsound condition, or has violated any applicable law, regulation, rule, or order of, or condition imposed by the FDIC.

Regulation of Nonbanking Affiliates

As broker-dealers registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission and as members of the NASD (National Association of Securities Dealers), Inc., the Company’s broker-dealer subsidiaries are

10




subject to various regulations and restrictions imposed by those entities, as well as by various state authorities. As a registered investment advisor, WM Advisors is subject to various federal and state securities regulations and restrictions. The Company’s subprime mortgage subsidiary, Long Beach Mortgage Company, is subject to various federal and state laws and regulations, including those relating to truth-in-lending, equal credit opportunity, fair credit reporting, real estate settlement procedures, debt collection practices and usury. The Company’s insurance subsidiaries are subject to regulation by various state insurance regulators. Some of the Company’s subsidiaries are subject to various state licensing and examination requirements.

Executive Officers

The following table sets forth certain information regarding the executive officers of Washington Mutual:

Executive Officers

 

 

 

Age

 

Capacity in Which Served

 

 

 

Employee of
Company
Since

 

Kerry K. Killinger

 

 

56

 

 

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

 

 

1983

 

 

Thomas W. Casey

 

 

43

 

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

 

 

2002

 

 

Ronald J. Cathcart

 

 

53

 

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Enterprise Risk Officer

 

 

2005

 

 

Fay L. Chapman

 

 

59

 

 

Senior Executive Vice President and General Counsel

 

 

1997

 

 

Daryl D. David

 

 

51

 

 

Executive Vice President, Human Resources

 

 

2000

 

 

Debora D. Horvath

 

 

51

 

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer

 

 

2004

 

 

Kenneth E. Kido

 

 

48

 

 

Executive Vice President and Acting President, Retail
Banking

 

 

2001

 

 

J. Benson Porter

 

 

40

 

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer

 

 

1996

 

 

Stephen J. Rotella

 

 

52

 

 

President and Chief Operating Officer

 

 

2005

 

 

David C. Schneider

 

 

40

 

 

Executive Vice President and President, Home Loans

 

 

2005

 

 

John F. Woods

 

 

41

 

 

Senior Vice President and Controller

 

 

2005

 

 

 

Mr. Killinger established the Executive Committee in 1990 to facilitate and coordinate decision making and communication among the most senior executive officers of the Company who, as a committee, determine the Company’s strategic direction. The executive officers serving on this committee are indicated below.

Mr. Killinger is Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Washington Mutual. He was named President and a Director in 1988, Chief Executive Officer in 1990 and Chairman in 1991. He served as President through 2004. He has been a member of the Executive Committee since its formation in 1990.

Mr. Casey is Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and a member of the Executive Committee of Washington Mutual. He oversees all aspects of Washington Mutual’s corporate finance, strategic planning and investor relations functions. Prior to joining Washington Mutual, Mr. Casey was with GE Capital Corp. from 1992 through 2002 where he held advising, controllership and analyst positions prior to becoming a Vice President of GE and Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of GE Financial Assurance in 1999.

Mr. Cathcart joined the Company in December 2005 as Executive Vice President and Chief Enterprise Risk Officer and became a member of the Executive Committee at that time. He is responsible for overseeing the credit, market and operational risk functions for the company. Prior to joining Washington Mutual, he served as Executive Vice President of Retail Risk Management at the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (“CIBC”) from 2002 to 2005. Prior to joining CIBC, Mr. Cathcart served in a variety of risk management positions at Bank One from 1999 to 2002, including Executive Vice President, Retail Risk Management.

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Ms. Chapman has served as the Company’s General Counsel and Senior Executive Vice President since 1999. She became Executive Vice President, General Counsel and a member of the Executive Committee in 1997. Prior to joining Washington Mutual, she was a partner at the Seattle law firm of Foster Pepper & Shefelman PLLC from 1979 to 1997.

Mr. David joined Washington Mutual in 2000 as Executive Vice President, Human Resources. He is responsible for talent acquisition, organizational capabilities, leadership development and rewards and benefits. Mr. David became a member of the Executive Committee in 2001. Previously he served as Vice President of Strategic Growth and Human Resources at Amazon.com from 1999 to 2000. He also served in executive human resource positions with Sanga International, Magnetek, Inc., and Allied Signal from 1992 to 1999.

Ms. Horvath joined Washington Mutual in 2004 as Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer and became a member of the Executive Committee at that time. She is responsible for overseeing the Company’s enterprise-wide technology efforts. Prior to joining Washington Mutual, she served as Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer with GE Capital – Great Northern Annuity, GE Financial Assurance and GE Insurance from 1993 to 2004.

Mr. Kido is Executive Vice President and Acting President, Retail Banking. He manages all aspects of consumer lending and deposit product management and operations and is responsible for the management and operations of over 2,100 financial centers in 16 states including the Company’s small business operations. He became a member of the Executive Committee in 2005. Mr. Kido joined Washington Mutual in July 2001 after spending 24 years with Bank of America, most recently as head of their Consumer Card Division.

Mr. Porter has served as Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer since 2004. In this role, he oversees teams that provide company-wide support for sourcing and purchasing, corporate communications, operational excellence initiatives, corporate property management, community affairs, the enterprise-wide call centers and community lending and investment. Mr. Porter joined Washington Mutual in 1996 and became a member of the Executive Committee in 2004.

Mr. Rotella became President and Chief Operating Officer of Washington Mutual in January 2005 and became a member of the Executive Committee at that time. He is responsible for overseeing the Company’s retail, home loans, credit card and commercial lines of business, the technology group and marketing, as well as day-to-day corporate administration. Prior to joining Washington Mutual, he was an Executive Vice President with JPMorgan Chase and served on its executive committee from 2001 to 2004. In addition, he was the Chief Executive Officer of Chase Home Finance from 2001 to 2004 and its Chief Operating Officer from 1998 to 2001.

Mr. Schneider joined the Company in July 2005 as Executive Vice President and President, Home Loans and became a member of the Executive Committee at that time. He oversees all aspects of the Company’s home loans business including prime mortgage lending, mortgage banker finance, Long Beach Mortgage Company and specialty mortgage finance. Prior to joining Washington Mutual, Mr. Schneider served as President and Chief Operating Officer of CitiMortgage, Inc. Prior to joining CitiMortgage in April 2001, he served as Executive Vice President of Retail Banking for Old Kent Financial Corporation from 1998 to 2001.

Mr. Woods joined the Company in December 2005 as Senior Vice President and Controller. He serves as the Company’s principal accounting officer. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Woods served in various positions at Freddie Mac including Senior Vice President, Principal Accounting Officer and Corporate Controller. Prior to joining Freddie Mac in 2002, Mr. Woods was a partner at Arthur Andersen in its financial services audit and consulting practices.

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Properties

The Company’s primary executive and business segment headquarters are located at 1201 Third Avenue, Seattle, Washington 98101. The Company leases approximately 400,000 square feet at this location and an additional 700,000 square feet in other downtown Seattle locations for administrative functions.

The Company, in a joint venture with the Seattle Art Museum, is constructing a new headquarters building in downtown Seattle. On completion of the building, the Company will own approximately 900,000 square feet and will lease from the Seattle Art Museum an additional 250,000 square feet for a period of up to 25 years. The lessor has the right to cancel the lease, in whole or in part, at any time after the tenth year of the lease. Occupancy and the term of the lease are expected to commence concurrently in 2006; accordingly, certain of the leases in downtown Seattle locations will not be renewed when their terms expire, as the majority of those occupants will move to the new headquarters building.

As of December 31, 2005, the Company or its subsidiaries owned or leased property in 38 states for 2,140 retail banking stores, 487 lending stores and centers and 323 administrative and other offices. Administrative facilities involve the ownership or leasing of approximately 2.4 million square feet in California, 1.2 million square feet in Texas, 900,000 square feet in Florida and 500,000 square feet in Illinois.

Legal Proceedings

In the ordinary course of business, the Company and its subsidiaries are routinely defendants in or parties to a number of pending and threatened legal actions and proceedings, including actions brought on behalf of various classes of claimants. In certain of these actions and proceedings, claims for substantial monetary damages are asserted against the Company and its subsidiaries. Certain of these actions and proceedings are based on alleged violations of consumer protection, banking and other laws.

In July 2004, the Company and a number of its officers were named as defendants in a series of cases alleging violations of Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”), Rule 10b-5 thereunder and Section 20(a) of the Exchange Act. By stipulation, those cases were consolidated into a single case currently pending in the U.S. District Court for the Western Division of Washington. South Ferry L.P. #2 v. Killinger et al. , No. CV04-1599C (W.D. Wa., Filed Jul. 19, 2004) (the “Securities Action”). In brief, the plaintiffs in the Securities Action allege, on behalf of a putative class of purchasers of Washington Mutual, Inc., securities from April 15, 2003, through June 28, 2004, that in various public statements the defendants purportedly made misrepresentations and failed to disclose material facts concerning, among other things, alleged internal systems problems and hedging issues.

The defendants moved to dismiss the Securities Action on May 17, 2005. After briefing, but without oral argument, the Court on November 17, 2005, denied the motion in principal part; however, the Court dismissed the claims against certain of the individual defendants, dismissed claims pleaded on behalf of sellers of put options on Washington Mutual stock, and concluded that the plaintiffs could not rely on supposed violations of accounting standards to support their claims. The remaining defendants subsequently moved for reconsideration or, in the alternative, certification of the opinion for interlocutory appeal to the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. The District Court denied the motion for reconsideration, but on March 6, 2006, granted the motion for certification. The defendants will now move the Ninth Circuit to have the appellate court accept the case for interlocutory review of the District Court’s original order denying the motion to dismiss. The District Court stayed further proceedings before it pending the outcome of the defendant’s motion to the Ninth Circuit.

On November 29, 2005, 12 days after the Court denied the motion to dismiss the Securities Action, a separate plaintiff filed in Washington State Superior Court a derivative shareholder lawsuit purportedly asserting claims for the benefit of the Company. The case was removed to federal court, where it is now

13




pending. Lee Family Investments, by and through its Trustee W.B. Lee, Derivatively and on behalf of Nominal Defendant Washington Mutual, Inc. v. Killinger et al. , No. CV05-2121C (W.D. Wa., Filed Nov. 29, 2005) (the “Derivative Action”). The defendants in the Derivative Action include those individuals remaining as defendants in the Securities Action, as well as those of the Company’s current independent directors who were directors at any time from April 15, 2003, through June 2004. The allegations in the Derivative Action mirror those in the Securities Action, but seek relief based on claims that the independent director defendants failed properly to respond to the misrepresentations alleged in the Securities Action and that the filing of that action has caused the Company to expend sums to defend itself and the individual defendants and to conduct internal investigations related to the underlying claims. The defendants have not yet responded to the complaint in the Derivative Action.

See Note 14 to the Consolidated Financial Statements – “Commitments, Guarantees and Contingencies” for a further discussion of pending and threatened litigation action and proceedings against the Company.

Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders

None.

PART II

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Washington Mutual’s common stock trades on The New York Stock Exchange under the symbol WM. As of February 28, 2006, there were 992,254,791 shares issued and outstanding (including 6 million shares held in escrow) held by 61,025 shareholders of record. The information regarding high and low quarterly sales prices of the Company’s common stock, and the quarterly cash dividends declared thereon, is set forth in this Form 10-K in the “Quarterly Results of Operations” table included under Supplementary Data on page 175 and is expressly incorporated herein by reference.

The table below represents share repurchases made by the Company for the quarter ended December 31, 2005. Management may engage in future share repurchases as liquidity conditions permit and market conditions warrant.

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

 

 

Total
Number
of Shares
(or Units)
Purchased
(1)

 

Average
Price Paid
per Share
(or Unit)

 

Total
Number of
Shares (or Units)
Purchased as
Part of Publicly
Announced Plans
or Programs
(2)

 

Maximum
Number (or
Approximate
Dollar Value) of
Shares (or Units)
that May Yet
Be Purchased
Under the Plans
or Programs

 

October 1, 2005 to October 31, 2005

 

 

18,932,665

 

 

 

$

42.23

 

 

 

18,932,000

 

 

 

84,500,000

 

 

November 1, 2005 to November 30, 2005

 

 

300,386

 

 

 

44.61

 

 

 

–  

 

 

 

84,500,000

 

 

December 1, 2005 to December 31, 2005

 

 

711

 

 

 

43.63

 

 

 

 

 

 

84,500,000

 

 

Total

 

 

19,233,762

 

 

 

42.26

 

 

 

18,932,000

 

 

 

84,500,000

 

 


(1)                  In addition to shares repurchased pursuant to the Company’s publicly announced repurchase program, this column includes shares acquired under equity compensation arrangements with the Company’s employees and directors.

(2)                  Effective July 15, 2003, the Company adopted a share repurchase program approved by the Board of Directors (the “2003 Program”). Under the 2003 Program, the Company was authorized to repurchase up to 100 million shares of its common stock, as conditions warranted. On October 18, 2005, the Company discontinued the 2003 Program and adopted a new share repurchase program approved by the Board of Directors (the “2005 Program”). The Company had repurchased 64,842,794 shares under the 2003 Program, of which 3,432,000 were repurchased during the fourth quarter of 2005, prior to its discontinuance. Under the 2005 Program, the Company is authorized to repurchase up to 100 million shares of its common stock as conditions warrant and had repurchased 15,500,000 shares under this program as of December 31, 2005.

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MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Acquisition of Providian Financial Corporation

On October 1, 2005 the Company completed its acquisition of Providian Financial Corporation in a stock and cash merger valued at approximately $5.8 billion. For each share of Providian common stock, Providian stockholders received .4005 shares of Washington Mutual common stock and $2.00 in cash. As a result of this acquisition, the Company now ranks as the eighth largest among all credit card issuers. The card services activities of the Company are conducted through a new operating segment entitled Washington Mutual Card Services (“Card Services”).

Subsequent Accounting Revision

Subsequent to furnishing the Company’s fourth quarter 2005 earnings release on Form 8-K on January 18, 2006, the Company made a reclassification change to the Consolidated Statements of Income, included within this Annual Report on Form 10-K, with regard to the presentation of credit card receivables that were sold in the fourth quarter of 2005. This change was made to conform Providian’s historical accounting practice for such sales to Washington Mutual’s accounting policy for transactions of this nature. When loans that were originally recorded in the Company’s held for investment portfolio are subsequently sold, the Company’s policy results in the reduction of their cost basis by the amount of the loan loss allowance allocable to the sold loans. Providian’s practice, by contrast, did not consider the allocable allowance when computing gain on credit card sales. Providian’s historical accounting practice was applied for reporting purposes in the Company’s Form 8-K dated January 18, 2006. This change resulted in an increase of $96 million to the fourth quarter credit card gain on sale (which is reported in the Consolidated Statements of Income under the noninterest income caption “Revenue from sales and servicing of consumer loans”) and a corresponding increase to the provision for loan and lease losses. This change had no effect on net income.

Discontinued Operations

In January 2004, the Company sold its subsidiary, Washington Mutual Finance Corporation, for approximately $1.30 billion in cash. Accordingly, this former subsidiary is presented in this report as a discontinued operation with its results of operations and cash flows segregated from the Company’s results of continuing operations for the affected periods presented on the Consolidated Statements of Income, Cash Flows and Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements as well as the tables presented herein, unless otherwise noted.

Controls and Procedures

Disclosure Controls and Procedures

The Company’s management, with the participation of the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, has evaluated the effectiveness of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based on such evaluation, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that, as of the end of such period, the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are effective in recording, processing, summarizing and reporting, on a timely basis, information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that it files or submits under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

Management reviews and evaluates the design and effectiveness of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures on an ongoing basis, which may result in the discovery of deficiencies, and improves its controls and procedures over time, correcting any deficiencies that may have been discovered.

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Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

Management reviews and evaluates the design and effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting on an ongoing basis, which may result in the discovery of deficiencies, some of which may be significant, and changes its internal control over financial reporting as needed to maintain their effectiveness, correcting any deficiencies, as needed, in order to ensure the continued effectiveness of the Company’s internal controls. The Company’s internal control over financial reporting changed when the Company acquired Providian Financial Corporation on October 1, 2005, to include the key controls inherent within the credit card operations it acquired. Except for this change, there have not been any other changes in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting during the fourth quarter of 2005 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. For management’s assessment of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting, refer to Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting on page 88.

Overview

Net income for 2005 was $3.43 billion, or $3.73 per diluted share, an increase from $2.88 billion, or $3.26 per diluted share for 2004. Included in earnings for 2004 was an after-tax gain of $399 million, or 45 cents per diluted share, from the first quarter sale and disposal of the Company’s former consumer finance subsidiary, Washington Mutual Finance Corporation.

Net interest income was $7.89 billion in 2005, compared with $7.12 billion in 2004. The increase was primarily due to growth in the average total loan portfolio and loans held for sale, which collectively increased by 16% during 2005. Largely offsetting the growth in interest-earning assets was contraction in the net interest margin. The net interest margin in 2005 was 2.67%, a decline of 15 basis points from 2004. The decrease in the net interest margin was due to an increase in the cost of the Company’s interest-bearing liabilities, which was driven by continuous increases in short-term interest rates since June of 2004. As the U.S. economy rebounded in 2004 and 2005 from the downturn in the early part of the decade, the Federal Reserve Board initiated a series of 25 basis point increases in the targeted federal funds rate. This benchmark interest rate has increased from 1.00% in the second quarter of 2004 to 4.50% at the end of January 2006. These increases gradually shifted the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy from a position that provided a stimulus effect on the domestic economy towards a more neutral fiscal policy that reduces the potential threat of inflation. Although the Federal Reserve has not stated that a 4.50% rate represents a position of neutrality, it did recently imply, for the first time since the current series of increases began, that the current rate is no longer at a level that would stimulate economic expansion. Accordingly, the current rate appears to be close to entering the Federal Reserve’s target zone for fiscal policy neutrality. Until rates move into that zone, additional increases are likely. Since the Company’s adjustable-rate home loans and securities reprice to current market rates more slowly than its wholesale borrowing sources, the Company expects the net interest margin will continue to be pressured until the federal funds rate stabilizes.

Partially mitigating the disparity in repricing speeds is the growth in home equity line of credit balances, which have repricing frequencies that are more closely aligned with the faster repricing behavior of the Company’s wholesale borrowings. The average balance of home equity lines of credit was $36.14 billion in 2005, an increase of $9.71 billion, or 37% from 2004, while the yield on this portfolio increased from 4.23% to 5.85%. Additionally, the margin benefited from the fourth quarter addition of the credit card portfolio acquired from Providian Financial Corporation and from the partial restructuring of the available-for-sale securities portfolio in the first quarter of 2005, which resulted in the sale of approximately $3 billion of lower-yielding debt securities and the subsequent purchase of securities with comparatively higher yields.

Noninterest income in 2005 was $5.74 billion, an increase of $1.13 billion from 2004. The increase was largely due to consumer loan sales and servicing income of $413 million and credit card fee income of $139

16




million, all of which resulted from the Company’s new Card Services segment, and improved revenues from the Company’s home loan banking operations. At December 31, 2005, total managed credit card receivables were approximately $19.96 billion, an increase of nearly $700 million during the fourth quarter of 2005. A significant portion of this increase was the result of cross-selling credit card products to the Company’s retail banking customer base.

Revenue from sales and servicing of home mortgage loans, including the effects of all MSR risk management instruments, was $1.79 billion in 2005, an increase from $1.47 billion in 2004. The increase was primarily due to higher levels of gains from the sale of mortgage loans and originated mortgage backed securities, net of gains and losses from risk management instruments. This increase was fostered by the strength of the U.S. housing market, which fueled strong customer demand for fixed-rate mortgages and the Company’s Option ARM portfolio. In particular, the sustained liquidity of the Option ARM product in the secondary market enabled the Company to sell approximately $48.13 billion of Option ARM volume during 2005, compared with $14.12 billion in 2004. The Company also sells substantially all of its fixed-rate and medium-term adjustable-rate home loan volume.

As the yield curve continued to flatten throughout 2005 (and ended the year virtually flat), the interest rate differential between short-term adjustable-rate loans, such as the Option ARM, and fixed-rate loans continued to compress, which increases the desirability of fixed-rate loan products. Accordingly, short-term adjustable-rate loans, as a percentage of total home loan volume, declined from 39% in the fourth quarter of 2004 to 26% in the final quarter of 2005, while fixed-rate loans, as a percentage of total home loan volume, increased from 32% to 44% during the same periods.

The Company recorded a provision for loan and lease losses of $316 million in 2005, compared with a provision of $209 million in 2004. Reflecting the higher risk profile associated with the unsecured, higher-yielding lending activities conducted by Card Services, the 2005 provision included $195 million that was related to the credit card portfolio in the fourth quarter. A relatively benign credit risk environment for the Company’s real estate secured lending activities existed through most of 2005, reflecting the positive effects of a low mortgage interest rate environment, stable or appreciating housing prices in most of the Company’s markets, and a relatively low national unemployment rate.

Depositor and other retail banking fees were $2.19 billion in 2005, a 10% increase from 2004. The growth was driven by strong increases in the number of retail checking accounts as well as an increase in debit card interchange and ATM-related income. The number of retail checking accounts at December 31, 2005 totaled approximately 9.9 million, compared with approximately 9.0 million at December 31, 2004, an increase of over 900,000 accounts. Total retail transaction accounts, which include checking, money market and savings accounts, increased by nearly 1.5 million in 2005.

The Company continues to grow its retail banking business by opening new stores and enhancing its products and services. The Company opened 210 new stores in 2005, and has established a target of opening between 150 and 200 new stores within its existing markets during 2006. Although the Company expects total noninterest expense to be higher in 2006 as a result of the continuing expansion of the retail banking franchise and the full-year effect of absorbing the Card Services Group into the Company’s cost structure, those efforts will also be accompanied by rigorous expense management discipline and the implementation of operational efficiencies and productivity improvements, including the redeployment of certain back-office support operations to more cost-effective labor markets and the consolidation of other administrative support facilities.

Critical Accounting Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in accordance with the accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make a number of judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amount of assets, liabilities, income and expenses in the

17




Consolidated Financial Statements. Various elements of the Company’s accounting policies, by their nature, involve the application of highly sensitive and judgmental estimates and assumptions. Some of these policies and estimates relate to matters that are highly complex and contain inherent uncertainties. In some instances, different estimates and assumptions could have been reasonably used to supplant those that were applied. Had those alternative estimates and assumptions been applied, the differences that may result from those alternative applications could have a material effect on the financial statements.

The Company has identified three accounting estimates that, due to the judgments and assumptions inherent in those estimates, and the potential sensitivity of its Consolidated Financial Statements to those judgments and assumptions, are critical to an understanding of its Consolidated Financial Statements. These estimates are: the fair value of certain financial instruments and other assets; derivatives and hedging activities; and the allowance for loan and lease losses and contingent credit risk liabilities.

Management has discussed the development and selection of these critical accounting estimates with the Company’s Audit Committee. The Company believes that the judgments, estimates and assumptions used in the preparation of its Consolidated Financial Statements are appropriate given the facts and circumstances as of December 31, 2005. These judgments, estimates and assumptions are described in greater detail in subsequent sections of Management’s Discussion and Analysis and in Note 1 to the Consolidated Financial Statements – “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies.”

The discussion below presents information about the nature of the Company’s critical accounting estimates:

Fair Value of Certain Financial Instruments and Other Assets

A portion of the Company’s assets are carried at fair value, including: certain retained interests from securitization activities (which are classified as trading assets), available-for-sale securities and derivatives. Mortgage servicing rights and loans held for sale are recorded at the lower of carrying value or fair value. For those that qualify as hedged items under fair value hedge accounting, their changes in fair value are recognized in earnings and offset the changes in fair value of derivatives used as hedge accounting instruments.

Fair value is defined as the amount at which a financial instrument could be exchanged in a hypothetical transaction between willing, unrelated parties, other than in a forced or liquidation sale. Generally, for assets that are reported at fair value, the Company uses quoted market prices or internal valuation models that utilize market data inputs and other assumptions, such as loan prepayment speeds, forward interest rate yield curves, market volatilities and pricing spreads to determine their fair values. The degree of management judgment involved in determining the fair value of a financial instrument or other asset is dependent upon the availability of quoted market prices or observable market value inputs. For financial instruments that are actively traded in the marketplace or whose values are based on readily available market value data, little, if any, subjectivity is applied when determining the instrument’s fair value. When observable market prices and data do not exist, significant management judgment is necessary to estimate fair value. In those cases, small changes in assumptions could result in significant changes in valuation.

The following financial instruments and other assets require the Company’s most complex judgments and assumptions when estimating fair value:

Mortgage Servicing Rights and Certain Other Retained Interests in Securitizations

MSRs and certain other retained interests from securitization activities do not trade in an active, open market with readily quoted prices. Although sales do occur from time to time, the terms of such sales are generally not readily available. Consequently, the Company estimates the fair value of MSRs and certain other retained interests in securitization activities utilizing internal discounted cash flow models.

18




For MSRs, the discounted cash flow model calculates the present value of the expected future net cash flows of the servicing portfolio based on various assumptions, such as estimated future servicing costs, expected servicing portfolio prepayment speeds and discount rates that are commensurate with the risk profile of the serviced assets. This model is highly sensitive to changes in certain assumptions. Different anticipated prepayment speeds, in particular, can result in substantial changes in the estimated fair value of MSR. If actual prepayment experience differs from the anticipated rates used in the Company’s model, this difference would likely result in a material change in MSR fair value. While the Company’s model estimates a value, the specific value used is based on a variety of market-based factors, such as documented observable data and anticipated changes in prepayment speeds. The reasonableness of management’s assumptions about these factors is evaluated through quarterly independent broker surveys. Independent appraisals of the fair value of the servicing portfolio are obtained periodically, but not less frequently than quarterly, and are used by management to evaluate the reasonableness of the fair value conclusions. Changes in MSR value are reported in the Consolidated Statements of Income under the noninterest income caption “Revenue from sales and servicing of home mortgage loans.”  Additional discussion regarding the estimation of MSR fair value, including limitations to the MSR fair value measurement process, are described in the subsequent section of Management’s Discussion and Analysis – “Earnings Performance.” Key economic assumptions and the sensitivity of MSR fair value to immediate changes in those assumptions are described in Note 6 to the Consolidated Financial Statements – “Mortgage Banking Activities.”

For other retained interests in securitization activities (such as interest-only strips and residual interests) the discounted cash flow model used in determining fair value utilizes projections of expected cash flows that are greatly influenced by anticipated prepayment speeds and, in some cases, expected net credit losses or finance charges related to the securitized assets. Changes in those and other assumptions used could have a significant effect on the valuation of these retained interests. Changes in the value of other retained interests in securitization activities are reported in the Consolidated Statements of Income under the noninterest income caption “Trading assets income (loss)” and on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition as “Trading assets.”

Loans held for sale

The fair value of loans designated as held-for-sale is generally based on observable market prices of securities that are similar to those that will be collateralized by such loans. If market prices are not readily available, fair value is based on a discounted cash flow model, which takes into account prepayment factors and the degree of credit risk associated with the loans and the estimated effects of changes in market interest rates. When the estimated fair value of loans held for sale is lower than their carrying value or, for those that achieve fair value hedge accounting under Statement No. 133, as amended, when the estimated fair value is greater than their carrying value, a valuation adjustment that accounts for this difference is reported on the Consolidated Statements of Income as a component within the noninterest income caption “Revenue from sales and servicing of home mortgage loans.”  Valuation adjustments for consumer loans held for sale are recorded under the noninterest income caption “Revenue from sales and servicing of consumer loans.”

Goodwill Impairment

Under FASB Statement No. 142, Goodwill and Other Intangibles, goodwill must be allocated to reporting units and tested for impairment. The Company tests goodwill for impairment at least annually or more frequently if events or circumstances, such as adverse changes in the business, indicate that there may be justification for conducting an interim test. Impairment testing is performed at the reporting-unit level (which is the same level as the Company’s four major operating segments identified in Note 25 to the Consolidated Financial Statements). The first part of the test is a comparison, at the reporting unit level, of the fair value of each reporting unit to its carrying value, including goodwill. If the fair value is less than the

19




carrying value, then the second part of the test is needed to measure the amount of potential goodwill impairment. The implied fair value of the reporting unit goodwill is calculated and compared to the actual carrying value of goodwill recorded within the reporting unit. If the carrying value of reporting unit goodwill exceeds the implied fair value of that goodwill, then the Company would recognize an impairment loss for the amount of the difference, which would be recorded as a charge against net income.

The fair values of the reporting units are determined primarily using discounted cash flow models based on each reporting unit’s internal forecasts. In addition, analysis using market-based trading and transaction multiples, where available, is used to assess the reasonableness of the valuations derived from the discounted cash flow models.

Goodwill was not impaired as of December 31, 2005 or December 31, 2004, nor was any goodwill written off during the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003. For additional information regarding the carrying values of goodwill by operating segment, see Note 7 to the Consolidated Financial Statements – “Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets.”

Other Intangible assets

As part of a business combination accounted for under the purchase method, the Company must record all acquired assets and liabilities at fair value as of the acquisition date. Acquired assets include any identified intangible assets, such as purchased credit card relationships or core deposit intangibles. The fair value of those intangible assets usually is determined based on a discounted cash flow model that considers the expected net cash inflows resulting from those intangible relationships. If the intangible asset has a determinable finite life, the asset is amortized through earnings over its estimated life. Such amortization expense generally is recognized in the Consolidated Statements of Income under the noninterest expense caption, “Other Expense.”  For additional information regarding other intangible assets, see Note 7 to the Consolidated Financial Statements – “Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets.”

Derivatives and Hedging Activities

The Company enters into derivative contracts to manage the various risks associated with certain assets, liabilities, or probable forecasted transactions. When the Company enters into derivative contracts, the derivative instrument is designated as: (1) a hedge of the fair value of a recognized asset or liability or of an unrecognized firm commitment (a “fair value” hedge); (2) a hedge of the variability in expected future cash flows associated with an existing recognized asset or liability or a probable forecasted transaction (a “cash flow” hedge); or (3) held for other risk management purposes (“risk management derivatives”).

All derivatives, whether designated in hedging relationships or not, are recorded at fair value as either assets or liabilities on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition. Changes in fair value of derivatives that are not in hedge accounting relationships (as in (3) above) are recorded within the Consolidated Statements of Income in the period in which the change in value occurs. Changes in the fair value of derivatives that are designated as cash flow hedges (as in (2) above), to the extent such hedges are deemed highly effective, are recorded as a separate component of accumulated other comprehensive income and reclassified into earnings when the earnings effect of the hedged cash flows is recognized. Changes in the fair value of derivatives in qualifying fair value hedge accounting relationships (as in (1) above) are recorded each period in earnings along with the change in fair value of the hedged item.

The determination of whether a derivative qualifies for hedge accounting requires judgment about the application of Statement No. 133, as amended. Statement No. 133, as amended, requires contemporaneous documentation of the Company’s hedge relationships. Such documentation includes the nature of the risk being hedged, the identification of the asset or cash flow, or the group of assets or cash flows, that share the risk exposure that is designated as being hedged (i.e., the hedged item), the selection of the instrument that will be used to hedge the identified risk, and the method used to assess the effectiveness of the hedge

20




relationship. The effectiveness assessment requires calculations that utilize standard statistical methods of correlation that must support the determination that the hedging relationship is expected to be highly effective, during the period that the hedge is designated, in achieving offsetting changes in fair value or cash flows attributable to the hedged risk. If the Company’s documentation and assessment of effectiveness are not considered to be adequate to achieve hedge accounting treatment, the derivative is treated as a free-standing risk management instrument.

Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses and Contingent Credit Risk Liabilities

Allowance for loan and lease losses

The allowance for loan and lease losses represents management’s estimate of incurred credit losses inherent in the Company’s loan and lease portfolios as of the balance sheet date. The estimation of the allowance is based on a variety of factors, including past loan loss experience, the current credit profile of the Company’s borrowers, adverse situations that have occurred that may affect the borrowers’ ability to repay, the estimated value of underlying collateral, the interest rate climate as it affects adjustable-rate loans and general economic conditions. Determining the adequacy of the allowance is complex and requires judgment by management about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain. Subsequent evaluations of the loan portfolio, in light of the factors then prevailing may result in significant changes in the allowance for loan and lease losses in future periods.

The allowance for loan and lease losses is reported within the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition and the provision for loan and lease losses is reported within the Consolidated Statements of Income.

The estimates and judgments are described in further detail in the subsequent section of Management’s Discussion and Analysis – “Credit Risk Management” and in Note 1 to the Consolidated Financial Statements – “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies.”

Contingent Credit Risk Liabilities

In the ordinary course of business, the Company sells loans to third parties but retains credit risk exposure on those loans. When loans are sold with retained credit risk provisions attached to the sale, the Company commits to stand ready to perform, if the loan defaults, by making payments to remedy the default or repurchasing the loan. The Company also sells loans without retained credit risk that it may be required to repurchase for violation of a representation or warranty made in connection with the sale of the loan that has a material adverse effect on the value of the loan, or if the Company agreed to repurchase the loan in the event of a first payment or early payment default. When a loan sold to an investor without retained credit risk fails to perform according to its contractual terms, the investor will typically review the loan file to search for errors that may have been made in the process of originating the loan. If errors are discovered and it is determined that such errors constitute a violation of a representation or warranty made to the investor in connection with the loan’s sale, then the Company will be required to either repurchase the loan or indemnify the investor for losses sustained if the violation had a material adverse effect on the value of the loan.

In 2004 and 2005, the Company’s Long Beach Mortgage Company subsidiary engaged in whole loan sale transactions of originated subprime loans in which it agreed to repurchase from the investor each “early payment default” loan at a price equal to the loan’s face value plus the amount of any premium paid by the investor. An early payment default occurs when the borrower fails to make the first post-sale payment due on the loan by a contractually specified date. Usually when such an event occurs, the fair value of the loan at the time of its repurchase is lower than the face value. In the fourth quarter of 2005, the Company experienced increased incidents of repurchases of early payment default loans sold by Long Beach Mortgage Company and this trend is expected to continue in the first part of 2006.

21




Reserves are established for the Company’s exposure to these contingent credit risk liabilities in the aforementioned circumstances when it becomes probable that a loss has been incurred and the amount can be reasonably estimated. Throughout the life of these contingent credit risk liabilities, the Company may learn of additional information that can affect the assessment of loss probability or the estimation of the amounts involved. Changes in these assessments can lead to significant changes in the recorded reserves. Contingent credit risk liabilities are recorded within other liabilities on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition, and losses are recorded on the Consolidated Statements of Income under the noninterest income caption “Revenue from sales and servicing of home mortgage loans.”

Recently Issued Accounting Standards

In December 2004, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued a revised version of the original Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (“Statement”) No. 123, Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation . Statement No. 123R, Share-Based Payment , supersedes Accounting Principles Board (“APB”) Opinion No. 25, Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees . This Statement requires that the cost resulting from all share-based payment transactions be recognized in the financial statements. This Statement establishes fair value as the measurement objective in accounting for share-based payment arrangements and requires all entities to apply a fair value-based measurement method in accounting for share-based payment transactions with employees, except for equity instruments held by employee stock ownership plans. Effective January 1, 2003 and in accordance with the transitional guidance of Statement No. 148, Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation  – Transition and Disclosure , the Company elected to prospectively apply the fair value method of accounting for stock-based awards granted subsequent to December 31, 2002. The Company will prospectively apply Statement No. 123R to its financial statements as of January 1, 2006. However, as the Company has already adopted Statement No. 148 and substantially all stock-based awards granted prior to its adoption have fully vested as of December 31, 2005, Statement No. 123R will not have a significant effect on the Consolidated Statements of Income or the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition.

In March 2005, Securities and Exchange Commission (‘‘SEC’’) Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 107 (‘‘SAB 107’’) was issued, which expresses views of the staff regarding the interaction between Statement No. 123R, Share-Based Payment , and certain SEC rules and regulations and provides the staff’s views regarding the valuation of share-based payment arrangements for public companies. The Company will consider the guidance provided by SAB 107 as part of its adoption of Statement No. 123R.

In May 2005, the FASB issued Statement No. 154, Accounting Changes and Error Corrections  – a replacement of APB Opinion No. 20 and FASB Statement No. 3 . This Statement replaces APB Opinion No. 20, Accounting Changes, and Statement No. 3, Reporting Accounting Changes in Interim Financial Statements , and changes the requirements for the accounting and reporting of a change in accounting principle. This Statement requires changes in accounting principles to be retrospectively applied to the prior periods presented in the financial statements, unless it is impracticable to determine either the period-specific effects or the cumulative effect of the change. This Statement applies to all voluntary changes in accounting principles and also applies to changes required by an accounting pronouncement in the unusual instance that the pronouncement does not include specific transition provisions. This Statement also carries forward, without substantive change, the provisions for the correction of an error from APB Opinion No. 20. Statement No. 154 is effective for accounting changes and corrections of errors made after December 31, 2005. The Company does not expect the application of this Statement to have a significant effect on the Consolidated Statements of Income or the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition.

In February 2006, the FASB issued Statement No. 155, Accounting for Certain Hybrid Financial Instruments . This Statement amends Statements No. 133, Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities and No. 140 , Accounting for Transfers and Servicing of Financial Assets and Extinguishments of

22




Liabilities to simplify and make more consistent the accounting for certain financial instruments. This Statement permits fair value remeasurement for any hybrid financial instrument with an embedded derivative that otherwise would require bifurcation, provided that the whole instrument is accounted for on a fair value basis and establishes a requirement to evaluate interests in securitized financial assets to identify interests that are freestanding derivatives or that are hybrid financial instruments that contain an embedded derivative requiring bifurcation. This Statement also allows a qualifying special purpose entity to hold a derivative financial instrument that pertains to a beneficial interest. Statement No. 155 is effective for all of the Company’s financial instruments acquired or issued after December 31, 2006. Earlier adoption is permitted as of the beginning of an entity’s fiscal year, provided the entity has not yet issued financial statements, including financial statements for any interim period for that fiscal year. The Company is currently evaluating the impact this guidance will have on the Consolidated Statements of Income or the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition.

23




Five-Year Summary of Selected Financial Data

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

2002

 

2001

 

 

 

(in millions, except per share amounts)

 

Income Statement Data (for the year ended)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net interest income

 

$   7,886

 

$   7,116

 

$   7,629

 

$   8,129

 

$   6,492

 

Provision for loan and lease losses

 

316

 

209

 

42

 

404

 

426

 

Noninterest income

 

5,738

 

4,612

 

5,850

 

4,469

 

3,176

 

Noninterest expense

 

7,870

 

7,535

 

7,408

 

6,188

 

4,416

 

Net income

 

3,432

 

2,878

 

3,880

 

3,861

 

3,104

 

Basic earnings per common share (1) :

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations

 

3.84

 

2.88

 

4.20

 

4.01

 

3.57

 

Income from discontinued operations, net  

 

 

0.46

 

0.09

 

0.08

 

0.07

 

Net income

 

3.84

 

3.34

 

4.29

 

4.09

 

3.64

 

Diluted earnings per common share (1) :

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations

 

3.73

 

2.81

 

4.12

 

3.94

 

3.51

 

Income from discontinued operations, net  

 

 

0.45

 

0.09

 

0.08

 

0.07

 

Net income

 

3.73

 

3.26

 

4.21

 

4.02

 

3.58

 

Dividends declared per common share (1)

 

1.90

 

1.74

 

1.40

 

1.06

 

0.90

 

Balance Sheet Data (at year end)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Securities

 

$ 24,659

 

$ 19,219

 

$ 36,707

 

$ 43,905

 

$ 58,233

 

Loans held for sale

 

33,582

 

42,743

 

20,837

 

39,623

 

27,574

 

Loans held in portfolio

 

229,632

 

207,071

 

175,150

 

143,028

 

126,396

 

Mortgage servicing rights

 

8,041

 

5,906

 

6,354

 

5,341

 

6,241

 

Goodwill

 

8,298

 

6,196

 

6,196

 

6,213

 

2,116

 

Assets

 

343,839

 

307,918

 

275,178

 

268,225

 

242,468

 

Deposits

 

193,167

 

173,658

 

153,181

 

155,516

 

106,946

 

Securities sold under agreements to repurchase

 

15,532

 

15,944

 

28,333

 

16,717

 

39,447

 

Advances from Federal Home Loan
Banks

 

68,771

 

70,074

 

48,330

 

51,265

 

61,072

 

Other borrowings

 

23,777

 

18,498

 

15,483

 

14,712

 

9,925

 

Stockholders’ equity

 

27,616

 

21,226

 

19,742

 

20,061

 

14,025

 

Supplemental Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loan volume:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adjustable rate

 

$ 95,114

 

$ 103,305

 

$ 99,899

 

$ 84,627

 

$ 37,224

 

Fixed rate

 

78,118

 

77,723

 

263,604

 

180,745

 

108,105

 

Specialty mortgage finance (2)

 

34,490

 

31,334

 

20,678

 

14,077

 

10,333

 

Total home loan volume

 

207,722

 

212,362

 

384,181

 

279,449

 

155,662

 

Total loan volume

 

261,157

 

266,733

 

432,245

 

309,419

 

172,951

 


(1)                  Restated for all stock splits.

(2)                  Represents purchased subprime loan portfolios and mortgages originated by Long Beach Mortgage Company.

24




Ratios and Other Supplemental Data

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

 

 

(dollars in millions, except per share amounts)

 

Profitability

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return on average assets (1)

 

1.05

%

1.01

%

1.37

%

Return on average common equity (1)

 

14.63

 

14.02

 

18.85

 

Net interest margin

 

2.67

 

2.82

 

3.11

 

Efficiency ratio (2)(3)

 

57.76

 

64.25

 

54.96

 

Asset Quality

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nonaccrual loans (4)(5)

 

$   1,686

 

$   1,534

 

$   1,626

 

Foreclosed assets (4)

 

276

 

261

 

311

 

Total nonperforming assets (4)(5)

 

1,962

 

1,795

 

1,937

 

Nonperforming assets/total assets (4)(5)

 

0.57

%

0.58

%

0.70

%

Restructured loans (4)

 

$         22

 

$         34

 

$      111

 

Total nonperforming assets and restructured loans (4)(5)

 

1,984

 

1,829

 

2,048

 

Allowance for loan and lease losses (4)

 

1,695

 

1,301

 

1,250

 

Allowance as a percentage of total loans held in portfolio (4)

 

0.74

%

0.63

%

0.71

%

Net charge-offs

 

$      244

 

$      135

 

$      309

 

Capital Adequacy (4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity/total assets

 

8.03

%

6.89

%

7.17

%

Tangible equity (6) /total tangible assets (6)

 

5.72

 

5.05

 

5.26

 

Estimated total risk-based capital/risk-weighted assets (7)

 

10.90

 

11.34

 

10.94

 

Per Common Share Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of common shares outstanding at end of period (in thousands)

 

993,914

 

874,262

 

880,986

 

Common stock dividend payout ratio

 

49.48

%

52.10

%

32.63

%

Book value per common share (4)(8)

 

$   27.95

 

$   24.45

 

$   22.56

 

Market prices:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

High

 

44.54

 

45.28

 

46.55

 

Low

 

36.92

 

37.63

 

32.98

 

Year end

 

43.50

 

42.28

 

40.12

 


(1)                  Includes income from continuing and discontinued operations.

(2)                  Based on continuing operations.

(3)                  The efficiency ratio is defined as noninterest expense divided by total revenue (net interest income and noninterest income).

(4)                  As of year end.

(5)                  Excludes nonaccrual loans held for sale.

(6)                  Excludes unrealized net gain/loss on available-for-sale securities and derivatives, goodwill and intangible assets, but includes MSR. These adjustments are applied to both the numerator and the denominator.

(7)                  Estimate of what the total risk-based capital ratio would be if Washington Mutual, Inc. were a bank holding company that is subject to Federal Reserve Board capital requirements.

(8)                  Excludes 6 million shares held in escrow at December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003.

25




Earnings Performance from Continuing Operations

Net Interest Income

For 2005, net interest income increased $770 million, or 11%, compared with 2004. The increase was largely due to growth in average interest-earning assets, which collectively increased 17% during 2005. Partially offsetting the growth in interest-earning assets was further contraction in the net interest margin, which declined 15 basis points from 2004. The decrease in the net interest margin was due to an increase in the cost of the Company’s interest-bearing liabilities, which was driven by continual increases in short-term interest rates since June of 2004. This causes compression in the margin as the Company’s interest-bearing liabilities reprice at a faster pace than the Company’s interest-earning assets. Partially mitigating the disparity in repricing speeds during 2005 was growth in home equity lines of credit balances, which have repricing frequencies that are more closely aligned with the faster repricing behavior of the Company’s wholesale borrowings.

Interest rate contracts, including embedded derivatives, held for asset/liability risk management purposes increased net interest income by $52 million in 2005. Such interest rate contracts, including embedded derivatives, decreased net interest income by $222 million in 2004.

26




Certain average balances, together with the total dollar amounts of interest income and expense related to such balances and the weighted average interest rates, were as follows:

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

 

 

Average
Balance

 

Rate

 

Interest
Income

 

Average
Balance

 

Rate

 

Interest
Income

 

Average
Balance

 

Rate

 

Interest
Income

 

 

 

(dollars in millions)

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest-earning assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Federal funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell

 

$ 2,154

 

3.42

%

 

$     74

 

 

$    884

 

1.42

%

 

$     13

 

 

$ 2,570

 

 

1.45

%

 

 

$     37

 

 

Trading assets

 

7,217

 

6.50

 

 

469

 

 

2,368

 

6.39

 

 

151

 

 

1,235

 

 

6.78

 

 

 

84

 

 

Available-for-sale securities (1) :

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mortgage-backed securities

 

16,347

 

4.80

 

 

784

 

 

10,255

 

3.99

 

 

409

 

 

20,977

 

 

4.91

 

 

 

1,030

 

 

Investment securities

 

4,506

 

4.74

 

 

214

 

 

10,732

 

3.30

 

 

355

 

 

18,742

 

 

3.77

 

 

 

708

 

 

Loans held for sale (2)

 

44,847

 

5.31

 

 

2,382

 

 

29,721

 

4.95

 

 

1,472

 

 

45,438

 

 

5.51

 

 

 

2,501

 

 

Loans held in portfolio (2)(3) :

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loans secured by real estate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home (4)

 

110,326

 

4.90

 

 

5,403

 

 

107,518

 

4.21

 

 

4,529

 

 

86,443

 

 

4.77

 

 

 

4,124

 

 

Specialty mortgage finance (5)

 

20,555

 

5.19

 

 

1,066

 

 

15,767

 

4.84

 

 

763

 

 

10,794

 

 

5.43

 

 

 

586

 

 

Total home loans

 

130,881

 

4.94

 

 

6,469

 

 

123,285

 

4.29

 

 

5,292

 

 

97,237

 

 

4.84

 

 

 

4,710

 

 

Home equity loans and lines of credit

 

47,915

 

5.93

 

 

2,841

 

 

35,859

 

4.69

 

 

1,683

 

 

21,163

 

 

4.98

 

 

 

1,053

 

 

Home construction (6)

 

2,074

 

6.22

 

 

129

 

 

2,489

 

5.50

 

 

137

 

 

2,062

 

 

5.90

 

 

 

122

 

 

Multi-family

 

24,070

 

5.31

 

 

1,279

 

 

21,090

 

4.96

 

 

1,046

 

 

19,409

 

 

5.30

 

 

 

1,029

 

 

Other real estate

 

5,091

 

6.56

 

 

334

 

 

6,396

 

5.94

 

 

380

 

 

7,243

 

 

6.35

 

 

 

460

 

 

Total loans secured by real estate

 

210,031

 

5.26

 

 

11,052

 

 

189,119

 

4.51

 

 

8,538

 

 

147,114

 

 

5.01

 

 

 

7,374

 

 

Consumer:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Credit card

 

2,082

 

11.96

 

 

249

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other

 

707

 

10.66

 

 

75

 

 

899

 

10.11

 

 

91

 

 

1,208

 

 

8.87

 

 

 

107

 

 

Commercial business

 

2,614

 

5.00

 

 

131

 

 

4,415

 

4.43

 

 

196

 

 

4,165

 

 

4.49

 

 

 

187

 

 

Total loans held in portfolio

 

215,434

 

5.34

 

 

11,507

 

 

194,433

 

4.54

 

 

8,825

 

 

152,487

 

 

5.03

 

 

 

7,668

 

 

Other (7)

 

4,367

 

3.63

 

 

158

 

 

4,108

 

3.05

 

 

125

 

 

3,874

 

 

3.47

 

 

 

135

 

 

Total interest-earning assets

 

294,872

 

5.29

 

 

15,588

 

 

252,501

 

4.50

 

 

11,350

 

 

245,323

 

 

4.96

 

 

 

12,163

 

 

Noninterest-earning assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mortgage servicing rights

 

6,597

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6,406

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5,721

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goodwill

 

6,712

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6,196

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6,198

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other assets (8)

 

18,496

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18,975

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25,877

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$ 326,677

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$ 284,078

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$ 283,119

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


(1)                  The average balance and yield are based on average amortized cost balances.

(2)                  Nonaccrual loans and related income, if any, are included in their respective loan categories.

(3)                  Interest income for loans held in portfolio includes amortization of net deferred loan origination costs of $401 million, $351 million, and $314 million for the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003.

(4)                  Deferred interest recognized in earnings that resulted from negative amortization within the Option ARM portfolio totaled $316 million, $19 million and $7 million for the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003.

(5)                  Represents purchased subprime home loan portfolios and subprime home loans originated by Long Beach Mortgage Company and held in its investment portfolio.

(6)                  Represents loans to builders for the purpose of financing the acquisition, development and construction of single-family residences for sale and construction loans made directly to the intended occupant of a single-family residence.

(7)                  Interest-earning assets in nonaccrual status (other than loans) and related income, if any, are included within this category.

(8)                  Includes assets of continuing and discontinued operations.

(This table is continued on next page.)

27




 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

 

 

Average
 Balance

 

Rate

 

Interest
Expense

 

Average
Balance

 

Rate

 

Interest
Expense

 

Average
Balance

 

Rate

 

Interest
Expense

 

 

 

(dollars in millions)

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest-bearing liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deposits:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest-bearing checking deposits

 

$ 46,524

 

 

1.95

%

 

 

$ 906

 

 

$ 59,826

 

 

1.28

%

 

 

$ 766

 

 

$ 62,723

 

 

1.69

%

 

 

$ 1,057

 

 

Savings and money market deposits

 

42,555

 

 

1.76

 

 

 

750

 

 

35,927

 

 

1.11

 

 

 

399

 

 

28,085

 

 

0.94

 

 

 

263

 

 

Time deposits

 

62,175

 

 

3.33

 

 

 

2,072

 

 

35,917

 

 

2.44

 

 

 

878

 

 

31,416

 

 

2.69

 

 

 

845

 

 

Total interest-bearing deposits

 

151,254

 

 

2.46

 

 

 

3,728

 

 

131,670

 

 

1.55

 

 

 

2,043

 

 

122,224

 

 

1.77

 

 

 

2,165

 

 

Federal funds purchased and commercial paper

 

5,314

 

 

3.56

 

 

 

190

 

 

3,522

 

 

1.50

 

 

 

53

 

 

3,158

 

 

1.18

 

 

 

37

 

 

Securities sold under agreements to repurchase

 

15,365

 

 

3.40

 

 

 

523

 

 

16,660

 

 

2.26

 

 

 

377

 

 

22,318

 

 

2.44

 

 

 

545

 

 

Advances from Federal Home Loan
Banks

 

68,713

 

 

3.46

 

 

 

2,377

 

 

58,622

 

 

2.16

 

 

 

1,268

 

 

49,441

 

 

2.62

 

 

 

1,296

 

 

Other

 

21,603

 

 

4.09

 

 

 

884

 

 

13,724

 

 

3.59

 

 

 

493

 

 

13,315

 

 

3.68

 

 

 

491

 

 

Total interest-bearing liabilities

 

262,249

 

 

2.94

 

 

 

7,702

 

 

224,198

 

 

1.89

 

 

 

4,234

 

 

210,456

 

 

2.15

 

 

 

4,534

 

 

Noninterest-bearing sources:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Noninterest-bearing deposits

 

34,769

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33,738

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

41,361

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other liabilities (9)

 

6,192

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5,614

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10,724

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity

 

23,467

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20,528

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20,578

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

 

$ 326,677

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$ 284,078

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$ 283,119

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net interest spread and net interest income

 

 

 

 

2.35

 

 

 

$ 7,886

 

 

 

 

 

2.61

 

 

 

$ 7,116

 

 

 

 

 

2.81

 

 

 

$ 7,629

 

 

Impact of noninterest-bearing sources

 

 

 

 

0.32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.21

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.30

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net interest margin

 

 

 

 

2.67

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.82

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.11

 

 

 

 

 

 


(9)                  Includes liabilities of continuing and discontinued operations.

28




The dollar amounts of interest income and interest expense fluctuate depending upon changes in interest rates and upon changes in the volume of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities. Changes attributable to (i) changes in volume (changes in average outstanding balances multiplied by the prior period’s rate), (ii) changes in rate (changes in average interest rate multiplied by the prior period’s volume), and (iii) changes in rate/volume (changes in rate times the change in volume) which were allocated proportionately to the changes in volume and the changes in rate and included in the relevant column below were as follows:

 

 

2005 vs. 2004

 

2004 vs. 2003

 

 

 

Increase/(Decrease)
Due to

 

Total

 

Increase/(Decrease)
Due to

 

Total

 

 

 

Volume

 

Rate

 

Change

 

Volume

 

Rate

 

Change

 

 

 

(in millions)

 

Interest Income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Federal funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell

 

 

$    31

 

 

$    30

 

 

$    61

 

 

 

$  (24

)

 

$        –

 

$    (24

)

Trading assets

 

 

315

 

 

3

 

 

318

 

 

 

73

 

 

(6

)

67

 

Available-for-sale securities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mortgage-backed securities

 

 

280

 

 

95

 

 

375

 

 

 

(454

)

 

(167

)

(621

)

Investment securities

 

 

(257

)

 

116

 

 

(141

)

 

 

(273

)

 

(80

)

(353

)

Loans held for sale

 

 

797

 

 

113

 

 

910

 

 

 

(798

)

 

(231

)

(1,029

)

Loans held in portfolio:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loans secured by real estate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home

 

 

121

 

 

754

 

 

875

 

 

 

926

 

 

(521

)

405

 

Specialty mortgage finance (1)

 

 

245

 

 

57

 

 

302

 

 

 

246

 

 

(69

)

177

 

Total home loans

 

 

366

 

 

811

 

 

1,177

 

 

 

1,172

 

 

(590

)

582

 

Home equity loans and lines of credit

 

 

649

 

 

509

 

 

1,158

 

 

 

693

 

 

(63

)

630

 

Home construction (2)

 

 

(24

)

 

16

 

 

(8

)

 

 

24

 

 

(9

)

15

 

Multi-family

 

 

155

 

 

78

 

 

233

 

 

 

86

 

 

(69

)

17

 

Other real estate

 

 

(83

)

 

37

 

 

(46

)

 

 

(52

)

 

(28

)

(80

)

Total loans secured by real estate

 

 

1,063

 

 

1,451

 

 

2,514

 

 

 

1,923

 

 

(759

)

1,164

 

Consumer:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Credit card

 

 

249

 

 

 

 

249

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other

 

 

(20

)

 

4

 

 

(16

)

 

 

(30

)

 

14

 

(16

)

Commercial business

 

 

(88

)

 

23

 

 

(65

)

 

 

11

 

 

(2

)

9

 

Total loans held in portfolio

 

 

1,204

 

 

1,478

 

 

2,682

 

 

 

1,904

 

 

(747

)

1,157

 

Other

 

 

8

 

 

25

 

 

33

 

 

 

7

 

 

(17

)

(10

)

Total interest income

 

 

2,378

 

 

1,860

 

 

4,238

 

 

 

435

 

 

(1,248

)

(813

)

Interest Expense

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deposits:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest-bearing checking deposits

 

 

(197

)

 

336

 

 

139

 

 

 

(47

)

 

(244

)

(291

)

Savings and money market deposits

 

 

84

 

 

268

 

 

352

 

 

 

82

 

 

54

 

136

 

Time deposits

 

 

797

 

 

397

 

 

1,194

 

 

 

114

 

 

(81

)

33

 

Total deposits

 

 

684

 

 

1,001

 

 

1,685

 

 

 

149

 

 

(271

)

(122

)

Federal funds purchased and commercial paper

 

 

37

 

 

100

 

 

137

 

 

 

5

 

 

11

 

16

 

Securities sold under agreements to repurchase

 

 

(31

)

 

177

 

 

146

 

 

 

(130

)

 

(38