UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

[X] ANNUAL REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF

THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended: December 31, 2020

 

Commission file number 000-50099

 

GRAPEFRUIT USA, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

California   95-4451059

(State of

Incorporation)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

1000 Northwest Street, Mid-Town Brandy Wine, Suite 1200-3094, Wilmington, DE 19801

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

 

310-575-1175

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class   Trading symbol(s)   Name of exchange on which registered
No par value common stock   GPFT   OTCQB

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

 

Common Stock, $0.0001 par value

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer [  ] Accelerated filer [  ]
Non-accelerated filer [X] Smaller reporting company [X]
Emerging growth company [  ]    

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes [  ] No [X]

 

The aggregate market value of the shares of common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of March 24, 2021 was $32,711,852 based on the closing price of $0.15 per share of common stock of Grapefruit USA, Inc. as quoted on the OTC Pink Marketplace on that date.

 

There were 510,767,041 shares outstanding of the registrant’s Common Stock as of April 15, 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I  
ITEM 1 Business 3
ITEM 1A Risk Factors 11
ITEM 2 Properties 12
ITEM 3 Legal Proceedings 12
ITEM 4 Mine Safety Disclosures 12
PART II  
ITEM 5 Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters, and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 12
ITEM 6 Selected Financial Data 13
ITEM 7 Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 14
ITEM 8 Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 22
ITEM 9 Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 40
ITEM 9A Controls and Procedures 40
ITEM 9B Other Information 41
PART III  
ITEM 10 Directors, Executive Officers, and Corporate Governance 41
ITEM 11 Executive Compensation 44
ITEM 12 Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters 46
ITEM 13 Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence 47
ITEM 14 Principal Accounting Fees and Services 47
PART IV  
ITEM 15 Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules 48
SIGNATURES 50

 

2
 

 

PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

BUSINESS

 

Overview

 

Grapefruit USA, Inc (“we”, “our”, “us”, “GBI”, “Grapefruit”, or “the Company”) was formed as a California corporation on August 28, 2017 and began operating in September 2017.

 

On July 10, 2019, Grapefruit closed the Share Exchange after the completion of all conditions subsequent contemplated by the Share Exchange Agreement among the parties thereto ( “SEA”), by which Imaging3, Inc. (“IGNG”) was acquired in a reverse acquisition (the “Acquisition”) by the former shareholders of Grapefruit, the accounting acquirer. Under the terms of the SEA executed on May 31, 2019, IGNG became obligated to issue to Grapefruit’s existing shareholders that number of newly issued restricted IGNG common shares such that the former Grapefruit shareholders (now new IGNG shareholders) will own approximately 81% of the post-Acquisition IGNG common shares and the current IGNG shareholders will retain 19% of the post-Acquisition IGNG common shares. At the time of the execution of the SEA, IGNG had approximately 85,218,249 outstanding shares of common stock. Therefore, IGNG issued to Grapefruit’s shareholders 362,979,114 IGNG common shares to Grapefruit’s current shareholder on a pro rata basis with their then-current ownership of Grapefruit of which Bradley Yourist and Daniel J. Yourist own a combined 72.26%, or approximately 259,967,136 shares. Accordingly, the financial statements are prepared using the acquisition method of accounting with GBI as the accounting acquirer and IGNG treated as the legal acquirer and accounting acquiree. Because Imaging3, Inc. did not meet the accounting definition of an operating business, having only nominal assets, the reverse merger transaction was treated as a recapitalization and no goodwill was recognized.

 

The Company has applied for and received our provisional distribution renewal licensure which allows us to operate through May 13, 2021. Our annual manufacturing license has been renewed by the California Department of Health. Grapefruit has not yet applied for a license to cultivate and will not until construction has begun on our cultivation facility. We own two acres of fully entitled cannabis real property located in the Coachillin’ Industrial Cultivation and Ancillary Canna-Business Park. The location within Coachillin’ allows the Company to apply for and hold every cannabis license available under the California Cannabis laws.

 

We intend on building out the real property into a distribution, manufacturing and high-tech cultivation facility to further its goal to become a seed to sale, fully vertically integrated Cannabis and CBD product Company. Grapefruit’s plans include an indoor 22,000 square foot multi-tiered canopy and adjoining tissue culture rooms.

 

We became members of the Indian Canyon and 18th Property Association on September 19, 2017 and have an ownership interest of 1.46% based upon the 77,156 gross parcel square foot of our property located in an approximately 5.3 million square foot facility. As of December 31, 2020, the common areas continue to be built throughout the entire canna-business park and are not complete.

 

Share Exchange

 

IGNG began discussions with Grapefruit Boulevard Investments, Inc., a California corporation, on March 1, 2019, regarding the possible reverse acquisition of IGNG by Grapefruit.

 

On March 11, 2019, IGNG signed a non-binding letter of intent (“LOI”) to be acquired in a reverse acquisition via a share exchange agreement to be completed at some later date (the “Acquisition”) by Grapefruit. Grapefruit holds licenses issued by the State of California to manufacture and distribute cannabis products in California. Grapefruit commenced operations in mid-2018 and has received more than $450,000 in revenue from operations since Grapefruit own and operate a manufacturing plant and distribution center within the Coachillin’ Industrial Cultivation and Ancillary Canna Business Park in Desert Hot Springs near Palm Springs in Riverside County, California (the “Coachillin Site”). On Thursday, March 7, 2019 Grapefruit obtained its final permit and clearance from local authorities to commence operation of an ethanol extraction laboratory (the “Extraction Lab”) at the Coachillin site and commenced extraction and post-production processing operations. The Extraction Lab is expected to be able to produce both THC and CBD oils from either Biomass or unrefined biomass or crude oil.

 

3
 

 

Pursuant to the terms of the LOI, IGNG and Grapefruit initiated negotiations intended to result in completion of a definitive Share Exchange Agreement (the “Exchange Agreement”) encompassing all of the material terms of the Exchange Agreement during the second quarter of 2019. Pursuant to the terms of the LOI, the Exchange Agreement provided, among other things, that upon conclusion of the Acquisition, Grapefruit’s designees would own 81% of the then outstanding common shares of the Company and the Company’s current shareholders would own 19% of such outstanding common shares. In addition, IGNG was required to settle certain outstanding creditor obligations on terms acceptable to both Grapefruit and IGNG.

 

On July 10, 2019, IGNG effectuated a Share Exchange pursuant to that certain Exchange Agreement. On the Closing Date, IGNG issued to the Stakeholders an aggregate of three hundred sixty-two million, two hundred, twenty-nine thousand, one hundred and one (362,979,114) newly issued shares of Common Stock of the Company, $0.0001 par value, in exchange for 100% of the shares of Grapefruit’s common stock. As a result, thereof, Grapefruit became a wholly owned subsidiary of IGNG.

 

By early June 2019, the Company had shifted its focus to manufacturing cannabis distillates and edibles and distribution of such cannabis products.

 

The Company is now focused on becoming a premier manufacturer and distributor of legal cannabis products in California. We will distribute our own branded product lines as well as product produced by other manufacturers. We will continue to service the wholesale cannabis marketplace by selling bulk Honey THC Oil, Flower and Trim to manufactures and other distributors throughout California. We will also offer our expert cannabis advice to others in connection with their branding, compliance, packaging, extraction, edible manufacturing and distribution logistics efforts.

 

Auctus Financing

 

On May 31, 2019, the Company executed the SPA with Auctus pursuant to the terms of which the Company agreed to sell $4,000,000 of the Notes and issue $6,200,000 of callable warrants (the “Warrants” and, together with the Notes, the “Securities”) to Auctus. Auctus is the Selling Security Holder. In addition, on May 31, 2019, we also entered into a registration rights agreement with Auctus (the “Registration Rights Agreement”) whereby we are obligated to file a registration statement to register the resale of the shares underlying the Securities. On July 25, 2019 (as amended on January 17, 2020), a registration statement was filed to comply with the Registration Rights Agreement . Pursuant to the SPA, Auctus became obligated to purchase the $4,000,000 of Notes from Grapefruit in four tranches as follows: $600,000 at the SPA closing, which was funded on June 6, 2019; the second tranche of $1,422,750 on the day IGNG filed the registration statement, which was funded on August 16, 2019; the third tranche of $1,030,000 was funded the day the SEC declares the registration statement effective and the fourth tranche of $1 million was funded 90 days after effectiveness. As of December 31, 2020, all tranches of this financing were completed. The Company has received gross proceeds of $4,052,750.

 

Industry Overview

 

Global consumer spending on legal cannabis in 2018 showed a growth rate of 20 percent in sales of cannabis in regulated markets. Cannabis sales are on track to increase 36 percent to $14.9 billion in 2019 and reach $40 billion by 2024 according to the “State of Legal Cannabis Markets” Report released by Arcview Market Research and BDS Analytics. This report points to growth in the cannabis markets while underlining the challenges that face the sector. The “Total Cannabinoid Market” (“TCM”) in the United States, which includes medical and recreational cannabis sales in regulated dispensaries, plus sales of FDA-approved pharmaceuticals and hemp-based CBD products.

 

Most notably, in 2018 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved GW Pharmaceutical’s Epidiolex and passed the 2018 Farm Bill legalizing hemp and cannabidiol oil derived from hemp as long as it contained less than 0.3% THC. According to State of Legal Cannabis Markets, 7th Edition, by Arcview Market Research and BDS Analytics, the 2018 Farm Bill allows pharmacies, extraction labs, and general retailers to sell CBD-based products in all 50 states, which is expected to enhance the TCM. In the U.S. alone, sales of CBD products in all channels are expected to reach $20 billion by 2024.

 

4
 

 

In 2018 the legal cannabis industry experienced one of its slowest annual expansion rates since Colorado launched the adult-use era in 2014.

 

In California, its legal spending on cannabis fell, from $3 billion in 2017 to $2.5 billion, in the year in which it implemented an adult-use regulatory regime. A key takeaway from the California market is that highly restrictive regulations and high tax rates are hurting the legal market’s ability to compete with the illicit market. The barriers to enter into the legal cannabis market are also increasing in California because its temporary cannabis licensing scheme has ended. Currently any license applicant must now wait a protracted amount of time before the applicant receives its license and must wait a year in some cases for the application to make its way through the local and state licensing authorities.

 

According to the “State of Legal Cannabis Markets” Report, other key trends in the United States Legal Cannabis Markets include:

 

  Total legal cannabis spending in regulated dispensaries in the U.S. topped $9.8 billion in 2018, and is forecast to grow to $30 billion in 2024, a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 20 percent.
     
  Investment capital raised by cannabis companies more than quadrupled to $14 billion in 2018, according to Viridian Capital Advisors.
     
  Despite a 55 percent decline in 2018 in New Cannabis Ventures’ Global Cannabis Stock Index, the five largest Canadian licensed producers closed the first quarter of 2019 at a combined market capitalization of $48 billion.
     
  A total of 13 state markets will have passed the $1 billion mark in total annual legal cannabis spending by the end of 2024—by the end of 2018, only three had done so (California, Colorado and Washington).

 

Grapefruit’s Competitive Advantage in the Industry

 

Grapefruit holds its State of California provisional licensing from the Bureau of Cannabis Control and the California Department of Public Health. The Company has its permanent annually renewable provisional license as opposed to a temporary license. The Company expects the annual renewal to be a non-intrusive and scaled down as opposed to what the renewal process was previously. The Company is one of the earliest registered distribution companies with the State of California to have an annually renewable license as opposed to the temporary licenses previously granted. In January 2019, the State of California revised its cannabis regulations to restrict the ability of companies to become licensed businesses.

 

California has three distinct regulatory agencies that govern the issuance of cultivation licenses, manufacturing licenses and distribution licenses. In order to foster the then-nascent commercial cannabis industry, the State of California initially allowed each regulatory agency to grant temporary licensing to companies with very minimal regulatory requirements and oversight. In fact, a new or then-existing cannabis company only had to show State Regulators that their local city was allowing their commercial cannabis business to operate which was an uncomplicated task. A temporary license was a conditional license that allowed a cannabis business to engage in commercial cannabis activity for a period of 120 days. The State granted operators 90-day extensions of their temporary license while final cannabis regulations were being developed and officially implemented by the State.

 

On January 1, 2019, the State of California eliminated the temporary cannabis licensing scheme. The impact of this regulatory restriction prevents all new cannabis companies from starting their operations without first applying for, and obtaining, a provisional license from the appropriate regulatory agency. The same regulatory restriction prevents existing, but unregulated, cannabis companies from continuing to engage in commercial cannabis operations without shutting down while applying for, and obtaining, an annual license from the appropriate regulatory agency. The elimination of the temporary license scheme significantly thinned out the number of commercial cannabis businesses operating in the State. This was due to the regulatory requirements required to apply for an annual license which include compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act, provision of a Hazardous Waste Disposal Plan and the multitude of other regulatory requirements to operate a compliant cannabis business.

 

5
 

 

The regulatory changes have impacted the ability of new businesses to enter the marketplace and compete with Grapefruit. However, none of Grapefruit’s commercial cannabis businesses have been impacted by the regulatory changes to the marketplace.

 

Grapefruit owns two acres of fully entitled cannabis real property located in the Coachillin’ Industrial Cultivation and Ancillary Canna-Business Park. Grapefruit understood the State’s regulatory burdens and expense for commercial cannabis businesses to successfully operate. For example, the State requires cannabis business to provide 24 hour-per-day on-site armed security for their facility. This is a shared expense of the property Coachillin property owners. In addition, Coachillin property owners pay agricultural power rates of nine (9) cents per kilowatt hour which is significantly less than what others pay for power. The location within Coachillin allows the Company to apply for and hold every cannabis license available under the California Cannabis laws.

 

Grapefruit intends on building out the real property into a distribution, manufacturing and high-tech cultivation facility to further its goal to become a seed to sale, fully vertically integrated Cannabis and CBD product Company. Grapefruit’s plans include an indoor 22,000 square foot multi-tiered canopy and adjoining tissue culture rooms. The canopy is estimated to produce thousands of pounds of the highest quality indoor cultivars of cannabis annually.

 

The Coachillin’ property owners’ association, which Grapefruit is a part of, will feature a unique drive through retail cannabis dispensary right off highway 10 on the way to Coachella and Palm Springs. Grapefruit will have the right to sell its cannabis products directly to the public through the drive through dispensary. Coachillin’ will also feature a cannabis hotel and music stadium and other visitor areas. By Grapefruit locating in Coachillin, the company gains instant exposure to thousands of hotel guests and other cannabis visitors that will visit the Coachillin’ cannabis friendly resort over time. Grapefruit believes that the canna-tourism industry will mature to be similar to the wine industry and can capitalize on this industry by virtue of its location within the Canna-business park.

 

Distribution

 

Grapefruit initially obtained its California wholesale recreational and medicinal cannabis distribution license on January 4, 2018. Thereafter, Grapefruit met all of its ongoing regulatory requirements and filed its application for an annual distribution license. In May 2019, Grapefruit was granted its provisional distribution license, thereby acquiring the regulatory foundation necessary to expand its distribution business. From July 2018 through 2020, Grapefruit used its distribution license to sell bulk cannabis flowers and trim to other distributors and to manufacturers to satisfy their own raw materials requirements. In addition, Grapefruit sold flowers, vape cartridges and concentrates to licensed retailers throughout California.

 

In California, cannabis cultivators and manufactures are prohibited from selling their products – e.g., flowers or edibles - directly into the marketplace. These companies are required to use a licensed distributor, such as Grapefruit. Grapefruit’s distribution license affords it a twofold strategic advantage: first, to market and sell its own cannabis product lines to retailers throughout California; and second to buy and resell bulk cannabis oil, flower and trim as an unfettered middleman to any properly licensed customer anywhere in California that it identifies a profit opportunity.

 

Additionally, after marijuana plants are mature, they’re harvested within a certain time frame to keep the product fresh. Throughout the growth cycle and during this specific time period after the plant has been harvested, a grower will trim the plant of its leaves, focusing mostly on the remaining buds. Specifically speaking, trim is defined as the excess snipping of leaves from buds of marijuana plants. Note that leftover product can still be used to make extractions, tinctures, hash and edibles, so growers and trimmers alike can always increase sales with a larger product offering.

 

6
 

 

Manufacturing

 

The Company owns a fully licensed ethanol extraction facility in the City of Desert Hot Springs, CA. The Company owns and operates a Type 6 Ethanol Extraction Plant which removes the essential cannabis compounds, such as THC Distillate, that we, and others use, to produce cannabis products.

 

Grapefruit’s extraction lab produces high quality distillate or “Honey Oil” from trim that Grapefruit sources utilizing its distribution license as set forth above. THC Honey Oil is a fundamental cannabis commodity which serves as the active ingredient in products from infused edibles to tinctures/creams to the cartridges used in vapes or e-cigarettes. Honey Oil sells in the wholesale marketplace at approximately $6,250 to $8,800 per liter. Pricing is dependent on quantity purchased as well as other market factors such as the availability and cost of the underlying trim – the raw cannabis material from which Grapefruit produces oil. Grapefruit began extraction operations in May 2019. Plans to expand the lab’s production capacity were altered based on the demands of the marketplace. Additionally, the installation of lab equipment would have interfered with the production capacities of the lab. The Company decided to manufacture its own RSO (“Rick Simpson Oil”) infused product line as well as prepare the lab for the production run of its patchless patch topical cream. Grapefruit chose to set up its extraction laboratory in the City of Desert Hot Springs because the City does not tax the manufacture of oil by Grapefruit at its Desert Hot Springs extraction facility, thereby providing Grapefruit with an additional competitive advantage.

 

THC Distillate is an all-purpose product that is used in the manufacture of everything from cannabis edibles to “e-cigarette” vape carts to tinctures, to creams and pre-rolled cannabis “joints”. We sell our distillate in California to companies that manufacturer their own product lines of edibles and/or vape cards. We also intend to use our own Distillate to produce our branded line of edibles and vape carts to allow us to control the quality of our product lines. We also manufacture marijuana cigarettes (which we market as pre-rolls) for sale into the retail marketplace. This manufacturing process is streamlined through the use of machinery and our employees who inspect each marijuana cigarette to ensure quality control. We have partnered with different manufactures in California to manufacture our line of branded products we intend to distribute and/or sell into the marketplace. We do not restrict our needs to a single manufacturer or distribution company as we maintain ongoing relationships with Tier 1 vendors across the cannabis eco-system.

 

Branding

 

We package and brand cannabis products. One of the key elements to our branding strategy is performing an analysis on a product’s competitor(s) currently in the retail space and working to make our product stand out. We work on pricing strategies, boutique branding elements and other ways to differentiate when shelf space gets limited and retailers slow down on taking certain product classes.

 

Hourglass by Grapefruit commonly referred to as the Company’s “Patchless Patch” Cannabinoid Delivery System

 

The Company is currently manufacturing, marketing, and selling “Hourglass™” by Grapefruit, its patented time release THC + Cannabinoid delivery cream commonly referred to as the “Patchless Patch”. Due to complications beyond our control with our former licensed cannabis testing lab partner, CannaSafe, the Company was significantly delayed in its efforts to sell Hourglass into the retail marketplace. The Bureau of Cannabis Control shut down CannaSafe for issues that has nothing to do with the Company. However, CannaSafe was in the process of final regulatory testing for Hourglass when it was shut down. This, in turn, delayed our efforts and timeline to bring Hourglass to the retail marketplace. The Company was ultimately forced to seek out a new State Certified Laboratory and then had to start from ground zero working with the new laboratory’s science team to train them to properly test the Hourglass cream.

 

Hourglass provides users with a defined “time-released” amount of THC and CBD through the skin to provide the user with the full synergistic and holistic benefits of cannabis. Hourglass™ is an innovative THC and Cannabinoid delivery system that has solved the inherent difficulties of efficient skin absorption of THC and other cannabinoids. Grapefruit developed this innovative product as an efficient means to deliver THC to those who need it. Hourglass™ is currently available in licensed retail and mobile cannabis dispensaries in Los Angeles County, California, USA. Hourglass™ is not intended for use to cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent disease and we are not claiming otherwise.

 

7
 

 

The Company has also developed a 2018 Farm Bill compliant hemp based CBD version of Hourglass™. We anticipate that the CBD version of Hourglass will be retail ready for sale throughout the United States and Internationally in the second quarter of 2021. The 2018 Farm Bill compliant hemp version of Hourglass™ contains no THC whatsoever which allows for greater flexibility to market and sell this version in traditional sale’s channels. We anticipate that the CBD version of Hourglass will be widely distributed domestically because there is no Federal prohibition on CBD sales across state lines throughout the United States. The Hemp-derived version of Hourglass™ is not intended for use to cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent disease and we are not claiming otherwise.

 

Sugar Stoned

 

Grapefruit acquired the Sugar Stoned® brand in the winter of 2018 for use through the winter of 2021. We began the manufacturing process and research and development process for our products immediately, and recently began to sell and distribute Sugar Stoned branded products throughout California. Retail cannabis product consumers can purchase Sugar Stoned infused gummies that have been tested and are certified to be pesticide and heavy metal free by a third-party laboratory before being released at retail. Sugar Stoned brand is now a Grapefruit portfolio brand consisting of a premium quality cannabis infused gummy line with eight different flavors: Blue Raspberry, Cherry, Grape, Peach, Pineapple, Sour Apple, Strawberry and Watermelon.

 

Rainbow Dreams

 

Grapefruit recently launched a new life-style brand designed specifically for the recreational cannabis marketplace called “Rainbow Dreams.” The Rainbow Dreams brand captures the “anything goes party vibe” of the 1970s by offering an array of cannabis products such as a line of vape cartridges with unique cannabis strains combined with all natural flavors for a no-burn experience compared to the traditional or earlier generation cartridges which burn at much higher temperatures and provide the user with a burning sensation when inhaling. Rainbow Dreams fills a niche in the marketplace – a top shelf quality product line that we expect to be competitively priced. The Company made a strategic decision to delay the THC and CBD of infused gummies and mints due to saturation of the marketplace for these types of products.

 

The Company has manufactured an infused product known as “RSO”, which is commonly known as Rick Simpson Oil and is used in the medicinal marketplace. The Company’s RSO product line is currently being marketed to cannabis retailers.

 

Hourglass

 

Full Spectrum THC+ Cannabinoid Time Release Topical Delivery Cream provides users with a full body, synergistic entourage effect that was only available by smoking, vaping or consuming cannabis. This is the first and only patented Topical Cream that scientifically delivers the full effects of THC combined with a broad range of cannabinoids for your overall health, wellness, and well-being. Laboratory tested with complete results available on every package via a designated QR Code. There is no other topical cream product on the market with our patented and novel delivery technology that provides users with the holistic benefits of the entourage effect of THC+CBD, CBN, CBG, Delta8, THCV and CBE. Users will no longer be prevented from enjoying the many benefits of cannabis without eating an edible, using a tincture or lighting a joint, pipe or vape and will be able to discreetly apply additional cream for any desired effect. The Company is currently in the process of adapting our proprietary manufacturing protocols to our new hemp-derived CBD cream.

 

8
 

 

Intellectual Property

 

The Company filed trademark and service mark applications with the State of California to protect its Company name as well as its Rainbow Dreams and Sugar Stoned cannabis product names. The Company received the following Registration Statements from the California Secretary of State:

 

  1. On August 20, 2019, the Secretary of State of the State of California issued the Company its Registration of Service Mark, Registration No. Y1GZNV6, for its corporate name, Grapefruit, thereby protecting its Service Mark and line of business from other competitors within the industry. The term of the Grapefruit Service Mark Registration extends to and includes August 19, 2024.
     
  2. On August 20, 2019, the Secretary of State of the State of California issued to Grapefruit its Registration of Trademark, Registration No. Y3EMZM6, for its Rainbow Dreams cannabis products name under “Cartridges sold filled with cannabis infused natural flavorings in liquid form for electronic cigarettes.” The term of the Rainbow Dreams Trademark Registration extends to and includes August 19, 2024.
     
  3.

On August 21, 2019, the Secretary of State of the State of California issued to Grapefruit its Registration of Trademark, Verification No. Q6A98B3, for its Sugar Stoned cannabis product name under “Cannabis Infused Cookies and Candies.” The term of the Trademark Registration extends to and includes August 20, 2024.

 

4. On February 4, 2021, the Secretary of State of the State of California issued to Grapefruit its Registration of Trademark, Registration Nos. 02009331 and 02009332, for its Hourglass patented time release THC + Cannabinoid delivery cream under “Cannabis infused skin cream.” The term of the Trademark Registrations extends to and includes February 3, 2026.

 

The Company currently maintains a portfolio of trade secrets relating to the formulas for its CBD gummies, vaporization cartridges and oils as well as its proprietary manufacturing process for its Hourglass creams.

 

Tolling

 

We expect to enter into toll processing agreements by which cultivators will provide us with their dried biomass (i.e., Trim) which we then process at our extraction facility into finished distillate. In exchange, we provide 50% of the finished product to the cultivator. The cultivator is free to use our distribution service to sell their finished product or transfer the finished product to another distributor.

 

Packaging

 

We provide packaging services to re-integrate formally unlicensed products back into the legal marketplace. The space on packaging is limited due to compliance laws. We spend a significant amount of time working out these issues in a pre-production phase. Our goal is to keep a brand’s original design work while complying with al the government regulations. We devote serious efforts to re-brand an unlicensed product to quickly and efficiently re-integrate it into the retail space.

 

Marketing and Sales

 

We have retained employees with cannabis-related experience in product manufacturing, branding, marketing and retail sales in the State of California. We have a strategic relationship with a full service traditional and digital marketing agency that will promote our company and products. We have a multi-pronged approach to marketing our Company and its branded product lines: (1) social media – including Instagram, Facebook and Twitter; (2) influencers who are expected to promote our branded products directly to recreational cannabis users; (3) attendance at specific industry events that are designed to promote our company to both macro and micro targeted audiences; (4) targeted radio advertising designed to reach the recreational marketplace and static marketing (e.g., well placed bill board advertising); and (5) use of our sales force for the personal touch required to obtain shelf-space in all recreational and medicinal dispensaries.

 

The Company employs inside salespersons for retail, and outside salespeople for wholesale purchases. Additionally, the Company maintains an online digital platform where customers may purchase the Company’s products.

 

9
 

 

Sources and Availability of Raw Materials; Principal Suppliers

 

In general, raw materials essential to our business are readily available from multiple sources. So far, we have been able to source the materials required to manufacture our THC Distillate as well as our edibles and vape cartridges. Our products use both non-cannabis and cannabis raw materials. We have the entire United States for the sourcing non-cannabis raw materials – such as terpenes, which are the compounds from plant extracts that provide the unique flavor profile in cannabis products, and cells, which are the industry standard vaporization carts. The California cannabis marketplace is diverse, and we have developed the relationships with other companies to ensure the consistent availability of the raw materials.

 

Because we have no direct control over these suppliers, interruptions or delays in the products and services provided by these parties may be difficult to remedy in a timely fashion. In addition, if such suppliers are unable or unwilling to deliver the necessary products or raw materials, we may be unable to redesign or adapt our technology to work without such raw materials or products or find alternative suppliers or manufacturers. In such events, we could experience interruptions, delays, increased costs or quality control problems, or be unable to sell the applicable products, all of which could have a significant adverse impact on our revenue.

 

Competition

 

The cannabis industry is subject to significant competition and pricing pressures. We may experience significant competitive pricing pressures as well as competitive products and services providers. Several significant competitors may offer products and/or services with prices that may match or are lower than ours. We believe that the products and services we offer are generally competitive with those offered by other cannabis companies. It is possible that one or more of our competitors could develop a significant research advantage over us that allows them to provide superior products or pricing, which could put us at a competitive disadvantage. Continued pricing pressure or improvements in research and shifts in customer preferences away from natural supplements could adversely impact our customer base or pricing structure and have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

Additionally, CBD is a naturally occurring cannabinoid constituent of cannabis. It was discovered in 1940 and is known to exhibit neuroprotective properties in many experimental systems. However, development of CBD as a drug has been confounded by the following: 1) low potency; 2) a large number of molecular targets; 3) marginal pharmacokinetic properties; and 4) designation as a schedule 1 controlled substance. We view that companies specializing in the sale, distribution and manufacturing of CBD based products as some of our stronger competitors based on recent laws and regulatory schemes.

 

Government Approvals and Regulations

 

The formulation, manufacturing, processing, labelling, packaging, advertising and distribution of our products are subject to regulation by several federal agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”), the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”), the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (“USDA”) and the Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”). These activities are also regulated by various agencies of the states and localities in which our products are sold. The FDA regulates the processing, formulation, safety, manufacture, packaging, labelling and distribution of dietary supplements (including vitamins, minerals, and herbs) and cosmetics, whereas the FTC has jurisdiction to regulate the advertising of these products.

 

The FDA’s Good Manufacturing Practices (“GMP”) regulations require dietary supplements to be prepared, packaged and held in compliance with strict rules, and require quality control provisions similar to those in the GMP regulations for drugs. The FDA could in the future choose to inspect one of our facilities for compliance with these regulations and could cause non-compliant products made or held in the facility to be subject to FDA enforcement actions.

 

The FDA has broad authority to enforce the provisions of the FDCA and their regulation of foods, dietary supplements and cosmetics may increase or become more restrictive in the future. Additional legislation could be passed which would impose substantial new regulatory requirements for dietary supplements, potentially raising our costs and hindering our business. We do not believe our current products are subject to the FDCA as our products are not intended to cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent disease.

 

10
 

 

Our advertising is subject to regulation by the Federal Trade Commission, or FTC, under the Federal Trade Commission Act. In recent years the FTC has initiated numerous investigations of dietary supplement and weight loss products and companies. Additionally, some states also permit advertising and labelling laws to be enforced by private attorney generals, who may seek relief for consumers, seek class action certifications, seek class wide damages and product recalls of products sold by us. Any of these types of adverse actions against us by governmental authorities or private litigants could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

In addition to FDA and FTC regulations, our products may face further regulation under the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs 1961, which governs international trade and domestic control of narcotic substances including cannabis extracts. Countries may interpret and implement their treaty obligations in a way that creates a legal obstacle to our obtaining marketing approval for our products in those countries. These countries may not be willing or able to amend or otherwise modify their laws and regulations to permit our products to be marketed or achieving such amendments to the laws and regulations may take a prolonged period of time. In the case of countries with similar obstacles, we would be unable to market our product candidates in countries in the near future or perhaps at all if the laws and regulations in those countries do not change.

 

Additionally, the Company is also subject to California law regarding dissemination of information via advertising. Mainly, these rules and regulations relate to directing advertisements to people aged 21 years and older. The type of advertising the Company expects to conduct and pursue is similar to how alcohol companies direct their advertising and marketing efforts.

 

Controlled Substance Regulation

 

At some point our products may be developed and be subject to U.S. controlled substance laws and regulations and failure to comply with these laws and regulations, or the cost of compliance with these laws and regulations, may adversely affect the results of our business operations, both during clinical development and post approval, and our financial condition.

 

Certain products we may develop could contain controlled substances as defined in the federal Controlled Substances Act of 1970, or CSA. Controlled substances that are pharmaceutical products are subject to a high degree of regulation under the CSA, which establishes, among other things, certain registration, manufacturing quotas, security, recordkeeping, reporting, import, export and other requirements administered by the DEA. The DEA classifies controlled substances into five schedules: Schedule I, II, III, IV or V substances. Schedule I substances by definition have a high potential for abuse, not currently “accepted medical use” in the United States, lack accepted safety for use under medical supervision, and may not be prescribed, marketed or sold in the United States. Pharmaceutical products approved for use in the United States may be listed as Schedule II, III, IV or V, with Schedule II substances considered to present the highest potential for abuse or dependence and Schedule V substances the lowest relative risk of abuse among such substances. Schedule I and II drugs are subject to the strictest controls under the CSA, including manufacturing and procurement quotas, security requirements and criteria for importation. In addition, dispensing of Schedule II drugs is further restricted. For example, they may not be refilled without a new prescription. We do not intend to produce “controlled substances” at this time, due to regulatory complications.

 

Employees

 

As of December 31, 2020, we had 14 full-time employees. Grapefruit has 4 employees at its lab facilities. One of the lab employees is responsible for managing onsite operations at the Warehouse. Grapefruit has a total of 5 inside sales and branding employees as well as 2 employees for operational support. Finally, the Company has 3 outside salespeople located in Northern California. These salespeople are in charge of Grapefruit’s bulk flower and trim sales. Our employees are not represented by a labor union or other collective bargaining groups at this point in time, and we consider relations with our employees to be good. We currently plan to retain and utilize the services of outside consultants for additional research, testing, regulatory, legal compliance and other services on an as needed basis.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

Smaller reporting companies are not required to provide the information required by this item.

 

11
 

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

 

We own approximately two acres of real property located in the Coachillin’ Industrial Cultivation and Ancillary Canna-Business Park in Desert Hot Springs, located on the extension of North Canyon Rd., approximately 10 miles north of the center of Palm Springs. We intend on building a fully integrated distribution, manufacturing and cultivation facility to become a seed to sale, fully vertically integrated Cannabis and CBD product Company.

 

Additionally, our cannabis and CBD extraction laboratory and distribution facility are located in the same Canna-Business Park. On September 1, 2018, the Company entered into a three-year lease for approximately 2,268 square feet which commenced on March 1, 2018.

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

From time to time, we may become involved in lawsuits, investigations and claims that arise in the ordinary course of business. As of the date of this prospectus, we are not a party to any litigation whereby the outcome of such litigation, if determined adversely to us, would materially affect our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not applicable.

 

PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON STOCK, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS, AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Market Information

 

Our common stock trades on the OTC Pink marketplace owned by OTC Markets Group Inc. under the symbol “GPFT.” Any over-the-counter market quotations reflect inter-dealer prices, without retail markup, mark-down, or commission and may not necessarily represent actual transactions.

 

As of March 24, 2021, there were approximately 610 record holders of our common stock, not including shares held in “street name” in brokerage accounts which is unknown. As of March 24, 2021, there were 510,797,041 shares of our common stock outstanding on record. As of March 24, 2021, the Company has 1,000,000,000 shares of authorized common stock.

 

Dividends

 

We have not declared or paid any cash dividends on our common stock and do not anticipate paying dividends for the foreseeable future.

 

Stock Option Plan

 

During 2014, the Board of Directors adopted, and the shareholders approved, the 2014 Stock Option Plan under which a total of 1,811,401 shares of common stock had been reserved for issuance. The 2014 Stock Option Plan will terminate in September 2024.

 

Stock Options

 

As of December 31, 2020, former employees of the Company hold options to purchase 250,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $1.00.

 

Transactions in FY 2019   Quantity     Weighted-Average
Exercise Price
Per Share
    Weighted-Average
Remaining
Contractual Life
 
Outstanding, December 31, 2019     250,000     $ 1.00       5.57  
Granted                        
Exercised     -                  
Cancelled/Forfeited     -                  
Outstanding, December 31, 2020     250,000     $ 1.00       4.57  
Exercisable, December 31, 2020     250,000     $ 1.00       4.57  

 

The weighted average remaining contractual life of options outstanding issued under the Plan was 4.57 years at December 31, 2020.

 

12
 

 

Warrants

 

Following is a summary of warrants outstanding at December 31, 2020:

 

Number of Warrants     Exercise Price     Expiration Date
  37,500     $ 0.10     April 2022
  500,00     $ 0.10     August 2022
  575,000     $ 0.10     April 2023
  125,000     $ 0.10     May 2023
  162,500     $ 0.10     August 2023
  2,800,000     $ 0.40     May 2022
  302,776     $ 0.10     January 2024
  12,000,000     $ 0.10     March 2021
  2,160,000     $ 0.10     June 2021
  16,000,000     $ 0.125     May 2021
  15,000,000     $ 0.15     May 2021
  8,000,000     $ 0.25     May 2021

 

Grapefruit acquired warrants to issue common stock upon exercise in its acquisition of Imaging3, Inc. on July 10, 2019. As part of the SPA, the Company also issued 16,000,000 warrants to purchase 16,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.125 per share, 15,000,000 warrants to purchase 15,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.15 per share, 8,000,000 warrants to purchase 8,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.25 (collectively, the “Warrants”) per share for a period of two year from the date of issuance. The Warrants are “cash only” and are callable if Grapefruit stock trades on the OTCQB at 200% or more of a given exercise price for 5 consecutive days.

 

In the first quarter of 2021, Auctus exercised 2,000,000 warrants at $.125 in relation to the SPA. On April 15, 2021, the Company restructured a large majority of their convertible notes, and as part of the agreement an additional 20,000,000 warrants were issued with an exercise price of $0.075 per share. In relation to these 20,000,000 warrants, the holder may elect to receive warrant shares pursuant to a cashless exercise, in lieu of a cash exercise, equal to the value of this warrant.

  

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

Not applicable because we are a smaller reporting company.

 

13
 

 

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL AND CONDITION RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Cautionary Statements

 

This Form 10-K contains financial projections and other “forward-looking statements,” as that term is used in federal securities laws, about Grapefruit’s financial condition, results of operations and business. These statements include, among others, statements concerning the potential for revenues and expenses and other matters that are not historical facts. These statements may be made expressly in this Form 10-K. You can find many of these statements by looking for words such as “believes,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “estimates,” or similar expressions used in this Form 10-K. These forward-looking statements are subject to numerous assumptions, risks and uncertainties that may cause our actual results to be materially different from any future results expressed or implied by us in those statements. The most important facts that could prevent us from achieving our stated goals include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

  (a) volatility or decline of our stock price;
     
  (b) potential fluctuation in quarterly results;
     
  (c) our failure to earn revenues or profits;
     
  (d) inadequate capital to continue the business and barriers to raising the additional capital or to obtaining the financing needed to implement our business plans;
     
  (e) failure to make sales;
     
  (f) changes in demand for our products and services;
     
  (g) rapid and significant changes in markets;
     
   (h) litigation with or legal claims and allegations by outside parties, causing us to incur substantial losses and expenses;
     
  (i) insufficient revenues to cover operating costs;
     
  (j) dilution in the ownership of the Company through the issuance by us of additional securities and the conversion of outstanding warrants, notes and other securities;

 

We cannot assure that we will be profitable. We may not be able to develop, manage or market our products and services successfully. We may not be able to attract or retain qualified executives and technology personnel. We may not be able to obtain customers for our products or services. Our products and services may become obsolete. Government regulation may hinder our business. Additional dilution in outstanding stock ownership will be incurred due to the issuance or exercise of more shares, warrants and other convertible securities.

 

Because the statements are subject to risks and uncertainties, actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. We caution you not to place undue reliance on the statements, which speak only as of the date of this Form 10-K. The cautionary statements contained or referred to in this section should be considered in connection with any subsequent written or oral forward-looking statements that we or persons acting on our behalf may make. We do not undertake any obligation to review or confirm analysts’ expectations or estimates or to release publicly any revisions to any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this Form 10-K or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.

 

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and notes to those statements. In addition to historical information, the following discussion and other parts of this annual report contain forward-looking information that involves risks and uncertainties.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. We monitor our estimates on an on-going basis for changes in facts and circumstances, and material changes in these estimates could occur in the future. Changes in estimates are recorded in the period in which they become known. We base our estimates on historical experience and other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results may differ from our estimates if past experience or other assumptions do not turn out to be substantially accurate.

 

14
 

 

We have identified the policies below as critical to our business operations and the understanding of our results of operations.

 

Use of Estimates – The preparation of our financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires us to make estimates, assumptions and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities as of the date of our financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the periods presented.

 

We make our estimate of the ultimate outcome for these items based on historical trends and other information available when our financial statements are prepared. We recognize changes in estimates in accordance with the accounting rules for the estimate, which is typically in the period when new information becomes available. We believe that our significant estimates, assumptions and judgments are reasonable, based upon information available at the time they were made. Our actual results could differ from these estimates, making it possible that a change in these estimates could occur in the near term. The company’s most significant estimates related to useful life for depreciation, the value of long-lived assets and related impairment, and provision for income taxes of property and equipment.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments – We value our financial assets and liabilities using fair value measurements. Fair value is based on the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. Assets and liabilities measured at fair value are categorized based on whether the inputs are observable in the market and the degree that the inputs are observable. The categorization of financial instruments within the valuation hierarchy is based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. The hierarchy is prioritized into three levels (with Level 3 being the lowest) defined as follows:

 

Level 1: Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity has the ability to access.

 

Level 2: Observable inputs other than prices included in Level 1, such as quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets; quoted prices for identical or similar assets and liabilities in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated with observable market data.

 

Level 3: Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets and liabilities. This includes certain pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies, and similar techniques that use significant unobservable inputs.

 

The carrying amount of our cash and cash equivalents approximates fair value because of the short-term nature of the instruments. The carrying amount of our notes payable at December 31, 2020, approximates their fair values based on comparable borrowing rates available to the company. The Company evaluated the fair market value of LVCA using Level 3 inputs. From that measurement, the Company recorded an impairment of LVCA.

 

There have been no changes in Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3 categorizations and no changes in valuation techniques for these assets or liabilities for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019.

 

15
 

 

Inventory – Inventory is comprised of raw material, work in process and finished goods. The following sets forth selected items from our inventory for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

   

December 31,

2020

   

December 31,

2019

 
Raw material   $ 16,892       -  
Work in process     23,566       -  
Finished goods     461,657       263,985  
    $ 502,115     $ 263,985  

 

We periodically review the value of our inventory and provide a write-down of inventory based on our assessment of the market conditions. Any write-down is charged to cost of goods sold.

 

Property, Plant and Equipment, net – Our property and equipment are recorded at cost. Assets held under capital leases are capitalized at the commencement of the lease at the lower of the present value of minimum lease payments at the inception of the lease or fair value. Maintenance and repairs are expensed as incurred. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over estimated useful lives of four to seven years, and amortization is computed using the straight-line method over the life of the applicable lease. At the time of retirement or other disposition of property and equipment, the cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from our accounts and any resulting gain or loss is reflected in our consolidated statements of operations.

 

Land Improvements – Our land improvements are recorded at cost provided by our property association. These costs will continue to be capitalized until construction has been completed. Land improvements will not be depreciated after the construction has been completed by the property association.

 

Long-Lived Assets Impairment Assessment – Our long-lived assets are subject to an impairment test if there is an indicator of impairment. The carrying value and ultimate realization of these assets is dependent upon our estimates of future earnings and benefits that we expect to generate from their use. If our expectations of future results and cash flows are significantly diminished, other long-lived assets may be impaired and the resulting charge to operations may be material. When we determine that the carrying value of intangibles or other long-lived assets may not be recoverable based upon the existence of one or more indicators of impairment, we use the projected undiscounted cash flow method or realizable value to determine whether an impairment exists, and then measure the impairment using discounted cash flows.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company derives revenues from the sale of product in accordance to ASC Topic 606. Revenues are recognized when control of the promised goods or services is transferred to the customer in an amount that reflects the consideration the Company expects to be entitled to in exchange for transferring those goods or services.

 

Revenue is recognized based on the following five step model:

 

  - Identification of the contract with a customer
  - Identification of the performance obligations in the contract
  - Determination of the transaction price
  - Allocation of the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract
  - Recognition of revenue when, or as, the Company satisfies a performance obligation

 

16
 

 

Performance Obligations

 

Sales of products are recognized when all the following criteria are satisfied: (i) a contract with an end user exists which has commercial substance; (ii) it is probable the Company will collect the amount charged to the end user; and (iii) the Company has completed its performance obligation whereby the end user has obtained control of the product. A contract with commercial substance exists once the Company receives and accepts a purchase order or once it enters into a contract with an end user. If collectability is not probable, the sale is deferred and not recognized until collection is probable or payment is received. Control of products typically transfers when title and risk of ownership of the product has transferred to the customer. For contracts with multiple performance obligations, the Company allocates the total transaction price to each performance obligation in an amount based on the estimated relative standalone selling prices of the promised goods or services underlying each performance obligation. The Company uses an observable price to determine the stand-alone selling price for separate performance obligations or a cost-plus margin approach when one is not available. Historically the Company’s contracts have not had multiple performance obligations. The large majority of the Company’s performance obligations are recognized at a point in time related to the sale of products.

 

Cost of Goods Sold –Our cost of goods sold includes the costs directly attributable to revenue recognized and includes expenses related to the production, packaging and labelling of cannabis products; personnel-related costs, fees for third-party services, such as testing and transportation costs related to our distribution services.

 

Research and Development Expenses – Research and development (“R&D”) costs are charged to expense as incurred. Our R&D expenses include, but are not limited to, consulting service fees and materials and supplies used in the development of our proprietary products and services.

 

General and Administrative Expenses – General and administrative expenses consist primarily of personnel-related costs, fees for professional and consulting services, travel costs, rent, bad debt expense, general corporate costs, and other costs of administration such as human resources, finance and administrative roles.

 

Income Taxes – Income tax assets and liabilities are recorded using the asset and liability method. Under the asset and liability method, tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the tax consequences attributable to differences between financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases as well as net operating loss and tax credit carryovers. Future tax assets and liabilities are measured using the enacted tax rates expected to apply when the asset is realized, or the liability settled. The effect on future tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that enactment occurs. To the extent that we do not consider it more likely than not that a future tax asset will be recovered, we will provide a valuation allowance against the excess.

 

We follow the provisions of ASC 740, Income Taxes. Because of ASC 740, we make a comprehensive review of our portfolio of tax positions in accordance with recognition standards established by ASC 740.

 

When tax returns are filed, it is highly certain that some positions taken would be sustained upon examination by the taxing authorities, while others are subject to uncertainty about the merits of the position taken or the amount of the position that would be ultimately sustained. The benefit of a tax position is recognized in our consolidated financial statements in the period during which, based on all available evidence, we believe it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained upon examination, including the resolution of appeals or litigation processes, if any. Tax positions taken are not offset or aggregated with other positions. Tax positions that meet the more-likely-than-not recognition threshold are measured as the largest amount of tax benefit that is more than 50 percent likely of being realized upon settlement with the applicable taxing authority. The portion of the benefits associated with tax positions taken that exceeds the amount measured as described above is reflected as a liability for unrecognized tax benefits in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets along with any associated interest and penalties that would be payable to the taxing authorities upon examination.

 

We have created our tax provision leveraging known tax court cases involving various marijuana dispensaries and other cannabis related businesses, including the section of the IRS Tax code of 280E. The U.S. Tax Code Section 280E is the federal statute that states that a business engaging in the trafficking of a Schedule I or II controlled substance, which includes cannabis and cannabis related products, are barred from taking the tax deductions or credits in their federal tax returns which are not considered as part of the business’ cost of goods sold. Given the guidance offered by the Tax code 280E we have prepared our tax provision according to this tax code.

 

Interest and penalties associated with unrecognized tax benefits, if any, are classified as interest expense and penalties and are included in selling, general and administrative expenses in our consolidated statements of operations.

 

17
 

 

On December 22, 2017, the U.S. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act was enacted. U.S. tax reform introduced many changes, including lowering the U.S. corporate tax rate to 21 percent, changes in incentives, provisions to prevent U.S. base erosion and significant changes in the taxation of international income, including provisions which allow for the repatriation of foreign earnings without U.S. tax. The enactment of U.S. tax reform had no significant impact on our income taxes for the year ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

Commitments and Contingencies – Certain conditions may exist as of the date our financial statements are issued, which may result in a loss, but which will only be resolved when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. We assess such contingent liabilities, and such assessment inherently involves an exercise of judgment. In assessing loss contingencies related to legal proceedings that are pending against us or unasserted claims that may result in such proceedings, we evaluate the perceived merits of the legal proceedings or unasserted claims as well as the perceived merits of the amount of relief sought or expected to be sought.

 

If the assessment of a contingency indicates that it is probable that a material loss has been incurred and the amount of the liability can be estimated, the estimated liability would be accrued in our consolidated financial statements. If the assessment indicates that a potentially material loss contingency is not probable, but is reasonably possible, or is probable but cannot be estimated, then the nature of the contingent liability, together with an estimate of the range of possible loss if determinable and material, would be disclosed.

 

Loss contingencies considered remote are generally not disclosed unless they involve guarantees, in which case the nature of the guarantee would be disclosed.

 

Net Loss Per Share – We compute net loss per share in accordance with ASC 260, Earnings per Share. Under the provisions of ASC 260, basic net loss per share includes no dilution and is computed by dividing the net loss available to common stockholders for the period by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Diluted net loss per share takes into consideration shares of common stock outstanding (computed under basic net loss per share) and potentially dilutive securities that are not anti-dilutive.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents – The Company considers all highly liquid investment securities with remaining maturities at the date of purchase of three months or less to be cash equivalents. Cash equivalents may be invested in money market funds, certificates of deposit or other interest-bearing accounts.

 

Concentration of Credit Risk – Financial instruments that potentially subject us to credit risk consist of cash. We maintain our cash with high credit quality financial institutions; at times, such balances with any one financial institution may not be insured by the FDIC.

 

Accounts Receivable and Revenue – The accounts receivable balance was $39,480 as of December 31, 2020 and $0 as of December 31, 2019.In 2020, 99% of accounts receivable consisted of one customer. In 2020, 63% of the net revenues generated with two customers. In 2019, 70% of net revenues generated were the result of transactions with one customer.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements – From time to time, the FASB or other standards setting bodies issue new accounting pronouncements. Updates to the FASB ASCs are communicated through issuance of an Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”). Unless otherwise discussed, we believe that the impact of recently issued guidance, whether adopted or to be adopted in the future, is not expected to have a material impact on our condensed consolidated financial statements upon adoption.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Adopted

 

In August 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-06, “Debt with Conversion and Other Options (Subtopic 470-20) and Derivatives and Hedging—Contracts in Entity’s Own Equity (Subtopic 815-40): Accounting for Convertible Instruments and Contracts in an Entity’s Own Equity”. ASU 2020-06 reduces the number of accounting models for convertible debt instruments and convertible preferred stock. Limiting the accounting models results in fewer embedded conversion features being separately recognized from the host contract as compared with current GAAP. ASU 2020-06 amends the guidance for the derivatives scope exception for contracts in an entity’s own equity to reduce form-over-substance-based accounting conclusions. ASU 2020-06 is effective for the Company for annual and interim reporting periods beginning December 15, 2021. The Company is currently evaluating the impact ASU 2018-13 will have on its financial statements.

 

18
 

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements Adopted

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, “Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework—Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement” (“ASU 2018-13”). ASU 2018-13 removes, modifies and adds certain disclosure requirements in Topic 820 “Fair Value Measurement”. ASU 2018-13 eliminates certain disclosures related to transfers and the valuations process, modifies disclosures for investments that are valued based on net asset value, clarifies the measurement uncertainty disclosure, and requires additional disclosures for Level 3 fair value measurements. ASU 2018-13 became effective for the Company in the third quarter of 2020 and had no impact on the financial statements

 

Company performs ongoing credit evaluations of its customers and historic credit losses have been within management’s expectations. The Company has a revenue receivables policy for service and warranty contracts. Equipment sales usually have a one-year warranty of parts and service. After a one-year period, the Company contacts the buyer to initiate the sale of a new warranty contract for one year. Warranty revenues are deferred and recognized on a straight-line basis over the term of the contract or as services are performed.

 

Other Accounting Factors

 

The effects of inflation have not had a material impact on our operation, nor are they expected to in the immediate future.

 

Results of Operations for the Year Ended December 31, 2020 as compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2019.

 

The following sets forth selected items from our statements of operations for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019.

 

    Year Ended     Year Ended  
    December 31, 2020     December 31, 2019  
Net revenues   $ 3,672,353     $ 451,196  
Cost of goods sold     3,391,888       708,567  
Gross profit (loss)     280,465       (257,371 )
Sales expense     169,350       -  
General and administrative expense     1,317,327       1,618,981  
Loss from operations     (1,206,212 )     (1,876,352 )
Change in value of derivatives     (40,394,176 )     (1,626,634 )
Gain (loss) on extinguishment of debt     39,640,477       (355,700 )
Interest and other income (expense)     (2,097,085 )     (740,879 )
Net income attributable to noncontrolling interest     -       (9,468 )
Net loss   $ (4,056,996 )   $ (4,609,033 )

 

Revenue for the year ended December 31, 2020 was $3,672,353 compared to $451,196 for the corresponding year in 2019, an increase of $3,221,157, or 714%. The increase was primarily due to the ability of management to focus on its business plan for an entire year, as compared with the prior year in which management effectuated the reverse merger. During the fourth quarter of 2020, the company introduced its new HourGlass product, a full spectrum THC+ cannabinoid time release topical delivery cream, from which we expect continued significant growth in revenues in 2021.

 

19
 

 

Cost of goods sold for the year ended December 31, 2020 were $3,391,888 as compared to $708,567 for the corresponding year in 2019, an increase of $2,668,122, or 369%. Included in cost of goods sold for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 are plant operation and other direct overhead expenses incurred to maintain our production facilities. These fixed carrying costs affect our gross margin more significantly at lower revenues than at our anticipated full operating activity levels. Consequently, we expect our gross margins to significantly improve in 2021. For the year ended December 31, 2020, our revenue ramp resulted in increased sales to more than cover those fixed costs resulting in a positive gross profit, while in 2019, when the Company had just begun processing product and incurred the additional fixed costs for running, maintaining and financing the warehouse and extraction facility.

 

Our resulting gross profit (loss) for the year ended December 31, 2020 was $280,465 compared with $(257,371) for the year ended December 31, 2019, an increase of $553,036, or 203%.

 

Our sales expenses for the year ended December 31, 2020 was $169,350 compared to $0 for the corresponding period in 2019. As management focused on growth and development of new products, the Company hired additional employees to focus on sales.

 

Our general and administrative expenses for the year ended December 31, 2020 was $1,317,327 compared to $1,618,981 for 2019, a decrease of $117,105, or 7%. The decrease in costs are primarily due to the cost of the reverse merger incurred in 2019.

 

Our resulting net loss from operations for the year ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 were $1,206,212 and $1,876,352, respectively, an improvement of $670,140, or 36%.

 

As part of the reverse merger in July 2019, the Company acquired derivative liabilities substantially in the form of convertible notes and related warrants with variable conversion features. On April 15, 2021, the company renegotiated the debt agreement with the lender modifying the convertible notes conversion price from a variable rate to a fixed rate conversion price for $4,502,750 of convertible notes, with an effective date of December 31, 2020. As a result of the agreement, the Company recorded a noncash expense for the change in the value of derivative instruments of $40,372,883, which was simultaneously offset by a noncash gain of $39,640,477 from the extinguishment of debt, resulting a net loss of $753,699 from the renegotiation of the debt. (See Note 14 to financial statements.)

 

During the year ended December 31, 2020, we recorded a loss on the change in the value of derivatives of $40,394,176 compared to the $1,626,634 loss in 2019. Future gains or losses related to the change in the value of derivatives will be minimal after renegotiating the terms of the convertible notes.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Our cash position increased to $299,895 as of December 31, 2020 from $266,607 as of December 31, 2019. The increase in cash was primarily due to the issuance of debt offset by operating activities. Our total current assets increased to $948,862 as of December 31, 2020, from $543,051 as of December 31, 2019.

 

Our total current liabilities decreased to $4,379,581 as of December 31, 2020 from $5,115,438 as of December 31, 2019. This decrease is primarily due to the modified conversion price of the convertible notes and elimination of the related derivatives.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2020, we used $1,625,908 of net cash for operating activities, as compared to cash used by operations of $1,307,990 used during the year ended December 31, 2019. Net cash used in investing activities during the year ended December 31, 2020 was $30,926, as compared to $481,515 during the year ended December 31, 2019. Net cash provided by financing activities during the year ended December 31, 2020 was $1,690,122, as compared to $1,990,190 during the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

We expect our working capital requirements in the next year to be met primarily by the proceeds of issuance of debt, equity and other securities to our existing creditor, shareholders, and other investors, as well as from cash flow from operations. We expect to need additional working capital from outside sources to cover our anticipated operating expenses. There is no assurance that the Company will be able to raise sufficient additional capital or financing to continue in business or to effectively execute its business plan.

 

Going Concern Qualification

 

Our consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis which assumes we will be able to realize our assets and discharge our liabilities in the normal course of business for the foreseeable future. During the year ended December 31, 2020, we incurred a net loss of $4,056,955, had a working capital deficit of $3,430,719 and had an accumulated deficit of $11,494,349 at December 31, 2020. Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon our ability to generate profitable operations in the future and, or, obtaining the necessary financing to meet our obligations and repay our liabilities arising from normal business operations as they come due. There is no assurance that these events will be satisfactorily completed. As a result, there is doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern for one year from the issuance date of these financial statements.

 

20
 

 

Management’s plan regarding this matter is to, amongst other things, seek additional equity financing by selling our equity securities and obtaining funds through the issuance of debt. We cannot be certain that funds from these sources will be available when needed or, if available, will be on terms favorable to us or to our stockholders. If we raise additional funds or settle liabilities by issuing equity securities, the percentage ownership of our stockholders may be reduced, stockholders may experience additional dilution, or such equity securities may provide for rights, preferences and/or privileges senior to those of the holders of our common stock. Our ability to execute our business plan and continue as a going concern may be adversely affected if we are unable to raise additional capital or operate profitably.

 

On July 10, 2019, Grapefruit USA, Inc. and Imaging3, Inc. (“IGNG”) closed a Share Exchange after the completion of all conditions subsequent contemplated by the Share Exchange Agreement among the parties thereto (the “SEA”), by which IGNG was acquired in a reverse acquisition (the “Acquisition”) by the former shareholders of Grapefruit Boulevard Investments, Inc (“Grapefruit). Under the terms of the SEA executed on May 31, 2019 IGNG became obligated to issue to Grapefruit’s existing shareholders that number of newly issued restricted IGNG common shares such that the former Grapefruit shareholders (now new IGNG shareholders) own approximately 81% of the post-Acquisition IGNG common shares and the current IGNG shareholders retain approximately 19% of the post-Acquisition IGNG common shares.

 

In connection with and dependent upon the successful consummation of the above transaction, on May 31, 2019, the Company executed the SPA with Auctus pursuant to the terms of which the Company agreed to sell $4,000,000 of the Notes and issue $6,200,000 of callable warrants (the “Warrants” and, together with the Notes, the “Securities”) to Auctus. Auctus is the Selling Security Holder. In addition, on May 31, 2019, we also entered into a registration rights agreement with Auctus (the “Registration Rights Agreement”) whereby we are obligated to file a registration statement to register the resale of the shares underlying the Securities. On July 25, 2019 (as amended on January 17, 2020), a registration statement was filed to comply with the Registration Rights Agreement . Pursuant to the SPA, Auctus became obligated to purchase the $4,000,000 of Notes from Grapefruit in four tranches as follows: $600,000 at the SPA closing, which was funded on June 6, 2019; the second tranche of $1,422,750 on the day IGNG filed the registration statement, which was funded on August 16, 2019; the third tranche of $1,030,000 was funded the day the SEC declares the registration statement effective and the fourth tranche of $1 million was funded 90 days after effectiveness. As of December 31, 2020, all tranches of this financing were completed. The Company has received gross proceeds of $4,052,750.

 

In the first quarter of 2021, Auctus exercised 2,000,000 warrants at $.125 in relation to the “SPA.” In addition, the company issued a $450,000 convertible to Auctus bearing 12% interest and 2-year maturity date. Principal payments shall be made in six (6) installments each in the amount of $75,000 commencing one hundred and eighty (180) days following the Issue Date and continuing thereafter each thirty (30) days for six (6) months. Notwithstanding the forgoing, the final payment of Principal and Interest shall be due on the Maturity Date. The conversion price is the lower of (i) the lowest trading price prior to the date of the note or (ii) the volume weighted average price for the 5 days prior to conversion. (Item 14. Subsequent Events)

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

None.

 

21
 

 

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

GRAPEFRUIT USA, INC.

 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 and 2019

 

CONTENTS

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm 23
   
Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019 24
   
Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019 25
   
Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019 26
   
Statement of Stockholders’ Deficit for the years ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019 27
   
Notes to Financial Statements 28

 

22
 

 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of

Grapefruit USA, Inc.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying balance sheets of Grapefruit USA, Inc. and its subsidiary (“the Company”) as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019 and the related statements of operations, stockholders’ deficit, cash flow and the related notes to consolidated financial statements (collectively referred to as the consolidated financial statements) for the year ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019. In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company at December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the years then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s consolidated financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audit included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

The Company’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 8 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company has an accumulated deficit, recurring losses, and expects continuing future losses, and has stated that substantial doubt exists about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s evaluation of the events and conditions and management’s plans regarding these matters are also described in Note 7. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

The firm has served this client since January 2020.

 

/s/ L&L CPAS, PA

L&L CPAS, PA

Certified Public Accountants Plantation, FL

The United States of America A

April 19, 2021

 

 

23
 

 

GRAPEFRUIT USA, INC.

BALANCE SHEETS

AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND DECEMBER 31, 2019

 

    December 31, 2020     December 31, 2019  
ASSETS                
                 
CURRENT ASSETS:                
Cash   $ 299,895     $ 266,607  
Accounts receivable     39,408       -  
Inventory     502,115       263,985  

Licensee Agreement

   

63,800

         
Other     43,644       12,459  
Total current assets     948,862       543,051  
NON-CURRENT ASSETS:                
Property, plant and equipment, net     1,790,930       1,809,326  
Operating right of use - assets     131,786       219,961  
Investment in hemp     169,950       169,950  
Other     7,459       -  
TOTAL ASSETS   $ 3,048,987     $ 2,742,288  
                 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT                
                 
CURRENT LIABILITIES                
Notes payable   $ 256,436     $ 351,569  
Accrued loan interest     758,107       398,720  
Related party payable     488,433       281,626  
Legal settlements - current portion     180,740       159,543  
Subscription payable     791,992       891,738  
Derivative liability     118,641       1,433,597  
Capital lease - current portion     67,071       55,565  
Operating right of use - liability - current portion     82,038       98,031  
Convertible notes - current portion     829,072       371,173  
Accounts payable and accrued expenses     807,051       1,073,876  
Total current liabilities     4,379,581       5,115,438  
                 
Legal settlements - long-term     29,226       50,659  
Capital lease     38,835       106,005  
Operating right of use - liability     52,724       123,210  
Long-term notes payable, net     904,633       866,700  
Long-term convertible notes, net of discount     2,323,735       914,303  
Total long-term liabilities     3,349,153       2,060,877  
                 
TOTAL LIABILITIES     7,728,734       7,176,315  
                 
STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT                
                 
Stock compensation for non-employee     -       (244,167 )
Common stock ($0.0001 par value, 1,000,000,000 shares authorized; 505,700,437 and 486,320,329 shares issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively)     50,570       48,632  
Preferred stock ($0.0001 par value, 1,000,000 shares authorized; no shares issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2020 and 2019)     -       -  
Additional paid in capital    

6,591,177

      3,026,006  
Accumulated deficit     (11,321,494 )     (7,264,498 )
Total stockholders’ deficit     (4,679,747 )     (4,434,027 )
 TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLERS’ DEFICIT   $ 3,048,987     $ 2,742,288  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated audited financial statements.

 

24
 

 

GRAPEFRUIT USA, INC.

STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND DECEMBER 31, 2019

 

    Twelve months ended     Twelve months ended  
    December 31, 2020     December 31, 2019  
Revenues                
Bulk sales   $ 3,667,164     $ 442,355  
Distribution services     5,189       8,841  
Total revenues     3,672,353       451,196  
Cost of goods sold     3,391,888       708,567  
Gross profit (loss)     280,465       (257,371 )
Operating expenses:                
Sales     169,350       -  
General and administrative     1,317,327       1,618,981  
Total operating expenses     1,486,677       1,618,981  
                 
Loss from operations     (1,206,212 )     (1,876,352 )
Other income (expense):                
Interest expense     (2,097,085 )     (571,047 )
Change in value of derivative instruments     (40,394,176 )     (1,626,634 )
Gain (loss) on extinguishment of debt     39,640,477       (355,700 )
Impairment charge - LVCA     -       (169,832 )
Total other income (expense)     (2,850,784 )     (2,723,213 )
                 
Income (loss) before income taxes     (4,056,996 )     (4,599,565 )
                 
Tax provision     -       -  
                 
Net income (loss)     (4,056,996 )     (4,599,565 )
                 
Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests     -       (9,468 )
                 
Net income (loss) attributable to Grapefruit USA, Inc.   $ (4,056,996 )   $ (4,609,033 )
                 
Net loss per share - Basic and diluted   $ (0.01 )   $ (0.03 )
Weighted average common stock outstanding - Basic and diluted     498,230,051       140,042,737  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated audited financial statements.

 

25
 

 

GRAPEFRUIT USA, INC.

STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND DECEMBER 31, 2019

 

    Twelve months
ended
    Twelve months
ended
 
    December 31,
2020
    December 31,
2019
 
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:                
Net loss   $ (4,056,996 )   $ (4,609,033 )
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used for operating activities:                
Depreciation and amortization expense     82,889       62,699  
Fixed asset deposit forfeiture     -       97,000  
Amortization/acquisition of right of use asset     88,175       (219,961 )
Change in value of derivative     40,394,176     1,626,634  
Non-cash interest     1,576,091       289,009  
(Gain) Loss on extinguishment of debt     (39,640,477 )      355,700  
Stock-based compensation for services     244,167       138,333  
Loss on investment in LVCA             169,832  
Changes in operation assets and liabilities:                
Accounts Receivables     (39,408 )     -  
Inventory     (238,130 )     (263,985 )
Other     (102,443 )     (8,636 )
Legal settlement             (69,370 )
Accounts payable and accrued expenses     (293,339 )     953,511  
Accrued loan interest expense     359,387       170,277  
Net cash used for used for operating activities     (1,625,908 )     (1,307,990 )
                 
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:                
Purchase of land and equipment     (30,926 )     (293,765 )
Investment in joint venture     -       (169,950 )
Capitalized expenses in LVCA     -       (17,800 )
Net cash used for investing activities     (30,926 )     (481,515 )
                 
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:                
Principal repayment of capital lease liability     (55,665 )     (40,120 )
Reduction/acquisition of right of use liability     (86,479 )     221,241  
Proceeds from convertible notes, net     1,727,264       1,472,500  
Proceeds from loans, net     105,002       101,569  
Proceeds from issuance of stock             235,000  
Net cash proceeds from financing activities     1,690,122       1,990,190  
                 
NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH     33,288       200,685  
                 
CASH, BEGINNING BALANCE     266,607       65,922  
                 
CASH, ENDING BALANCE   $ 299,895     $ 266,607  
                 
SUPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE ON NON-CASH FINANCING ACTIVITY                
Cash paid for interest expense     185,820       146,503  
Debt converted to common stock     640,597       -  
Compensation paid through issuance of common stock     347,792       137,883  
Notes and accrued interest converted to common stock     79,754       429,843  
Capitalization of interest for land improvements             150,827  
Reclassification of derivative liabilities to APIC     423,340       1,890,461  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated audited financial statements.

 

26
 

 

GRAPEFRUIT USA, INC.

STATEMENT OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND DECEMBER 31, 2019

 

    Equity (Deficit) Attributable to Grapefruit USA, Inc.              
                                           
            Total            
    Common Stock     Additional         Stockholders’     Non-     Total  
   

Number of

Shares

    Amount     Paid in
Capital
   

Accumulated

Deficit

    Equity
(Deficit)
   

controlling

Interest

    Equity
(Deficit)
 
                                           
Balance as of December 31, 2018     362,979,119       36,298       2,813,701       (2,655,465 )     194,534       15,085       209,619  
                                                         
Reorganization due to Recapitalization     97,393,688       9,739       (4,442,133 )     -       (4,432,394 )     -       (4,432,394 )
                                                         
Shares issued for cash                     235,000               235,000       -       235,000  
                                                         
Shares from the conversion of notes     9,947,842       995       429,837       -       430,832       -       430,832  
                                                         
Shares issued for services     5,500,000       550       206,950       -       207,500       -       207,500  
                                                         
Shares issued for Settlement     10,499,680       1,050       1,648,023       -       1,649,073       -       1,649,073  
                                                         
Reclassification of derivative liability associated with debt conversion     -       -       1,890,461       -       1,890,461       -       1,890,461  
                                                         
Noncontrolling interest LVCA     -       -       -       -       -       (15,085 )     (15,085 )
                                                         
Net loss     -       -       -       (4,609,033 )     (4,609,033 )     -       (4,609,033 )
                                                         
Balance as of December 31, 2019     486,320,329     $ 48,632     $ 2,781,839     $ (7,264,498 )   $ (4,434,027 )   $ -     $ (4,434,027 )
                                                         
Shares issued for services     1,150,000       115     287,917       -       288,032       -       288,032  
                                                         
Shares issued for license agreement     1,000,000       100       15,900       -       16,000       -       16,000  
                                                         
Shares issued for settlement     7,213,933       721       565,572       -       566,293       -       566,293  
                                                         
Shares issued with debt     915,795       92       44,782       -       44,874       -       44,874  
                                                         
 Shares from the conversion of notes     9,100,380       910       79,844       -       80,754       -       80,754  
                                                         
Reclassification from derivative liability             -       423,340       -       423,340       -       423,340  
                                                         
Beneficial conversion feature related to warrants                     2,391,983       -       2,391,983       -       2,391,983  
                                                         
Net loss     -       -       -       (4,056,996 )     (4,056,996 )     -       (4,056,996 )
                                                         
Balance as of December 31, 2020     505,700,437     $ 50,570     $ 6,591,177     $ (11,321,494 )   $ (4,679,747 )   $ -     $ (4,679,747 )

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated audited financial statements.

 

27
 

 

GRAPEFRUIT USA, INC.

Notes to Financial Statements

 

1. ORGANIZATION AND DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS

 

Grapefruit USA, Inc (“we”, “our”, “us”, “GBI”, “Grapefruit”, or “the Company”) was formed as a California corporation on August 28, 2017 and began operating in September 2017.

 

On July 10, 2019, Grapefruit closed the Share Exchange after the completion of all conditions subsequent contemplated by the Share Exchange Agreement among the parties thereto ( “SEA”), by which Imaging3, Inc. (“IGNG”) was acquired in a reverse acquisition (the “Acquisition”) by the former shareholders of Grapefruit, the accounting acquirer. Under the terms of the SEA executed on May 31, 2019, IGNG became obligated to issue to Grapefruit’s existing shareholders that number of newly issued restricted IGNG common shares such that the former Grapefruit shareholders (now new IGNG shareholders) will own approximately 81% of the post-Acquisition IGNG common shares and the current IGNG shareholders will retain 19% of the post-Acquisition IGNG common shares. At the time of the execution of the SEA, IGNG had approximately 85,218,249 outstanding shares of common stock. Therefore, IGNG issued to Grapefruit’s shareholders 362,979,114 IGNG common shares to Grapefruit’s current shareholder on a pro rata basis with their then-current ownership of Grapefruit of which Bradley Yourist and Daniel J. Yourist own a combined 72.26%, or approximately 259,967,136 shares. Accordingly, the financial statements are prepared using the acquisition method of accounting with GBI as the accounting acquirer and IGNG treated as the legal acquirer and accounting acquiree. Because Imaging3, Inc. did not meet the accounting definition of an operating business, having only nominal assets, the reverse merger transaction was treated as a recapitalization and no goodwill was recognized.

 

The Company has applied for and received our provisional distribution renewal licensure which allows us to operate through May 13, 2021. Our annual manufacturing license has been renewed by the California Department of Health. Grapefruit has not yet applied for a license to cultivate and will not until construction has begun on our cultivation facility. We own two acres of fully entitled cannabis real property located in the Coachillin’ Industrial Cultivation and Ancillary Canna-Business Park. The location within Coachillin’ allows the Company to apply for and hold every cannabis license available under the California Cannabis laws.

 

We intend on building out the real property into a distribution, manufacturing and high-tech cultivation facility to further its goal to become a seed to sale, fully vertically integrated Cannabis and CBD product Company. Grapefruit’s plans include an indoor 22,000 square foot multi-tiered canopy and adjoining tissue culture rooms.

 

We became members of the Indian Canyon and 18th Property Association on September 19, 2017 and have an ownership interest of 1.46% based upon the 77,156 gross parcel square foot of our property located in an approximately 5.3 million square foot facility. As of December 31, 2020, the common areas continue to be built throughout the entire canna-business park and are not complete.

 

2. BASIS OF PRESENTATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles (“U.S. GAAP”).

 

The audited financial statements as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, and for the year ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States for interim financial information on the same basis as the annual financial statements and in the opinion of management, reflect all adjustments, which include only normal recurring adjustments, necessary to present fairly the Company’s financial position, results of operations and cash flows for the periods shown. The results of operations for such periods are not necessarily indicative of the results expected for a full year or for any future period. They do not include all of the information and footnotes required by GAAP for complete financial statements. Therefore, these financial statements should be read in conjunction with the Company’s audited financial statements and notes filed with the SEC for the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

28
 

 

Use of Estimates – The preparation of our financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires us to make estimates, assumptions and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities as of the date of our financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the periods presented.

 

We make our estimate of the ultimate outcome for these items based on historical trends and other information available when our financial statements are prepared. We recognize changes in estimates in accordance with the accounting rules for the estimate, which is typically in the period when new information becomes available. We believe that our significant estimates, assumptions and judgments are reasonable, based upon information available at the time they were made. Our actual results could differ from these estimates, making it possible that a change in these estimates could occur in the near term. The company’s most significant estimates related to useful life for depreciation, the value of long-lived assets and related impairment, and provision for income taxes of property and equipment.

 

Inventory – Inventory is comprised of raw material, work in process and finished goods. The following sets forth selected items from our inventory for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

    December 31,
2020
    December 31,
2019
 
Raw material   $ 16,892       -  
Work in process     23,566       -  
Finished goods     461,657       263,985  
    $ 502,115     $ 263,985  

 

We periodically review the value of our inventory and provide a write-down of inventory based on our assessment of the market conditions. Any write-down is charged to cost of goods sold.

 

Property, Plant and Equipment, net – Our property and equipment are recorded at cost. Assets held under capital leases are capitalized at the commencement of the lease at the lower of the present value of minimum lease payments at the inception of the lease or fair value. Maintenance and repairs are expensed as incurred. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over estimated useful lives of four to seven years, and amortization is computed using the straight-line method over the life of the applicable lease. At the time of retirement or other disposition of property and equipment, the cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from our accounts and any resulting gain or loss is reflected in our consolidated statements of operations.

 

Land Improvements – Our land improvements are recorded at cost provided by our property association. These costs will continue to be capitalized until construction has been completed. Land improvements will not be depreciated after the construction has been completed by the property association.

 

Long-Lived Assets Impairment Assessment – Our long-lived assets are subject to an impairment test if there is an indicator of impairment. The carrying value and ultimate realization of these assets is dependent upon our estimates of future earnings and benefits that we expect to generate from their use. If our expectations of future results and cash flows are significantly diminished, other long-lived assets may be impaired and the resulting charge to operations may be material. When we determine that the carrying value of intangibles or other long-lived assets may not be recoverable based upon the existence of one or more indicators of impairment, we use the projected undiscounted cash flow method or realizable value to determine whether an impairment exists, and then measure the impairment using discounted cash flows.

 

29
 

 

Revenue Recognition – The Company derives revenues from the sale of product in accordance to ASC Topic 606. Revenues are recognized when control of the promised goods or services is transferred to the customer in an amount that reflects the consideration the Company expects to be entitled to in exchange for transferring those goods or services.

 

Revenue is recognized based on the following five step model:

 

  - Identification of the contract with a customer
  - Identification of the performance obligations in the contract
  - Determination of the transaction price
  - Allocation of the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract
  - Recognition of revenue when, or as, the Company satisfies a performance obligation

 

Performance Obligations

 

Sales of products are recognized when all the following criteria are satisfied: (i) a contract with an end user exists which has commercial substance; (ii) it is probable the Company will collect the amount charged to the end user; and (iii) the Company has completed its performance obligation whereby the end user has obtained control of the product. A contract with commercial substance exists once the Company receives and accepts a purchase order or once it enters into a contract with an end user. If collectability is not probable, the sale is deferred and not recognized until collection is probable or payment is received. Control of products typically transfers when title and risk of ownership of the product has transferred to the customer. For contracts with multiple performance obligations, the Company allocates the total transaction price to each performance obligation in an amount based on the estimated relative standalone selling prices of the promised goods or services underlying each performance obligation. The Company uses an observable price to determine the stand-alone selling price for separate performance obligations or a cost-plus margin approach when one is not available. Historically the Company’s contracts have not had multiple performance obligations. The large majority of the Company’s performance obligations are recognized at a point in time related to the sale of products.

 

Cost of Goods Sold – Our cost of goods sold includes the costs directly attributable to revenue recognized and includes expenses related to the production, packaging and labelling of cannabis products; personnel-related costs, fees for third-party services, such as testing and transportation costs related to our distribution services.

 

Basic and Diluted Net Income Per Share – Basic net income per share is based upon the weighted average number of common shares outstanding. Diluted net income per share assumes that all dilutive convertible shares and stock options were converted or exercised. Dilution is computed by applying the treasury stock method. Under this method, options and warrants are assumed to be exercised at the beginning of the period (or at the time of issuance, if later), and as if funds obtained thereby were used to purchase common stock at the average market price during the period. During 2019, potentially dilutive securities were excluded from the computation of weighted average shares outstanding-diluted because their effect was anti-dilutive.

 

    December 31, 2020     December 31, 2019  
Numerator:                
Net income attributable to common shareholders   $ (4,229,851 )     (4,609,033 )
Denominator:                
Weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period     498,230,051       140,042,737  
Dilutive effect of stock options, warrants, and convertible promissory notes     -       -  
Common stock and common stock equivalents used for diluted earnings per share   $ 498,230,051     $ 140,042,737  

 

Derivative Financial Instruments - The Company generally does not use derivative financial instruments to hedge exposures to cash-flow risks or market-risks that may affect the fair values of its financial instruments. The Company utilizes various types of financing to fund its business needs, including convertible notes and warrants and other instruments not indexed to our stock. The Company is required to record its derivative instruments at their fair value. Changes in the fair value of derivatives are recognized in earnings in accordance with ASC 815. The Company’s only asset or liability measured at fair value on a recurring basis is its derivative liability associated with warrants to purchase common stock and convertible notes.

 

30
 

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments – We value our financial assets and liabilities using fair value measurements. Fair value is based on the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. Assets and liabilities measured at fair value are categorized based on whether the inputs are observable in the market and the degree that the inputs are observable. The categorization of financial instruments within the valuation hierarchy is based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. The hierarchy is prioritized into three levels (with Level 3 being the lowest) defined as follows:

 

Level 1: Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity has the ability to access.

 

Level 2: Observable inputs other than prices included in Level 1, such as quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets; quoted prices for identical or similar assets and liabilities in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated with observable market data.

 

Level 3: Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets and liabilities. This includes certain pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies, and similar techniques that use significant unobservable inputs.

 

The carrying amount of our cash and cash equivalents approximates fair value because of the short-term nature of the instruments. The carrying amount of our notes payable at December 31, 2019, approximates their fair values based on comparable borrowing rates available to the company. The Company evaluated the fair market value of LVCA using Level 3 inputs. From that measurement, the Company recorded an impairment of LVCA.

 

There have been no changes in Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3 categorizations and no changes in valuation techniques for these assets or liabilities for the year ended December 31, 2019. No derivatives pre acquisition.

 

    Level 1     Level 2     Level 3     Total  
Derivative Liabilities 2020   $ -     $ -     $ 118,641     $ 118,641  
Derivative Liabilities 2019   $ -     $ -     $ 1,433,597     $ 1,433,597  

 

Income Taxes – Income tax assets and liabilities are recorded using the asset and liability method. Under the asset and liability method, tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the tax consequences attributable to differences between financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases as well as net operating loss and tax credit carryovers. Future tax assets and liabilities are measured using the enacted tax rates expected to apply when the asset is realized, or the liability settled. The effect on future tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that enactment occurs. To the extent that we do not consider it more likely than not that a future tax asset will be recovered, we will provide a valuation allowance against the excess.

 

We follow the provisions of ASC 740, Income Taxes. Because of ASC 740, we make a comprehensive review of our portfolio of tax positions in accordance with recognition standards established by ASC 740.

 

When tax returns are filed, it is highly certain that some positions taken would be sustained upon examination by the taxing authorities, while others are subject to uncertainty about the merits of the position taken or the amount of the position that would be ultimately sustained. The benefit of a tax position is recognized in our consolidated financial statements in the period during which, based on all available evidence, we believe it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained upon examination, including the resolution of appeals or litigation processes, if any. Tax positions taken are not offset or aggregated with other positions. Tax positions that meet the more-likely-than-not recognition threshold are measured as the largest amount of tax benefit that is more than 50 percent likely of being realized upon settlement with the applicable taxing authority. The portion of the benefits associated with tax positions taken that exceeds the amount measured as described above is reflected as a liability for unrecognized tax benefits in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets along with any associated interest and penalties that would be payable to the taxing authorities upon examination.

 

31
 

 

We have created our tax provision leveraging known tax court cases involving various marijuana dispensaries and other cannabis related businesses, including the section of the IRS Tax code of 280E. The U.S. Tax Code Section 280E is the federal statute that states that a business engaging in the trafficking of a Schedule I or II controlled substance, which includes cannabis and cannabis related products, are barred from taking the tax deductions or credits in their federal tax returns which are not considered as part of the business’ cost of goods sold. Given the guidance offered by the Tax code 280E we have prepared our tax provision according to this tax code.

 

Interest and penalties associated with unrecognized tax benefits, if any, are classified as interest expense and penalties and are included in selling, general and administrative expenses in our consolidated statements of operations.

 

On December 22, 2017, the U.S. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act was enacted. U.S. tax reform introduced many changes, including lowering the U.S. corporate tax rate to 21 percent, changes in incentives, provisions to prevent U.S. base erosion and significant changes in the taxation of international income, including provisions which allow for the repatriation of foreign earnings without U.S. tax. The enactment of U.S. tax reform had no significant impact on our income taxes for the year ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

Research and Development Expenses – Research and development (“R&D”) costs are charged to expense as incurred. Our R&D expenses include, but are not limited to, consulting service fees and materials and supplies used in the development of our proprietary products and services.

 

General and Administrative Expenses – General and administrative expenses consist primarily of personnel-related costs, fees for professional and consulting services, travel costs, rent, bad debt expense, general corporate costs, and other costs of administration such as human resources, finance and administrative roles.

 

Commitments and Contingencies – Certain conditions may exist as of the date our financial statements are issued, which may result in a loss, but which will only be resolved when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. We assess such contingent liabilities, and such assessment inherently involves an exercise of judgment. In assessing loss contingencies related to legal proceedings that are pending against us or unasserted claims that may result in such proceedings, we evaluate the perceived merits of the legal proceedings or unasserted claims as well as the perceived merits of the amount of relief sought or expected to be sought.

 

If the assessment of a contingency indicates that it is probable that a material loss has been incurred and the amount of the liability can be estimated, the estimated liability would be accrued in our consolidated financial statements. If the assessment indicates that a potentially material loss contingency is not probable, but is reasonably possible, or is probable but cannot be estimated, then the nature of the contingent liability, together with an estimate of the range of possible loss if determinable and material, would be disclosed.

 

Loss contingencies considered remote are generally not disclosed unless they involve guarantees, in which case the nature of the guarantee would be disclosed.

 

Net Loss Per Share – We compute net loss per share in accordance with ASC 260, Earnings per Share. Under the provisions of ASC 260, basic net loss per share includes no dilution and is computed by dividing the net loss available to common stockholders for the period by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Diluted net loss per share takes into consideration shares of common stock outstanding (computed under basic net loss per share) and potentially dilutive securities that are not anti-dilutive.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents – The Company considers all highly liquid investment securities with remaining maturities at the date of purchase of three months or less to be cash equivalents. Cash equivalents may be invested in money market funds, certificates of deposit or other interest-bearing accounts.

 

Concentration of Credit Risk – Financial instruments that potentially subject us to credit risk consist of cash. We maintain our cash with high credit quality financial institutions; at times, such balances with any one financial institution may not be insured by the FDIC.

 

32
 

 

Accounts Receivable and Revenue – The accounts receivable balance was $39,480 as of December 31, 2020 and $0 as of December 31, 2019. In 2020, 99% of accounts receivable consisted of one customer. In 2020, 63% of the net revenues generated with two customers. In 2019, 70% of net revenues generated were the result of transactions with one customer.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements – From time to time, the FASB or other standards setting bodies issue new accounting pronouncements. Updates to the FASB ASCs are communicated through issuance of an Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”). Unless otherwise discussed, we believe that the impact of recently issued guidance, whether adopted or to be adopted in the future, is not expected to have a material impact on our condensed consolidated financial statements upon adoption.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Adopted

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, “Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework—Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement” (“ASU 2018-13”). ASU 2018-13 removes, modifies and adds certain disclosure requirements in Topic 820 “Fair Value Measurement”. ASU 2018-13 eliminates certain disclosures related to transfers and the valuations process, modifies disclosures for investments that are valued based on net asset value, clarifies the measurement uncertainty disclosure, and requires additional disclosures for Level 3 fair value measurements. ASU 2018-13 is effective for the Company for annual and interim reporting periods beginning July 1, 2020. The Company is currently evaluating the impact ASU 2018-13 will have on its financial statements.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements Adopted

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), which supersedes existing guidance on accounting for leases in “Leases (Topic 840)” and generally requires all leases to be recognized in the consolidated balance sheet. ASU 2016-02 is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018; early adoption is permitted. The provisions of ASU 2016-02 are to be applied using a modified retrospective approach.

 

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-09, Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting. This ASU affects entities that issue share-based payment awards to their employees. The ASU is designed to simplify several aspects of accounting for share-based payment award transactions which include – the income tax consequences, classification of awards as either equity or liabilities, classification on the statement of cash flows and forfeiture rate calculations. ASU 2016-09 became effective for the Company in the first quarter of 2018.

 

In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-14, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) — Deferral of the Effective Date (ASU 2015-14), which defers the effective date of ASU 2014-09 for one year and permits early adoption as early as the original effective date of ASU 2014-09. The new revenue standard may be applied retrospectively to each prior period presented or retrospectively with the cumulative effect recognized as of the date of adoption. In 2016, the FASB issued additional guidance to clarify the implementation guidance (ASU 2016-08, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Principal versus Agent Considerations; ASU 2016-10, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Identifying Performance Obligations and Licensing; and ASU 2016-12, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Narrow-Scope Improvements and Practical Expedients). ASU 2015-14 became effective for the Company in the first quarter of 2018 and had no impact on the financial statements.

 

3. INCOME TAXES

 

The Company has generated losses before income tax of approximately $4,057,000 and $4,609,000 as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The company recognized a deferred tax asset of approximately $257,100 and $442,500 for the related NOL carry forward as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The Company operates in the cannabis industry, which incurs regulatory taxes in addition to comparable taxes of other industries.

 

On December 22, 2017, the legislation commonly referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act was enacted, which contains significant changes to U.S. tax law and was leveraged in our tax provision process.

 

33
 

 

The Company’s effective income tax differs from the statutory federal income tax as follows:

 

    2020     2019  
Net loss   $ 4,057,000     $ 4,609,000  
                 
Expected federal tax expense     (852,000 )     (967,900 )
Increase (decrease) in income tax resulting from:                
Permanent differences     910,000       852,400  
State and local income taxes, net of Federal benefit     (283,300 )     (321,900 )
Change in valuation allowance     224,400       437,400  
Current year tax provision   $ -     $ -  

 

In 2020, the net operating loss led to a deferred tax asset of approximately $257,100 and a deferred tax liability of $32,700 related to property and equipment. In 2019, the net operating loss led to a deferred tax asset of approximately $442,500 and includes a deferred tax asset of $58,000 related to the impairment loss of LVCA and a deferred tax liability of $59,800 related to property and equipment. On December 31, 2020 and 2019, based on the guidance in ASC 740-10-45-10A, we provided an allowance of $224,400 and $437,400, respectively, related to these tax benefits given the uncertainty of utilizing the asset.

 

4. NOTES PAYABLE

 

In October 2017, in connection with our purchase of two acres of fully entitled cannabis real property located in the Coachillin’ Industrial Cultivation and Ancillary Canna-Business Park, the Company issued a first and second trust deed note in the amounts of $700,000 and $200,000, respectively. The first and second trust deed notes are long-term notes and are interest only notes, at 13.0%, and mature in August 2022, with the principal payment due at maturity. For the $700,000 loan, the monthly payment is approximately $7,500. For the $200,000 loan, the monthly payment is approximately $2,200. The 1st and 2nd trust deeds are secured by the land as well as property owned by two officers of the company and three other related parties. Also, each party has personally guaranteed or pledged additional collateral. The notes include a debt discount as of December 31, 2020 of $22,500.

 

In April 2018, the Company issued a note due 60 days after funding with a principal amount of $250,000 and interest totalling $125,000. As of September 30, 2019, the note has not been repaid and was amended to add an interest rate of 10% of the total balance due, which is included in our current liabilities. The note is past due. Two officers of the Company have personally guaranteed the loan.

 

In September 2019, the Company issued another note of $102,569 to an unrelated party with 5% interest, which was repaid in full on October 20, 2020.

 

 

5. NOTES PAYABLE, RELATED PARTY PAYABLES, AND OPERATING LEASE – RELATED PARTY

 

Notes payable to officers and directors as of December 31, 2020 and related party payables to officers and directors as of December 31, 2019 are due on demand and consisted of the following:

 

   

Related Party

Notes Payable

December 31, 2020

   

Related Party
Payables

December 31, 2019

 
Payable to an officer and director   $ 82,056     $ 115,249  
Payable to an individual affiliate of an officer and director     40,000       40,000  
Payable to a company affiliate to an officer and director     366,377       126,377  
    $ 488,433     $ 281,626  

 

Related party notes payable bear interest at 10%.

 

34
 

 

A related party leased two eco-pods in April 2019 and May 2019, which are refurbished shipping containers, located on this specific parcel within Coachillin’. The lease is treated as an operating lease and payment responsibility is ultimately the responsibility of the related party. The Company assumed these lease payment obligations in May 2019. The monthly payments are $1,055 and $880, for the duration of the lease terms of four and five years, respectively.

 

Included in related party payable as of December 31, 2020, there is $240,000 of related party expenses. The expenses bear a 10% annual interest rate consistent with the other related party notes. As of February 2021, the Board of Directors has decided to retire all related party debt through the issuance of stock.

 

6. LEGAL SETTLEMENTS

 

As of December 31, 2020, legal settlements consist of a $73,966 balance and $673,021 balance bearing interest at 10% and 6%, respectively. (Note 12 Commitments and contingencies).

 

7. CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE

 

In August 2020, 9,100,380 shares were issued to settle $80,754 debt of a note and accrued interest resulting in a loss of $5,225. During 2019, debt and accrued interest in the amount of $429,843 were converted to 9,947,843 shares of common stock. As a result of these conversions, the Company recognized approximately $77 as a gain on extinguishment of debt.

 

Amortization of note discounts, which is included in interest expense, amounted to $1,425,224 during the year ended December 31, 2020 and $278,209 for the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

Grapefruit acquired convertible notes in its acquisition of Imaging3, Inc. on July 10, 2019. (See Note 15.) On May 31, 2019, the Company executed the SPA with Auctus pursuant to the terms of which the Company agreed to sell $4,000,000 of the Notes and issue $6,200,000 of callable warrants (the “Warrants” and, together with the Notes, the “Securities”) to Auctus. Auctus is the Selling Security Holder. In addition, on May 31, 2019, we also entered into a registration rights agreement with Auctus (the “Registration Rights Agreement”) whereby we are obligated to file a registration statement to register the resale of the shares underlying the Securities. On July 25, 2019 (as amended on January 17, 2020), a registration statement was filed to comply with the Registration Rights Agreement . Pursuant to the SPA, Auctus became obligated to purchase the $4,000,000 of Notes from Grapefruit in four tranches as follows: $600,000 at the SPA closing, which was funded on June 6, 2019; the second tranche of $1,422,750 on the day IGNG filed the registration statement, which was funded on August 16, 2019; the third tranche of $1,030,000 was funded the day the SEC declares the registration statement effective and the fourth tranche of $1 million was funded 90 days after effectiveness. As of December 31, 2020, all tranches of this financing were completed. The Company has received gross proceeds of $4,052,750. The Notes have a two-year term and will bear interest at 10%.

 

On April 15, 2021, the company renegotiated the debt agreement related to these notes modifying the convertible notes conversion price from a variable rate to a fixed rate conversion price with an effective date of December 31, 2020. As a result of the agreement, the Company recorded a noncash expense for the change in the value of derivative instruments of $40,372,883, which was simultaneously offset by a noncash gain of $39,640,477 from the extinguishment of debt, resulting a net loss of $753,699 from the renegotiation of the debt.

 

On February 26, 2021, the company issued a convertible note for $450,000 (Note 14 Subsequent Events).

 

In addition, the Company has eleven other convertible notes comprising $296,000 outstanding and they are currently in default. The interest on these notes varies from 5-10%. As of March 12, 2021, we are in the process of converting eight of the notes amounting to $241,000.

 

35
 

 

8. GOING CONCERN

 

Our consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis which assumes we will be able to realize our assets and discharge our liabilities in the normal course of business for the foreseeable future. During the year ended December 31, 2020, we incurred a net loss of $4,056,955, had a working capital deficit of $3,430,719 and had an accumulated deficit of $11,494,349 at December 31, 2020. Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon our ability to generate profitable operations in the future and, or, obtaining the necessary financing to meet our obligations and repay our liabilities arising from normal business operations as they come due. There is no assurance that these events will be satisfactorily completed. As a result, there is doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern for one year from the issuance date of these financial statements.

  

Management’s plan regarding this matter is to, amongst other things, seek additional equity financing by selling our equity securities and obtaining funds through the issuance of debt. We cannot be certain that funds from these sources will be available when needed or, if available, will be on terms favorable to us or to our stockholders. If we raise additional funds or settle liabilities by issuing equity securities, the percentage ownership of our stockholders may be reduced, stockholders may experience additional dilution, or such equity securities may provide for rights, preferences and/or privileges senior to those of the holders of our common stock. Our ability to execute our business plan and continue as a going concern may be adversely affected if we are unable to raise additional capital or operate profitably.

 

On July 10, 2019, Grapefruit USA, Inc. and Imaging3, Inc. (“IGNG”) closed a Share Exchange after the completion of all conditions subsequent contemplated by the Share Exchange Agreement among the parties thereto (the “SEA”), by which IGNG was acquired in a reverse acquisition (the “Acquisition”) by the former shareholders of Grapefruit Boulevard Investments, Inc (“Grapefruit). Under the terms of the SEA executed on May 31, 2019 IGNG became obligated to issue to Grapefruit’s existing shareholders that number of newly issued restricted IGNG common shares such that the former Grapefruit shareholders (now new IGNG shareholders) own approximately 81% of the post-Acquisition IGNG common shares and the current IGNG shareholders retain approximately 19% of the post-Acquisition IGNG common shares.

 

In connection with and dependent upon the successful consummation of the above transaction, on May 31, 2019, the Company executed the SPA with Auctus pursuant to the terms of which the Company agreed to sell $4,000,000 of the Notes and issue $6,200,000 of callable warrants (the “Warrants” and, together with the Notes, the “Securities”) to Auctus. Auctus is the Selling Security Holder. In addition, on May 31, 2019, we also entered into a registration rights agreement with Auctus (the “Registration Rights Agreement”) whereby we are obligated to file a registration statement to register the resale of the shares underlying the Securities. On July 25, 2019 (as amended on January 17, 2020), a registration statement was filed to comply with the Registration Rights Agreement . Pursuant to the SPA, Auctus became obligated to purchase the $4,000,000 of Notes from Grapefruit in four tranches as follows: $600,000 at the SPA closing, which was funded on June 6, 2019; the second tranche of $1,422,750 on the day IGNG filed the registration statement, which was funded on August 16, 2019; the third tranche of $1,030,000 was funded the day the SEC declares the registration statement effective and the fourth tranche of $1 million was funded 90 days after effectiveness. As of December 31, 2020, all tranches of this financing were completed. The Company has received gross proceeds of $4,052,750.

 

In the first quarter of 2021, Auctus exercised 2,000,000 warrants at $.125 in relation to the “SPA.” In addition, the company issued a $450,000 convertible to Auctus bearing 12% interest and 2-year maturity date. Principal payments shall be made in six (6) installments each in the amount of $75,000 commencing one hundred and eighty (180) days following the Issue Date and continuing thereafter each thirty (30) days for six (6) months. Notwithstanding the forgoing, the final payment of Principal and Interest shall be due on the Maturity Date. The conversion price is the lower of (i) the lowest trading price prior to the date of the note or (ii) the volume weighted average price for the 5 days prior to conversion. (Item 14. Subsequent Events)

 

9. STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

Preferred Stock

 

The Company has authorized 1,000,000 shares of $0.0001 par value preferred stock. As of December 31, 2020, and 2019, there are no shares of preferred stock outstanding.

 

Common Stock

 

The Company is authorized to issue 1,000,000,000 shares of $0.0001 par value common stock.

 

36
 

 

During the year ended December 31, 2020 a total of 1,150,000 shares were issued for services rendered valued at $288,032; 915,795 shares were issued upon receiving a loan valued at $44,874; 9,100,380 shares were issued to settle $80,754 debt of a note and accrued interest resulting in a loss of $5,225; and 7,213,933 shares were issued related to for a settlement valued at $566,294. In 2021, 1,000,000 shares were issued for a licensing agreement valued at $38,700 put into effect in 2020.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019 the Company issued a total of 470,000 shares of common stock for cash in the amount of $235,000; 4,500,000 shares were issued for services rendered valued at $382,500 of which $127,500 has been expensed; and 9,947,842 shares were issued related to conversion of notes payable. As a result of the acquisition, 460,702,487 shares were issued to Grapefruit shareholders and other parties involved with the acquisition.

 

As of December 31, 2020, there were approximately 614 record holders of our common stock, not including shares held in “street name” in brokerage accounts which is unknown. As of December 31, 2019, there were 504,700,437 shares of our common stock outstanding on record.

 

Stock Compensation for Non-employee

 

In August 2019, the Company issued 4,500,000 shares of common stock to a cannabis specialist to sit on an advisory board. The value of the shares totaled $382,500 and is to be expensed over a twelve-month period. As of December 31, 2020, the full amount has been expense.

 

Stock Option Plan

 

During 2014, the Board of Directors adopted, and the shareholders approved, the 2014 Stock Option Plan under which a total of 1,811,401 shares of common stock had been reserved for issuance. The 2014 Stock Option Plan will terminate in September 2024.

 

Stock Options

 

As of December 31, 2020, employees of the Company hold options to purchase 250,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $1.00.

 

Transactions in FY 2020   Quantity     Weighted-Average
Exercise Price
Per Share
    Weighted-Average
Remaining
Contractual Life
 
Outstanding, December 31, 2019     250,000     $ 1.00       5.57  
Granted                        
Exercised     -                  
Cancelled/Forfeited     -                  
Outstanding, December 31, 2020     250,000     $ 1.00       4.57  
Exercisable, December 31, 2020     250,000     $ 1.00       4.57  

 

The weighted average remaining contractual life of options outstanding issued under the Plan was 4.57 years at December 31, 2020.

 

37
 

 

10. WARRANTS

 

Following is a summary of warrants outstanding at December 31, 2020:

 

 

Number of

Warrants

   

Exercise

Price

    Expiration Date
37,500     $ 0.10     April 2022
500,00     $ 0.10     August 2022
575,000     $ 0.10     April 2023
125,000     $ 0.10     May 2023
162,500     $ 0.10     August 2023
2,800,000     $ 0.40     May 2022
302,776     $ 0.10     January 2024
12,000,000     $ 0.10     March 2021
2,160,000     $ 0.10     June 2021
16,000,000     $ 0.125     May 2021
15,000,000     $ 0.15     May 2021
8,000,000     $ 0.25     May 2021

 

Grapefruit acquired warrants to issue common stock upon exercise in its acquisition of Imaging3, Inc. on July 10, 2019. As part of the SPA, the Company also issued 16,000,000 warrants to purchase 16,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.125 per share, 15,000,000 warrants to purchase 15,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.15 per share, 8,000,000 warrants to purchase 8,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.25 (collectively, the “Warrants”) per share for a period of two year from the date of issuance. The Warrants are “cash only” and are callable if Grapefruit stock trades on the OTCQB at 200% or more of a given exercise price for 5 consecutive days.

 

In the first quarter of 2021, Auctus exercised 2,000,000 warrants at $.125 in relation to the SPA. On April 15, 2021, the Company restructured a large majority of their convertible notes, and as part of the agreement an additional 20,000,000 warrants were issued with an exercise price of $0.075 per share. In relation to these 20,000,000 warrants, the holder may elect to receive warrant shares pursuant to a cashless exercise, in lieu of a cash exercise, equal to the value of this warrant.

 

11. DERIVATIVE LIABILITIES

 

Grapefruit acquired derivative instruments in its acquisition of Imaging3, Inc. on July 10, 2019. (See Note 15.) The Company’s only asset or liability measured at fair value on a recurring basis was its derivative liability associated with related warrants to purchase common stock and the conversion features embedded in convertible promissory notes.

 

In connection with financing transactions, the Company issued warrants to purchase common stock and convertible promissory notes. These instruments included provisions that could result in a reduced exercise price based on specified full-ratchet anti-dilution provisions. The “reset” provisions were triggered in the event the Company subsequently issued common stock, stock warrants, stock options or convertible debt with a stock price, exercise price or conversion price lower than contractually specified amounts. Upon triggering the “reset” provisions, the exercise / conversion price of the instrument will be reduced. Accordingly, pursuant to ASC 815, these instruments were not considered to be solely indexed to the Company’s own stock and were not afforded equity treatment.

 

As of April 15, 2020, the company has, for the past six weeks, been in the process of renegotiating certain key terms of its approximately $4,500,000 of convertible notes (the “Notes”) issued to its sole institutional investor in 2019, 2020 and 2021. A key element of these negotiations has been modifying the note conversion price from a variable rate to a fixed rate conversion price. It has required more time than expected for the parties to reach agreement on this issue than originally anticipated, but after several weeks of talks, the parties reached agreement today, April 15, 2021 on a fixed conversion price (See “Note 7. Convertible Notes Payable” for terms). These highly favorable terms has also eliminated several derivatives, and the company does not to anticipate seeing large cashless gains or losses from the changes in fair value of the derivatives.

 

The following table summarizes activity in the Company’s derivative liability during the year ended December 31, 2020:

 

12-31-19 Balance   $ 1,433,597  
Creation     1,434,345  
Reclassification of equity     (1,652,615 )
Settlement of debt     (41,490,862 )
Change in Value     40,394,176  
12-31-2020 Balance   $ 118,641  

 

The Company classifies the fair value of these derivative liabilities under level 3 of the fair value hierarchy of financial instruments. The fair value of the derivative liability was calculated using a Black Scholes model. The Company’s stock price and estimates of volatility are the most sensitive inputs in validation of assets and liabilities at fair value. The liabilities were measured using the following assumptions:

 

Term   0.01 years -5.0 years  
Dividend Yield     0 %
Risk-free rate     2.33% - 2.49 %
Volatility     65-220 %

 

38
 

 

12. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

Alpha Capital Anstalt and Brio Capital Master Fund, LTD

 

On September 13, 2017, Alpha Capital Anstalt and Brio Capital Master Fund, LTD, two minority members of a group of investors in the Company (the “Plaintiff”) filed a lawsuit seeking damages and injunctive relief in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York claiming that the Company breached certain Note and Warrant agreements among the parties to the action. The holders of the majority of the investment involved in the above lawsuit chose not to join in the lawsuit and have informed the Company that they believe the lawsuit to be baseless. On November 21, 2017, the Court denied the Plaintiff’s request for injunctive relief against the Company. As a result, the case essentially became an action for money damages against the Company, which the Company believed to be without merit and defended vigorously. However, on July 27, 2018 United States District Court for the Southern District of New York granted the plaintiffs motion for summary judgement, awarding them approximately $1.4 million dollars. On April 15, 2019 the Company executed a settlement agreement (the “Settlement Agreement”) with the defendants to settle the matter by agreeing to pay the defendants an aggregate of $200,000 and issuing them an aggregate of 7,705,698 of the Company’s common shares (subject to certain possible adjustments to the amount of shares to be issued to the Defendants by the Company). The Company paid this $200,000 to the defendants and issued the 7,705,698 shares to the defendants in the fourth quarter of 2019. Subsequently, the defendant’s claimed the aforementioned share adjustment had been triggered and made a demand that the Company issue additional shares pursuant to the terms of the Settlement. In March 2021, the Company agreed to issue an additional aggregate of 2,822,654 shares the Company’s stock to these defendants in final settlement of the dispute.

 

Administrative Claim of Greenberg Glusker Fields Claman & Machtinger LLP

 

The Company came to a settlement agreement with Greenberg Glusker Fields Claman & Machtinger LLP (“Greenberg”). The full debt of $1,117,547 bearing on interest of 6% is to be repaid. Three $68,000 payments are to be made in relation to the timing of the three tranches mentioned in “Auctus Financing” or before November 30, 2019. As of now, $68,000 has been paid. In addition, 7,628,567 shares are to be issued as part of the settlement agreement—7,213,933 of the shares were issued as of December 31, 2020. The settlement includes a make-whole provision in which additional shares are to be issued if the above mentions shares do not repay the debt in full.

 

Galileo Surgery Center LP/Cypress Ambulatory Surgery Center LP vs Imaging3, Inc. Settlement

 

The Company came to a settlement with Galileo Surgery Center LP/Cypress Ambulatory Surgery Center LP (“Galileo”) for $75,572 with an interest rate of 10%, requiring payments of $2,000 per month beginning in August 2019 until paid in full. The company is currently behind on payments.

 

13. INVESTMENTS

 

Acquisition of Lake Victoria Mining Company

 

In December 2018, we purchased a public shell company, Lake Victoria Mining Company. (“LVCA”), for $150,000 cash and $30,300, which included a noncontrolling interest of $15,085 for a total investment amount of $195,385, through which we originally intended to effectuate becoming a public company through a reverse merger transaction. We accounted for the purchase as an asset acquisition whereby the total investment amount was recorded as an intangible asset. In early 2019 however, we determined that LVCA was not a suitable entity through which we could accomplish our objective. Accordingly, we recorded a permanent impairment charge related to the intangible asset in the amount of $195,385, leaving a net realizable value of $0 as of December 31, 2019.

 

In July 2019, we sold our investment in LVCA to an entity owned by the CEO and COO of the Company for $1,000 and the assumption of $24,553 of liabilities resulting in a net gain of $25,553.

 

Investment in Hemp

 

In September 2019, the Company invested in hemp product that was purchased and stored by a third party.

 

39
 

 

14. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

On February 18, 2021, Auctus exercised 2,000,000 warrants at $.125 in relation to the “SPA.”

 

On February 26, 2021, the Company issued a $450,000 convertible to Auctus bearing 12% interest and 2-year maturity date. Principal payments shall be made in six (6) installments each in the amount of $75,000 commencing one hundred and eighty (180) days following the Issue Date and continuing thereafter each thirty (30) days for six (6) months. Notwithstanding the forgoing, the final payment of Principal and Interest shall be due on the Maturity Date. The conversion price is the lower of (i) the lowest trading price prior to the date of the note or (ii) the volume weighted average price for the 5 days prior to conversion.

 

On March 16, 2021, the Company agreed to issue 3,920,865 shares to Greenberg Glusker Fields Claman & Machtinger LLP as part of the make-whole provision as part of their settlement, which is expected to be issued in the second quarter of 2021. (See Note 12. Commitments and Contingencies).

 

On April 15, 2021, the company renegotiated conversion terms on $4,502,750 of convertible notes with Auctus; $4,052,750 from the “SPA” and $450,000 from the February 26, 2021 note. All variable conversion prices were replaced with a fixed conversion price of $0.075. In additions, 20,000,000 we warrants were issued with an exercise price of $0.075 per share. In relation to these 20,000,000 warrants, the holder may elect to receive warrant shares pursuant to a cashless exercise, in lieu of a cash exercise, equal to the value of this warrant.

 

On April 19, 2021, Alpha Capital Anstalt and Brio Capital Master Fund, LTD was issued 2,822,654 shares as part of their true-up provision in their settlement. (See Note 12. Commitments and Contingencies).

 

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE.

 

ITEM 9A. CONTROL AND PROCEDURES

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)). Based upon that evaluation, our principal executive officer and principal financial officer concluded that, as of the end of the period covered in this report, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed in reports filed under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the required time periods and is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure, due to the material weaknesses identified below.

 

Our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, does not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures or our internal controls will prevent all error or fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Due to the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, have been detected. To address the material weaknesses, we performed additional analysis and other post-closing procedures in an effort to ensure our consolidated financial statements included in this annual report have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Accordingly, management believes that the financial statements included in this report fairly present in all material respects our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented.

 

Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting as such term is defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act. Internal control over financial reporting is a process designed under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our principal executive and financial officer, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with GAAP.

 

As of December 31, 2020, our management assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting using the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission in Internal Control-Integrated Framework (2013 Framework). Based on this assessment, our management concluded that, as of December 31, 2020, our internal control over financial reporting was effective based on those criteria.

 

Independent Registered Accountant’s Internal Control Attestation

 

This annual report does not include an attestation report of our public accounting firm regarding our internal control over financial reporting.

 

40
 

 

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

There have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting through the date of this report or during the quarter ended December 31, 2020, that materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION

 

None.

 

PART III

 

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS, AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

The following table lists our executive officers and directors as of December 31, 2020:

 

Name   Age   Position
John Hollister   58   Chief Executive Officer (through June 3, 2019), Director (through February 26, 2021)
Bradley J Yourist   50   Chief Executive Officer and Director
Daniel J Yourist   52   Chief Operating Officer, Corporate Secretary, and Director
Kenneth J. Biehl   64   Executive Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

 

Bradley J Yourist - In July 2019, Mr. Yourist was appointed the Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Imaging3, Inc., a Delaware corporation (“IGNG”).

 

In August 2017, Mr. Bradley J. Yourist was appointed the Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Grapefruit Boulevard Investment, Inc.

 

From June 2007 to the present, Mr. Yourist has been a partner in Yourist Law Corporation which is based in Los Angeles, California.

 

Mr. Yourist possesses a combined twenty-five years of senior management experience from running his own law firm to Grapefruit’s Cannabis Distribution and Manufacturing Divisions. He has gained significant hands-on experience in the daily operations of Grapefruit’s licensed cannabis business and he fully understands the California wholesale cannabis market and its current market trends.

 

Moreover, Mr. Yourist was instrumental in launching Grapefruit’s edible division and has set-up strategic relationships to work with other California licensed companies to produce high quality cannabis infused edibles for the retail market. He and his team are also responsible for planning, licensing and permitting Grapefruit’s ‘Type 6’ ethanol cannabis extraction laboratory located in the City of Desert Hot Springs. Since 2007, Mr. Yourist advised Prop. 215 ‘compliant’ medical cannabis cultivation operations and learned first-hand of the potential medical benefits of cannabis use for both cancer and terminally ill patients.

 

In December 1995, Mr. Yourist became a member of the State Bar of California and has remained in good standing ever since. He also has several published appellate opinions to his credit. Mr. Yourist also holds a California Real Estate Broker’s License from 1995 to present date.

 

In June 1995, Mr. Yourist graduated law school with honors as a member of the law review at the University of La Verne School of Law and in 1992, he earned his BA in Political Science from California State University of Northridge.

 

Daniel J Yourist has been a Director and the Chief Operating Officer of Grapefruit Boulevard Investments, Inc. since the company was formed in August 2017. Mr. Yourist is a licensing expert in the cannabis space. He has extensive compliance and operational experience in all facets of managing a California Cannabis business – from sourcing, purchasing and selling compliant cannabis goods to retailers, manufacturers and distributors to ensuring compliance with all State and Local Cannabis Laws and Regulations. Mr. Yourist is seasoned, precise and brings clarity to the regulatory atmosphere at Grapefruit as well as his comprehensive working knowledge of the operational aspects of distribution and manufacturing. Mr. Yourist was admitted to the State Bar of California in December 1995. He has worked for Yourist Law Corporation as Partner/Shareholder continuously since 2003. He has extensive litigation experience in business and regulatory disputes, employment law/class action litigation, as well as appellate experience in both the State and Federal arenas. Mr. Yourist has held a California Real Estate Broker license since 2000.

 

41
 

 

Kenneth J. Biehl joined the company as Executive Vice President & Chief Financial Officer in March of 2018. He is a C-level, strategic, operations and finance executive with over 25 years of experience in leading private, public, and nonprofit companies through growth, mergers and acquisitions, and IPOs. Mr. Biehl is also the CEO of CxCTeams, a provider of finance and accounting services, which was founded in 2005. Mr. Biehl has served as an executive finance and operations officer of several public and private companies. From 2000 to 2005, he was the COO and CFO of Integrated Information Systems (IIS), a public IT consultancy corporation specializing in Microsoft and custom application development solutions in Tempe, Arizona. Prior to IIS, from 1997 to 2000, he served as EVP and CFO for Sunstone Hotel Investors, a public real estate investment trust, investing in and operating lodging assets, headquartered in San Clemente, California. Prior to Sunstone, Mr. Biehl served as Vice President & Corporate Controller of Starwood Lodging. Prior to Starwood, Mr. Biehl served with KPMG, PricewaterhouseCoopers, and Ernst & Young international accounting firms. He is a graduate from the Brigham Young Marriott School of Accountancy.

 

Limitation of Liability and Indemnification of Officers and Directors

 

Under the California Corporation Code, our directors will have no personal liability to us or our stockholders for monetary damages incurred as the result of the breach or alleged breach by a director of his “duty of care.” This provision does not apply to the directors’ (i) acts or omissions that involve intentional misconduct or a knowing and culpable violation of law, (ii) acts or omissions that a director believes to be contrary to the best interests of the corporation or its shareholders or that involve the absence of good faith on the part of the director, (iii) approval of any transaction from which a director derives an improper personal benefit, (iv) acts or omissions that show a reckless disregard for the director’s duty to the corporation or its shareholders in circumstances in which the director was aware, or should have been aware, in the ordinary course of performing a director’s duties, of a risk of serious injury to the corporation or its shareholders, (v) acts or omissions that constituted an unexcused pattern of inattention that amounts to an abdication of the director’s duty to the corporation or its shareholders, or (vi) approval of an unlawful dividend, distribution, stock repurchase or redemption. This provision would generally absolve directors of personal liability for negligence in the performance of duties, including gross negligence.

 

The California Corporations Code grants corporations the right to indemnify their directors, officers, employees and agents in accordance with applicable law. Our bylaws provide for indemnification of such persons to the full extent allowable under applicable law. These provisions will not alter the liability of the directors under federal securities laws.

 

We intend to enter into agreements to indemnify our directors and officers, in addition to the indemnification provided for in our bylaws. These agreements, among other things, indemnify our directors and officers for certain expenses (including attorneys’ fees), judgments, fines, and settlement amounts incurred by any such person in any action or proceeding, including any action by or in the right of Imaging3, arising out of such person’s services as a director or officer of Imgagin3, any subsidiary of Imaging3 or any other company or enterprise to which the person provides services at our request. We believe that these provisions and agreements are necessary to attract and retain qualified directors and officers.

 

Insofar as indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act may be permitted to directors, officers or persons controlling us pursuant to the foregoing provisions, we have been informed that in the opinion of the Securities and Exchange Commission, such indemnification is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and is therefore unenforceable.

 

Board Committees

 

Our board of directors does not have a compensation committee so all decisions with respect to management compensation are made by the whole board. Our board of directors does not have a nominating committee. Therefore, the selection of persons or election to the board of directors was neither independently made nor negotiated at arm’s length.

 

42
 

 

AUDIT COMMITTEE

 

Report of the Audit Committee

 

The members of our Audit Committee are Bradley J. Yourist, Chair and Daniel J. Yourist. Our audit committee has reviewed and discussed our audited financial statements for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019 with senior management. The audit committee has reviewed and discussed with management our audited financial statements. The audit committee has also discussed with L&L CPAs, PA (“L&L”), our independent auditors, the matters required to be discussed by the statement on Auditing Standards No. 16 (Communication with Audit Committees) and received the written disclosures and the letter from L&L required by Independence Standards Board Standard No. 1 (Independence Discussion with Audit Committees). The audit committee has discussed with L&L the independence of L&L as our auditors. Based on the foregoing, our audit committee has recommended to the board of directors that our audited financial statements be included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019 for filing with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. Our audit committee did not submit a formal report regarding its findings.

 

Notwithstanding anything to the contrary set forth in any of our previous or future filings under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, that might incorporate this report in future filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, in whole or in part, the foregoing report shall not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any such filing.

 

Code of Conduct

 

We have adopted a code of conduct that applies to all of its directors, officers and employees. The text of the code of conduct has been posted on our Internet website and can be viewed at www.imaging3.com. Any waiver of the provisions of the code of conduct for executive officers and directors may be made only by our audit committee or the full board of directors and, in the case of a waiver for members of the audit committee, by the board of directors. Any such waivers will be promptly disclosed to our shareholders.

 

Delinquent Section 16(a) Reports

 

Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act requires our officers and directors, and persons who own more than 10% of our common stock, to file reports of ownership and changes in ownership with the SEC. Our current officers and directors have not yet filed their Form 3s with the SEC.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

During the past ten years, none of our current directors or executive officers has been:

 

  the subject of any bankruptcy petition filed by or against any business of which such person was a general partner or executive officer either at the time of the bankruptcy or within two years prior to that time;
     
  convicted in a criminal proceeding or is subject to a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offenses);
     
  subject to any order, judgment or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction, permanently or temporarily enjoining, barring, suspending or otherwise limiting his involvement in any type of business, securities or banking activities;
     
  found by a court of competent jurisdiction (in a civil action), the SEC or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated a federal or state securities or commodities law, that has not been reversed, suspended, or vacated;

 

43
 

 

  subject of, or a party to, any order, judgment, decree or finding, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, relating to an alleged violation of a federal or state securities or commodities law or regulation, law or regulation respecting financial institutions or insurance companies, law or regulation prohibiting mail or wire fraud or fraud in connection with any business entity; or
     
  subject of, or a party to, any sanction or order, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any self-regulatory organization, any registered entity or any equivalent exchange, association, entity or organization that has disciplinary authority over its members or persons associated with a member.

 

None of our directors, officers or affiliates, or any beneficial owner of 5% or more of our common stock, or any associate of such persons, is an adverse party in any material proceeding to, or has a material interest adverse to, us or any of our subsidiaries.

 

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

Compensation Discussion and Analysis

 

The following Compensation Discussion and Analysis describes the material elements of compensation for our executive officers identified in the Summary Compensation Table (“Named Executive Officers”), and executive officers that we may hire in the future. As more fully described below, our board of directors makes all decisions for the total compensation of our executive officers, including the Named Executive Officers. We do not have a compensation committee, so all decisions with respect to management compensation are made by the whole board.

 

Compensation Program Objectives and Rewards

 

Our compensation philosophy is based on the premise of attracting, retaining, and motivating exceptional leaders, setting high goals, working toward the common objectives of meeting the expectations of customers and stockholders, and rewarding outstanding performance. Following this philosophy, in determining executive compensation, we consider all relevant factors, such as the competition for talent, our desire to link pay with performance in the future, the use of equity to align executive interests with those of our stockholders, individual contributions, teamwork and performance, and each executive’s total compensation package. We strive to accomplish these objectives by compensating all executives with total compensation packages consisting of a combination of competitive base salary and, once we grow more and increase our staff, incentive compensation. Because of our small size and staff to date, we have not yet adopted a management equity incentive plan, nor have we yet used equity incentives as part of our management compensation policy.

 

While we have not hired at the executive level significantly since inception because our business has not grown sufficiently to justify increasing staff, we expect to grow and hire in the future. Our Named Executive Officers have been with us for many years and their compensation has basically been static, based primarily on levels at which we can afford to retain them, and their responsibilities and individual contributions. To date, we have not applied a formal compensation program to determine the compensation of the Named Executives. In the future, as we and our management team expand, our board of directors expects to add independent members, form a compensation committee comprised of independent directors, adopt a management equity incentive plan and apply the compensation philosophy and policies described in this section of the Form 10-K.

 

The primary purpose of the compensation and benefits described below is to attract, retain and motivate highly talented individuals when we do hire, who will engage in the behaviors necessary to enable us to succeed in our mission while upholding our values in a highly competitive marketplace. Different elements are designed to engender different behaviors, and the actual incentive amounts which may be awarded to each Named Executive Officer are subject to the annual review of the board of directors. The following is a brief description of the key elements of our planned executive compensation structure.

 

Base salary and benefits are designed to attract and retain employees over time. Incentive compensation awards are designed to focus employees on the business objectives for a particular year. Equity incentive awards, such as stock options and non-vested stock, focus executives’ efforts on the behaviors within the recipients’ control that they believe are designed to ensure our long-term success as reflected in increases to our stock prices over a period of several years, growth in our profitability and other elements. Severance and change in control plans are designed to facilitate a company’s ability to attract and retain executives as it competes for talented employees in a marketplace where such protections are commonly offered.

 

44
 

 

The Elements of Grapefruit’s Compensation Program

 

Base Salary

 

Executive officer base salaries are based on job responsibilities and individual contribution. The board reviews the base salaries of our executive officers, including our Named Executive Officers, considering factors such as corporate progress toward achieving objectives (without reference to any specific performance-related targets) and individual performance experience and expertise. None of our Named Executive Officers have employment agreements with us. Additional factors reviewed by the board of directors in determining appropriate base salary levels and raise’s include subjective factors related to corporate and individual performance. For the year ended December 31, 2019, all executive officer base salary decisions were approved by the board of directors.

 

Incentive Compensation Awards

 

The Named Executives have not been paid bonuses and our board of directors has not yet established a formal compensation policy for the determination of bonuses. If our revenue grows and bonuses become affordable and justifiable, we expect to use the following parameters in justifying and quantifying bonuses for our Named Executive Officers and other officers of Imaging3: (1) the growth in our revenue, (2) the growth in our earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization, as adjusted (“EBITDA”), and (3) our stock price. The board has not adopted specific performance goals and target bonus amounts for any of its fiscal years but may do so in the future. It is anticipated that such an incentive compensation awards program may commence during the year 2019.

 

Equity Incentive Awards

 

As stated previously, in the future we plan to adopt a formal management equity incentive plan pursuant to which we plan to grant stock options and make restricted stock awards to members of management, which would not be assignable during the executive’s life, except for certain gifts to family members or trusts that benefit family members. These equity incentive awards, we believe, would motivate our employees to work to improve our business and stock price performance, thereby further linking the interests of our senior management and our stockholders. The board will consider several factors in determining whether awards are granted to an executive officer, including those previously described, as well as the executive’s position, his or her performance and responsibilities, and the amount of options or other awards, if any, currently held by the officer and their vesting schedule. Our policy will prohibit backdating options or granting them retroactively.

 

Benefits and Prerequisites

 

At this stage of our business we have limited benefits and no prerequisites for our employees other than health insurance and vacation benefits that are generally comparable to those offered by other small private and public companies or as may be required by applicable state employment laws. We do not have a 401(k) Plan or any other retirement plan for our Named Executive Officers. We may adopt these plans and confer other fringe benefits for our executive officers in the future if our business grows sufficiently to enable us to afford them.

 

Executive Compensation

 

The following table summarizes compensation paid or accrued by us for the years ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019 for services rendered in all capacities, by our chief executive officer and our two other most highly compensated executive officers who were paid total compensation of at least $100,000 during the fiscal years ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019.

 

45
 

 

Summary Compensation Table

 

Name and Principal
Position (1)
  Year     Salary     Bonus     Option Awards     Non-Equity Incentive Plan Compensation     Non-Qualified Deferred Compensation Earnings     All Other Compensation     Total  
                                                 
John Hollister,     2020     $ -       -     $ -       -       -       -     $ -  
CEO     2019 (1)   $ 128,125       -       -       -       -       -     $ 128,125  
Bradley J. Yourist,     2020     $ 180,000       -     $ -       -       -       -     $ 180,000  
CEO     2019     $ 90,000       -       -       -       -       -     $ 90,000  

 

(1) Mr. Hollister resigned as CEO on June 3, 2019. He remained a Director through February 26, 2021.

 

Employment Agreements

 

We entered into an employment agreement with our former chief executive officer, John Hollister, which commenced in November 2017. Mr. Hollister’s employment agreement provides for him to be paid an initial Salary of $17,500 per month rising to $26,500 per month if he achieves certain goals, and an annual bonus of up to $200,000 and certain Special Bonuses at the discretion of the Company’s board of directors. As of June 3, 2019, Mr. Hollister’s contract was terminated, and he has received no compensation since then.

 

The Company has not yet entered into employment agreements with Mr. Bradley Yourist or Mr. Dan Yourist but expects to do so in the future.

 

Employee Benefit Plans

 

We have not yet, but may in the future, establish a management stock option plan pursuant to which stock options may be authorized and granted to the executive officers, directors, employees and key consultants of Grapefruit.

 

Director Compensation

 

None.

 

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

The following table sets forth the names of our executive officers and directors and all persons known by us to beneficially own 5% or more of the issued and outstanding common stock of Grapefruit USA, Inc. at March 5, 2021. Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission. In computing the number of shares beneficially owned by a person and the percentage of ownership of that person, shares of common stock subject to options held by that person that are currently exercisable or become exercisable within 60 days of March 5, 2021 are deemed outstanding even if they have not actually been exercised. Those shares, however, are not deemed outstanding for the purpose of computing the percentage ownership of any other person. The percentage ownership of each beneficial owner is based on 510,567,041 outstanding shares of common stock. Except as otherwise listed below, the address of each person is c/o Grapefruit USA, Inc., 10866 Wilshire Blvd. Suite 225, Los Angeles, CA 90024. Except as indicated, each person listed below has sole voting and investment power with respect to the shares set forth opposite such person’s name.

 

Name, Title and Address     Number of
Shares
Beneficially
Owned
      Percentage Ownership  
             
Bradley Yourist, Chief Executive Officer and Director     129,983,568       25.46 %
Dan Yourist, Chief Operating Officer and Director     129,983,568       25.46 %
Luise & David Yourist (1)     32,495,892       6.37 %
John Hollister, Director     4,250,000       *  
Officers and Directors as a group (4 people)     296,713,028       57.29 %

 

* Less than 1%.
(1) Shares are held as joint tenants with right of survivorship

 

46
 

 

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

 

Notes payable to officers and directors as of December 31, 2020 and related party payables to officers and directors as of December 31, 2019 are due on demand and consisted of the following:

 

   

Related Party

Notes Payable

December 31, 2020

   

Related Party
Payables

December 31, 2019

 
Payable to an officer and director   $ 82,056     $ 115,249  
Payable to an individual affiliate of an officer and director     40,000       40,000  
Payable to a company affiliate to an officer and director     366,377       126,377  
    $ 488,433     $ 281,626  

 

Related party notes payable bear interest at 10%.

 

A related party leased two eco-pods in April 2019 and May 2019, which are refurbished shipping containers, located on this specific parcel within Coachillin’. The lease is treated as an operating lease and payment responsibility is ultimately the responsibility of the related party. The Company assumed these lease payment obligations in May 2019. The monthly payments are $1,055 and $880, for the duration of the lease terms of four and five years, respectively.

 

Included in related party payable as of December 31, 2020, there is $240,000 of related party expenses. The expenses bear a 10% annual interest rate consistent with the other related party notes. As of February 2021, the Board of Directors has decided to retire all related party debt through the issuance of stock.

 

 

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

 

Presently and since December 28, 2019, L&L CPAs, PA (“L&L”) has been and is our principal auditing firm. The audit committee approved the engagement of L&L before they rendered audit services to us. Prior to December 28, 2019, our principal auditing firm was SingerLewak Accounting and Consultants, who performed the audit for S-1/A filing.