UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, DC 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

[X]       Quarterly Report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2017

 

[ ]       Transition Report pursuant to 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

 

 

For the transition period from to _______

 

 

Commission File Number: 000-55609

 

Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada 90-0895673

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization) (IRS Employer Identification No.)

 

9101 LBJ Freeway, Suite 200, Dallas, TX 75243

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(800)-260-9062

(Registrant’s telephone number)

 

 

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

 

Indicated by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days [X] Yes [ ] No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.

 

[ ] Large accelerated filer [ ] Accelerated filer

 

[ ] Non-accelerated filer [X] Smaller reporting company

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). [ ] Yes [X] No

 

State the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date: 784,991,029 common shares as of May 14, 2017.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 229.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes [X] No [ ]

 

   
Table of Contents  

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART 1- FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

 

 

 

Page
Item 1: Consolidated Financial Statements 3
Item 2: Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 4
Item 3: Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 14
Item 4: Controls and Procedures 14

 

PART II – OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1: Legal Proceedings 16
Item 1A: Risk Factors 16
Item 2: Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds 17
Item 3: Defaults Upon Senior Securities 17
Item 4: Mine Safety Disclosures 17
Item 5: Other Information 17
Item 6: Exhibits 17

 

  2  
Table of Contents  

 

PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Consolidated Financial Statements

 

Our financial statements included in this Form 10-Q are as follows:

F-1 Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2017 and June 30, 2016 (unaudited);
F-2 Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 (unaudited); for the nine months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 (unaudited);
F-3 Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the nine months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 (unaudited);
F-4 Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (unaudited).

 

These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America for interim financial information and the SEC instructions to Form 10-Q. In the opinion of management, all adjustments considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included. Operating results for the interim period ended March 31, 2017 are not necessarily indicative of the results that can be expected for the full year.

 

  3  
Table of Contents  

 

Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc.

Consolidated Balance Sheets

(Unaudited)

 

    March 31, 2017   June 30, 2016
CURRENT ASSETS              
               
Cash   $ 458     $ 102,255
Accounts Receivable, net of allowance of $138,373 and $60,163     246,738       20,377
Inventory     266,078       290,368
Prepaid Expenses and Other Current Assets     1,919,104       1,716,551
TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS     2,432,378       2,129,551
               
Property and Equipment, net     55,155       92,208
Other Assets     76,799       33,230
               
TOTAL ASSETS   $ 2,564,332     $ 2,254,989
               
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' DEFICIT              
               
CURRENT LIABILITIES              
               
Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities   $ 932,966     $ 337,866
Related Party Convertible Notes Payable, net of debt discount     149,031       20,730
Related Party Notes Payable     110,000      
Convertible Notes Payable, net of debt discount     748,432       597,500
Note Payable-Other     29,052      
Accrued Interest     295,327       58,399
Deferred Revenue     —         500,000
Derivative Liability     5,136,765       2,217,744
TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES     7,401,573       3,732,239
               
SHAREHOLDERS' DEFICIT              
Preferred Stock - Series A - Par Value of $.001  1,000,000 shares authorized; 1,000,000 shares issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2017 and June 30, 2016     1,000       1,000
Preferred Stock - Series B - Par Value of $.001  9,000,000 shares authorized;  no shares issued and outstanding          
Preferred Stock - Series C - Par Value of $.001  2,000,000 shares authorized;  1,107,607 shares issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2017 and June 30, 2016     1,107       1,107
Preferred Stock - Series D - Par Value of $.001  2,000,000 shares authorized; no shares issued and outstanding          
Common Stock - Par Value of $.001  800,000,000 shares authorized; 784,691,029 shares issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2017; 537,989,764 shares issued and  outstanding as of June 30, 2016     784,691       537,990
Additional Paid In Capital     18,864,356       14,861,035
Accumulated Deficit     (24,488,395 )     (16,878,382)
TOTAL SHAREHOLDERS' DEFICIT     (4,837,241 )     (1,477,250)
               
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT   $ 2,564,332     $ 2,254,989

   

The Accompanying Notes are an Integral Part of the Consolidated Financial Statements

 

  F- 1  
Table of Contents  

 

Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Operations

(Unaudited)

 

    Three Months Ended   Nine Months Ended
    March 31, 2017     March 31, 2016   March 31, 2017     March 31, 2016
                             
Sales   $ 117,814     $ 157,138   $ 438,152     $ 746,825
                             
Cost of Sales     56,835       77,031     155,474       397,954
Inventory Obsolescence               28,837      
                             
Gross Profit     60,979       80,107     253,841       348,871
                             
Operating Expenses                            
General and Administrative     1,248,202       832,027     3,101,291       1,579,251
Advertising and Marketing     684,607       505,288     1,433,666       838,940
Total Operating Expenses     1,932,809       1,337,315     4,534,957       2,418,191
                             
Loss from Operations     (1,871,830)     (1,257,208)     (4,281,116)     (2,069,320)
                             
Other (Income)/Expenses:                            
Interest Expense     133,051       14,902     531,699       166,486
Debt Inducement Expense     —                  3,887,618
Loss on Extinguishment of Debt     —        945,838           945,838
(Gain) Loss on Change in Fair Value of Derivative Liability     2,464,439       (414,273)     2,797,198       (11,370,870)
Total Other (Income) Expenses:     2,597,490       546,467     3,328,897       (6,370,928)
                             
Income (Loss) Before Income Tax Provision     (4,469,320)     (1,803,675)     (7,610,013)     4,301,608
                             
Income Tax Provision                    
                             
Net Income (Loss)   $ (4,469,320)   $ (1,803,675)   $ (7,610,013)   $ 4,301,608
                             
Net Income (Loss) per Common Share - Basic and Diluted   $ (0.01)   $ (0.00)   $ (0.01)   $ 0.01
                             
Weighted Average Shares Outstanding     756,596,375       481,293,930     671,105,892       468,300,510
                                   

The Accompanying Notes are an Integral Part of the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

  F- 2  
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Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

(Unaudited)

 

    Nine Months Ended
    March 31, 2017   March 31, 2016
Operating Activities:              
Net Income (Loss)   $ (7,610,013 )   $ 4,301,608
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:              
  Stock-based compensation     1,015,687       496,866
  Stock-based payments to vendors     987,041       —  
  Warrants issued for services rendered     407,447       —  
  Non-cash interest expense     531,699       126,127
  (Gain) Loss on change in fair value of derivative liability     2,797,198       (11,370,870)
  Loss on disposal of property and equipment     26,671       —  
  Loss on extinguishment of debt     —         945,838
  Warrants issued for debt inducement     —         3,887,618
  Bad debt expense     93,220       —  
  Depreciation expense     25,948       8,199
Disposal of property and equipment     29,878       —  
  Inventory write-off     28,837       —  
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:     —         —  
  Accounts Receivable     (319,581 )     36,795
  Inventory     (4,547 )     122,676
  Prepaid expenses     (202,553 )     —  
  Other assets     (3,795 )     —  
  Accounts payable and accrued liabilities     595,100       491,413
  Deferred revenue     —         470,048
NET CASH USED IN OPERATING ACTIVITIES     (1,601,763 )     (483,682)
               
Investing Activites:              
  Investment in Rocky Mountain High Water Company     (39,774 )     —  
  Investment in product development     —         (19,400)
  Acquisition of property and equipment     (45,444 )     (45,118)
NET CASH USED IN INVESTING ACTIVITIES     (85,218 )     (64,518)
               
Financing Activities:              
  Proceeds from issuance of convertible notes     330,000       500,000
  Proceeds from issuance of related party notes     210,600       —  
  Repayment of convertible notes     —         (165,000)
  Repayment of related party convertible notes     —         34,319
  Proceeds from issuance of note payable-other     35,960       —  
  Repayment of note payable-other     (6,908 )     —  
  Proceeds from issuance of common stock     1,015,532       238,500
NET CASH PROVIDED BY FINANCING ACTIVITIES     1,585,184       607,819
               
INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH     (101,797 )     59,619
               
CASH - BEGINNING OF PERIOD     102,255       95,726
               
CASH - END OF PERIOD   $ 458     $ 155,345
               
Supplemental disclosure of non-cash financing and investing activities:              
  Common stock issued for conversion of debt   $ 189,455     $ 141,440
  Common stock issued for acquisition   $ —       $ 2,000
  Debt and accrued interest converted for common stock   $ 504,736     $ —  
  Common stock issued as part of legal settlement   $ 500,000     $ —  
  Derivative liability incurred for debt discount   $ —       $ 3,887,618
  Derivative liability relieved upon conversion of related debt   $ 352,625     $ 3,691,042
  Beneficial conversion feature recognized   $ 212,771     $ —  
  Series C preferred stock issued for conversion of debt   $ —       $ 1,107,606
  Debt and accrued interest converted for Series C preferred stock   $ —       $ 2,495,666

 

The Accompanying Notes are an Integral Part of the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

  F- 3  
Table of Contents  

 

Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

 

NOTE 1 – General

 

Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc. (“RMHB” or the “Company”) was incorporated under the laws of the State of Nevada. On July 17, 2014, the Company changed its name from Republic of Texas Brands Incorporated to Totally Hemp Crazy, Inc. and on October 23, 2015, the Company changed its name to Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc.

 

On June 30, 2016 the Company entered into a business alliance with Poafpybitty Family, LLC and formed Rocky Mountain High Water Company LLC (“RMHW”). The Company has a non-controlling interest in RMHW and accounts for its investment in RMHW on the equity method. In connection with this business alliance, the Company formed Eagle Spirit Land & Water Company (“ESLW”) effective June 30, 2016. ESLW is a wholly-owned consolidated subsidiary of the Company. On November 12, 2016, the agreement with the Poafpybitty Family was amended to give the Company a controlling voting interest of 75% of RMHW, while the Poafpybitty Family received 51% of the equity interest. Beginning November 12, 2016, the operations of RMHW are consolidated in the financial statements of RMHB.

 

RMHB has developed and is currently selling in the marketplace a lineup of five hemp-infused beverages, hemp-infused 2oz. energy shots, and plans to re-introduce hemp-infused relaxation brownies through its nationwide distributor network and online. Effective June 30, 2016, the Company entered into a business alliance with Poafpybitty Family, LLC to launch Eagle Spirit Spring Water, a line of purified, high-alkaline spring water sourced from Native American tribal land in Oklahoma.

 

NOTE 2 – Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America for interim financial statements and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Accordingly, they do not contain all information and footnotes required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America for annual financial statements. In the opinion of the Company’s management, the accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements contain all the adjustments necessary (consisting only of normal recurring accruals) to present the financial position of the Company as of March 31, 2017 and the results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented. The results of operations for the three and nine months ended March 31, 2017 are not necessarily indicative of the operating results for the full fiscal year or any future period. These unaudited consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and related notes thereto included in the Company’s form 10-K for the year ended June 30, 2016 filed with the SEC on October 4, 2016.

 

  F- 4  

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of the financial statements in conformity with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“GAAP”) requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the dates of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting periods. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Certain of the Company’s estimates could be affected by external conditions, including those unique to its industry, and general economic conditions. It is possible that these external factors could have an effect on the Company’s estimates that could cause actual results to differ from its estimates. The Company re-evaluates all of its accounting estimates at least quarterly based on these conditions and record adjustments when necessary.

 

Investments in non-consolidated subsidiaries

 

Investments in non-consolidated entities are accounted for using the equity method or cost basis depending upon the level of ownership and/or the Company's ability to exercise significant influence over the operating and financial policies of the investee. When the equity method is used, investments are recorded at original cost and adjusted periodically to recognize the Company's proportionate share of the investees' net income or losses after the date of investment. When net losses from an investment accounted for under the equity method exceed its carrying amount, the investment balance is reduced to zero and additional losses are not provided for. The Company resumes accounting for the investment under the equity method if the entity subsequently reports net income and the Company's share of that net income exceeds the share of net losses not recognized during the period the equity method was suspended. Investments are written down only when there is clear evidence that a decline in value that is other than temporary has occurred.

 

Cash

 

The Company considers all short-term highly liquid investments with an original maturity at the date of purchase of three months or less to be cash equivalents.

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company follows the guidance of the Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 605, “Revenue Recognition.” It records revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, product delivery has occurred, the selling price to the customer is fixed or determinable and collectability of the revenue is reasonably assured. The Company has not experienced any significant returns from customers and accordingly, in management’s opinion, no reserve for returns has been provided. Payments received prior to shipment of goods are recorded as deferred revenue.

 

Accounts Receivable and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts Receivable

 

The Company has a policy of reserving for uncollectible accounts based on the best estimate of the amount of probable credit losses in our existing accounts receivable. We extend credit to customers based on an evaluation of their financial condition and other factors. The Company generally does not require collateral or other security to support accounts receivable and perform ongoing credit evaluations of customers and maintain an allowance for potential bad debts if required.

 

  F- 5  

 

It is determined whether an allowance for doubtful accounts is required by evaluating specific accounts where information indicates the customers may have an inability to meet financial obligations. In these cases, we use assumptions and judgment, based on the best available facts and circumstances, to record a specific allowance for those customers against amounts due to reduce the receivable to the amount expected to be collected. These specific allowances are re-evaluated and adjusted as additional information is received. The amounts calculated are analyzed to determine the total amount of the allowance. The Company may also record a general allowance as necessary.

 

Direct write-offs are taken in the period when we have exhausted our efforts to collect overdue and unpaid receivables or otherwise evaluate other circumstances that indicate the collectability of receivables.

 

As of March 31, 2017 and June 30, 2016, the Company recorded an allowance for doubtful accounts of $138,373 and $60,163, respectively.

 

Inventory

 

Inventory, which consists of the Company’s raw materials, packaging, and finished products held for resale, are stated at the lower of cost, determined using the first-in, first-out, and net realizable value. Net realizable value is the estimated selling price, in the ordinary course of business, less estimated costs to dispose of the product.

 

If the Company identifies excess, obsolete or unsalable items, its inventory is written down to the net realizable value in the period in which the impairment is first identified. Shipping and handling costs incurred for inventory purchases and product shipments are recorded in cost of sales in the Company’s statements of operations.

 

Fair Value Measurements

 

The Company adopted the provisions of ASC Topic 820, “Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures,” which defines fair value as used in numerous accounting pronouncements, establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosure of fair value measurements.

 

The estimated fair value of certain financial instruments, including cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued expenses are carried at historical cost basis, which approximates their fair values because of the short-term nature of these instruments. The carrying amounts of our short and long term credit obligations approximate fair value because the effective yields on these obligations, which include contractual interest rates taken together with other features such as concurrent issuances of warrants and/or embedded conversion options, are comparable to rates of returns for instruments of similar credit risk.

 

ASC 820 defines fair value as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. ASC 820 also establishes a fair value hierarchy, which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. ASC 820 describes three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value:

 

•      Level 1 — quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

•      Level 2 — quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets or inputs that are observable.

•      Level 3 — inputs that are unobservable (for example cash flow modeling inputs based on assumptions).

 

The derivative liability in connection with the conversion feature of the convertible debt, classified as a Level 3 liability, is the only financial liability measure at fair value on a recurring basis.

 

The change in the Level 3 financial instrument is as follows:

 

Balance, June 30, 2016   $ 2,217,744
Issued during the nine months ended March 31, 2017   $ 445,007
Exercises/Conversions   $ (323,183)
Change in fair value recognized in operations   $ 2,797,197
Balance, March 31, 2017   $ 5,136,765

 

  F- 6  

The estimated fair value of the derivative instruments were valued using the Black-Scholes option pricing model, using the following assumptions as of March 31, 2017:

 

Estimate Dividends   None
Expected Volatility     3.0%
Risk Free Interest Rate     .76%
Expected Term     .1-.6 years

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment is stated at cost less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation is provided for on a straight-line basis over the useful lives of the assets. Expenditures for additions and improvements are capitalized; repairs and maintenance are expensed as incurred.

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

The Company evaluates intangible assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value of an asset may not be recoverable. The Company assesses the recoverability of the assets based on the undiscounted future cash flow and recognizes an impairment loss when the estimated undiscounted future cash flow expected to result from the use of the asset plus the net proceeds expected from disposition of the asset, if any, are less than the carrying value of the asset. When the Company identifies an impairment, it reduces the carrying amount of the asset to its estimated fair value based on a discounted cash flow approach or, when available and appropriate, to comparable market values. No impairment charges were recorded during the nine months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016.

 

Share-based Payments

 

Share-based payments to employees, including grants of employee stock options, are recognized as compensation expense in the financial statements based on their fair values, in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718. That expense is recognized over the period during which an employee is required to provide services in exchange for the award, known as the requisite service period (usually the vesting period). The Company had no common stock options or common stock equivalents granted or outstanding for all periods presented.

 

The Company issued restricted stock to consultants and employees for various services. Cost for these transactions are measured at the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instruments issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The value of the common stock is to be measured at the earlier of (i) the date at which a firm commitment for performance by the counterparty to earn the equity instruments is reached or (ii) the date at which the counterparty's performance is complete.

 

Convertible Instruments

 

The Company evaluates and accounts for conversion options embedded in convertible instruments in accordance with ASC 815 “Derivatives and Hedging Activities.” Applicable GAAP requires companies to bifurcate conversion options from their host instruments and account for them as freestanding derivative financial instruments according to certain criteria. The criteria include circumstances in which (a) the economic characteristics and risks of the embedded derivative instrument are not clearly and closely related to the economic characteristics and risks of the host contract, (b) the hybrid instrument that embodies both the embedded derivative instrument and the host contract is not re-measured at fair value under other GAAP with changes in fair value reported in earnings as they occur and (c) a separate instrument with the same terms as the embedded derivative instrument would be considered a derivative instrument.

 

  F- 7  

 

Preferred Stock

 

We apply the guidance enumerated in ASC 480 “Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity” when determining the classification and measurement of preferred stock. Preferred shares subject to mandatory redemption (if any) are classified as liability instruments and are measured at fair value. We classify conditionally redeemable preferred shares (if any), which includes preferred shares that feature redemption rights that are either within the control of the holder or subject to redemption upon the occurrence of uncertain events not solely within our control, as temporary equity. At all other times, we classified our preferred shares in stockholders’ equity. Our preferred shares do not feature any redemption rights within the holders’ control or conditional redemption features not within our control. Accordingly all issuances of preferred stock are presented as a component of consolidated shareholders’ deficit.

 

Advertising

 

Advertising and marketing expenses are charged to operations as incurred.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company uses the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes in accordance with ASC Topic 740, “Income Taxes.” Under this method, income tax expense is recognized for the amount of: (i) taxes payable or refundable for the current year and (ii) deferred tax consequences of temporary differences resulting from matters that have been recognized in an entity’s financial statements or tax returns. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in the results of operations in the period that includes the enactment date. A valuation allowance is provided to reduce the deferred tax assets reported if based on the weight of the available positive and negative evidence, it is more likely than not some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.

 

ASC Topic 740.10.30 clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an enterprise’s financial statements and prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for the financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. ASC Topic 740.10.40 provides guidance on derecognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure and transition. The Company has no material uncertain tax positions.

 

NOTE 3 – Going Concern

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company has a shareholders’ deficit of $4,837,241 and an accumulated deficit of $24,488,395 as of March 31, 2017, and has generated operating losses since inception. These factors, among others, raise substantial doubt about the ability of the Company to continue as a going concern. The Company’s continuation as a going concern is dependent upon its ability to generate revenues and its ability to continue raising capital.

 

On February 28, 2017, LSW Holdings, LLC (“LSW”) purchased all outstanding shares of Series A Preferred Stock from our former controlling shareholder. Accordingly, LSW is now our controlling shareholder. Our Vice President of International Sales is the Managing Member of LSW and, in that capacity, has the authority to direct voting and investment decisions with regard to its holdings in the company. The agreement between the parties requires that LSW provide the Company sufficient capital to move forward with its expansion plans.

 

  F- 8  

 

NOTE 4 – Inventory

 

As of March 31, 2017 and June 30, 2016, inventory consisted of the following:

 

    March 31, 2017  

June 30, 2016

Finished inventory   $ 184,142     $ 290,368
Raw materials and packaging     81,936       —  
Total   $ 266,078     $ 290,368

 

 

 

NOTE 5 – Prepaid Expenses and Other Current Assets

 

As of March 31, 2017 and June 30, 2016, prepaid expenses and other current assets were as follows:

 

    March 31, 2017  

June 30, 2016

Prepaid officers compensation   $ 1,175,011     $ 1,334,261
Prepaid directors compensation     235,531       323,855
Prepaid marketing expenses     428,021       33,000
Other prepaid expenses and current assets     80,541       25,435
Total   $ 1,919,104     $ 1,716,551

 

 

NOTE 6 – Property and Equipment

 

As of March 31, 2017 and June 30, 2016, property and equipment were as follows:

 

    March 31, 2017  

June 30, 2016

Vehicles   $ 32,598     $ 112,817
Furniture and equipment     41,042       343
Personal computers     2,914       1,170
    76,554       114,330
Less:  accumulated depreciation     21,399       22,122
Total   $ 55,155     $ 92,208

 

NOTE 7 – Investments

Dollar Shots Club

On September 18, 2015, the Company, through a series of transactions acquired 5,000,000 shares of Dollar Shots Club, Inc. (“DSC”) in exchange for 2,000,000 shares of common stock. The shares of DSC are being carried on the accompanying balance sheet based on the shares of stock given in exchange for the investment. The Company is accounting for the investment on the cost basis of accounting being that the shares represent approximately 5% of the total outstanding shares of DSC and the Company does not have any significant influence in DSC. The investment in DSC was fully impaired as of June 30, 2016.

 

  F- 9  

 

Rocky Mountain High Water Company LLC

 

In July 2016, the Company entered into a business alliance with Poafpybitty Family, LLC to launch Eagle Spirit Spring Water, a line of purified, high-alkaline spring water sourced from Native American tribal land in Oklahoma. The agreement calls for the Company to pay a royalty on each gallon of water collected at the spring. Production of filtered spring water filled bottles commenced in August 2016 and sales began in October 2016.

 

In consideration for the 20-year water and surface rights, and a related 10-year renewal option, the Company paid Poafpybitty Family, LLC cash payments of $22,500 and issued a warrant for 500,000 shares of the Company’s common stock exercisable at $.03 per share over a three-year period beginning July 27, 2016.

 

The agreement grants the Company an exclusive right to develop land adjacent to the spring for commercial purposes as agreed to by both parties. Additionally, the Company has agreed to grow hemp for experimental or commercial purposes on the land within three years.

 

On November 12, 2016, the agreement with the Poafpybitty Family was amended to give the Company a controlling voting interest of 75% of RMHW, while the Poafpybitty Family received 51% of the equity interest. The amended agreement is being accounted for as a step-acquisition, with the resulting goodwill of $49,911 included in other assets. The Company is obtaining an outside valuation of the rights to use the land and obtain the water described in the agreement. Beginning November 12, 2016, the operations of RMHW are consolidated in the financial statements of RMHB.

  

NOTE 8 – Convertible Notes Payable

 

As of March 31, 2017 and June 30, 2016, the Company’s convertible notes payable were as follows:

 

    Interest Rates   Term   March 31, 2017  

June 30, 2016

Convertible notes payable     6% - 12%     0 - 1 year     $ 785,000     $ 597,500
Discount                     (36,568 )     —  
Total                   $ 748,432     $ 597,500

 

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, interest expense on these notes, including amortization of the discount, was $36,744 and $14,902, respectively. For the nine months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, interest expense on these notes, including amortization of the discount, was $114,487 and $166,486, respectively.

 

NOTE 9 – Note Payable-Other

 

On September 1, 2016, the Company purchased used office furniture and equipment from its landlord. The Company executed a note payable in the amount of $40,122 at an interest rate of 0% and with monthly payments of $1,115. The Company imputed interest on the note and recorded a discounted note balance of $36,634 on September 1, 2016. The term of the note is three years. The balance on the note was $29,052 on March 31, 2017. For the three and nine months ended March 31, 2017, interest expense on this note was $629 and $1,339, respectively.

 

  F- 10  

 

NOTE 10 – Related Party Notes Payable

 

As of March 31, 2017 and June 30, 2016, the Company’s related party convertible notes payable were as follows:

 

    Interest Rate   Term   March 31, 2017

June 30, 2016

Related party convertible notes payable     6%       0 - 1 year     $ 214,301   $ 298,332
Discount                     (65,270)   (277,602)
Total                   $ 149,031     $20,730

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, interest expense on these notes, including amortization of the discount, was $56,564 and $0, respectively. For the nine months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, interest expense on these notes, including amortization of the discount, was $216,653 and $0, respectively.

 

As of March 31, 2017 and June 30, 2016, the Company’s related party notes payable were as follows:

 

    Interest Rates   Term   March 31, 2017  

June 30, 2016

Related party notes payable     6%     60 days       $ 110,000    $

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, interest expense on these notes was $181 and $0, respectively. For the nine months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, interest expense on these notes was $181 and $0, respectively.

 

NOTE 11 – Shareholders’ Deficit

 

Common Stock

 

During the nine months ended March 31, 2017 the Company issued 246,701,265 shares of common stock, including 76,266,598 for convertible notes payable conversions, 46,908,834 for warrant exercises, 29,424,139 for services rendered, 21,634,107 for compensation, 6,800,000 as part of a legal settlement, and 65,667,587 for cash. During the nine months ended March 31, 2016 the Company issued 101,495,350 shares of common stock for convertible notes payable conversions, the acquisition of Dollar Shots Club, cash purchases, and services rendered.

 

  F- 11  

 

On December 29, 2016 the Company executed a securities purchase agreement for the sale of 1,000,000 shares of its common stock. The agreement includes a “true-up” provision whereby the Company must provide the purchaser additional shares of common stock if the stock price is below a predetermined level six months from the date of the agreement. In accordance with this provision, the Company was also required to reserve 10,000,000 shares of common stock in the event that the true-up provision is triggered. The shares will be released if the provision is not triggered six months from the date of the agreement. The fair value of the true-up calculation was $67,000 at inception of the agreement and $11,000 as of March 31, 2017.

 

On March 14, 2017, the board of directors and holders of a majority of the voting capital stock of the Company approved an amendment to the Company’s Articles of Incorporation to increase its authorized shares of common stock by 150,000,000. The Board of Directors fixed March 14, 2017 as the record date for determining the holders of its voting capital stock entitled to notice of these actions and receipt of this Information Statement. The increase in the authorization will be effective in May 2017.

 

On March 17, 2017, our Board of Directors approved the Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc. 2017 Incentive Plan (the “2017 Incentive Plan”). The purpose of the Incentive Plan is to provide a means for the Company to continue to attract, motivate and retain management, key employees, consultants and other independent contractors, and to provide these individuals with greater incentive for their service to the Company by linking their interests in the Company’s success with those of the Company and its shareholders. The Plan provides that up to a maximum of 35,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock (subject to adjustment) are available for issuance under the Plan. The Board of Directors awards these shares at its sole discretion.

 

Also on March 31, 2017, certain of our officers and directors returned a total of 25,041,732 shares of common stock to treasury for cancellation. On that same date, we granted to each of these officers and directors an equivalent number of restricted shares of common stock under our 2017 Incentive Plan. The restricted shares so granted may not be transferred, sold, or encumbered until six (6) months from the date of issue.

 

Series A Preferred Stock

 

The Company has 1,000,000 shares of Series A Preferred Stock authorized and outstanding as of June 30, 2016 and March 31, 2017. LSW, the holder of these shares is our controlling shareholder. Lily Li, our Vice President of International Sales, is the Managing Member of LSW and, in that capacity, has the authority to direct voting and investment decisions with regard to its holdings in the company.

 

On March 13, 2017, our Board of Directors approved a Certificate of Designation for our Series A Preferred Stock. This document revises and restates the rights, preferences and features of our Series A Preferred Stock, which consists of 1,000,000 shares, all of which are issued and outstanding. Holders of our Series A Preferred Stock were formerly entitled to cast 400 votes for every share held, and shares of Series A Preferred Stock were convertible to common stock at a rate of 100 shares of common stock for every share of Series A Preferred Stock. Following the filing of the Certificate of Designation, holders of Series A Preferred Stock are now entitled to cast 1,200 votes for every share held, and shares of Series A Convertible Preferred Stock are convertible to common stock at a rate of 1,200 shares of common stock for every share of Series A Preferred Stock.

 

On March 14, 2017, the board of directors and holders of a majority of the voting capital stock of the Company approved an amendment to the Company’s Articles of Incorporation to increase its authorized shares of preferred stock by 10,000,000. The Board of Directors fixed March 14, 2017 as the record date for determining the holders of its voting capital stock entitled to notice of these actions and receipt of this Information Statement. The increase in the authorization will be effective in May 2017.

 

Series C Preferred Stock

 

The Company amended its Articles of Incorporation as of November 13, 2015 to create a Series C Preferred shares, which are 12% interest bearing, cumulative, exchangeable, non-voting, convertible preferred stock of the Company. Each Series C Preferred share can be converted to 50 shares of common stock.

 

On November 16, 2015, the holder of a convertible note aggregating $1,107,607 of principal and accrued interest, agreed to a dollar for dollar exchange for same number of Preferred C shares. As of March 31, 2017, there were 1,107,607 shares of Series C Preferred shares outstanding.

 

Series D Preferred Stock

 

The Company amended its Articles of Incorporation as of March 21, 2016 to create the Series D Preferred stock class, a non-voting, non-interest bearing convertible preferred stock. Each Series C preferred share is convertible to 100 shares of common stock. As of March 31, 2017, there are no Series D preferred shares outstanding.

 

Warrants

 

During the nine months ended March 31, 2017 the Company granted 9,037,500 common stock warrants and 38,026,204 were exercised. During the nine months ended March 31, 2016 there were no common stock warrants granted or exercised.

 

  F- 12  

 

NOTE 12– Concentrations

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2017, the Company’s two largest customers accounted for approximately 25% and 14% of sales, respectively. During the nine months ended March 31, 2017, the Company’s two largest customers accounted for approximately 7% and 55% of sales, respectively. During the three months ended March 31, 2016, the Company’s two largest customers accounted for approximately 20% and 7% of sales, respectively. During the nine months ended March 31, 2016, the Company’s two largest customers accounted for approximately 13% and 8% of sales, respectively.

 

NOTE 13 – Income Taxes

 

The reconciliation of income tax benefit at the U.S. statutory rate of 34% to the Company’s effective rate for the periods presented is as follows:

 

  Three Months Ended March 31, 2017 Three Months Ended March 31, 2016
U.S federal statutory rate (34%) (34%)
State income tax, net of federal benefit (0.0%) (0.0%)
Increase in valuation allowance 34% 34%
Income tax provision (benefit) 0.0% 0.0%

 

   

  

 

Nine Months Ended March 31, 2017 Nine Months Ended March 31, 2016
U.S federal statutory rate (34%) (34%)
State income tax, net of federal benefit (0.0%) (0.0%)
Increase in valuation allowance 34% 34%
Income tax provision (benefit) 0.0% 0.0%

 

The tax effects of temporary differences that give rise to the Company’s net deferred tax liability as of March 31, 2017 and June 30, 2016 are as follows:

 

Deferred Tax Assets   March 31, 2017   June 30, 2016
Net Operating Losses   $ 4,700,000     $ 3,200,000
Less:  Valuation Allowance   $ (4,700,000 )   $ (3,200,000)
Deferred Tax Assets - Net     —         —  

 

  As of March 31, 2017, the Company had approximately $13,800,000 of federal and state net operating loss carryovers ("NOLs"), which begin to expire in 2027. Utilization of the NOLs may be subject to limitation under the Internal Revenue Code Section 382 should there be a greater than 50% ownership change as determined under regulations.

 

In assessing the realization of deferred tax assets, management considers whether it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will be realized. The ultimate realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of future taxable income during the periods in which those temporary differences become deductible. Management considers the scheduled reversal of deferred tax liabilities, projected future taxable income and tax planning strategies in making this assessment. Based on the assessment, management has established a full valuation allowance against the entire deferred tax asset relating to NOLs for every period because it is more likely than not that all of the deferred tax asset will not be realized.

 

NOTE 14 – Commitments

 

Office Lease

 

The Company has a three-year lease for corporate office space. The lease commenced on September 1, 2016 with monthly payments of $7,715 in year one, $7,972 in year two and $8,229 in year three. The lease is being accounted for on a straight-line basis over its term.

 

Other Leases

 

The Company rents storage space from various third parties on a month-to-month basis.

 

  F- 13  

 

NOTE 15 – Legal Proceedings

 

Please refer to our Annual Report on Form 10-K filed October 4, 2016 for information regarding our pending legal proceedings. The following represents an update to the items disclosed in that filing:

 

193rd Judicial District Court of Dallas County Texas. Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc. (RMHB) FKA Totally Hemp Crazy, Inc. V Rodney Peterson (Peterson) and Rocky Mountain High Canada, Inc. (RMHC), Case #DC-16-01416; Date Filed: February 4, 2016.

 

This case has been settled as to all claims and counterclaims with the issuance of 6,800,000 shares of RMHB stock.

 

Eighteenth Judicial Circuit Court of Seminole County, Florida, Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc. v. Roy Meadows, David Meadows et al, Case No. 2016-CA-000958-15-W.

 

The Company filed suit for an injunction against continuation of the Meadows Arbitration. The arbitration is no longer applicable and is a moot issue. On April 20, 2016, false, malicious, and defamatory allegations were asserted by the Shareholder Alert inappropriately released by the Law Office of A.A. McClanahan, Meadow’s attorney.

 

The Company has filed in the Seminole Suit a Motion for Leave To Amend its current suit to add claims against Meadows for usury, cancellation of warrants and defamation as a result of the Shareholder Alert press release.

 

The Company is investigating facts surrounding Meadows and others and may amend its Florida lawsuit to seek more than $20 Million in damages and disgorgement of Meadows and Rayburn profits on questionable trading activities.

 

Meadows has filed counterclaims for the sums allegedly due on the two Convertible Promissory Notes. Discovery in this case by all parties is still in the initial stages and there is no current trial setting.

 

101st Judicial District Court of Dallas County, Texas, Case No DC-16-01220. Fanco Global Acquisitions, LLC v Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc.

 

The Court dismissed this lawsuit for the failure of the Plaintiff to prosecute its case. The case was reinstated and management believes the case will be settled.

 

NOTE 16 – Subsequent Events

 

On May 10, 2017 the Company executed a 2-year, 8%, $250,000 convertible note payable to a third party.

 

In May 2017, the Company granted 14,000,000 options to purchase common stock to two newly appointed Board directors.

 

  F- 14  

 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements, other than purely historical information, including estimates, projections, statements relating to our business plans, objectives, and expected operating results, and the assumptions upon which those statements are based, are “forward-looking statements.” These forward-looking statements generally are identified by the words “believes,” “project,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “estimates,” “intends,” “strategy,” “plan,” “may,” “will,” “would,” “will be,” “will continue,” “will likely result,” and similar expressions. Forward-looking statements are based on current expectations and assumptions that are subject to risks and uncertainties which may cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements. Our ability to predict results or the actual effect of future plans or strategies is inherently uncertain. Factors which could have a material adverse affect on our operations and future prospects on a consolidated basis include, but are not limited to: changes in economic conditions, legislative/regulatory changes, availability of capital, interest rates, competition, and generally accepted accounting principles. These risks and uncertainties should also be considered in evaluating forward-looking statements and undue reliance should not be placed on such statements.

 

Company Overview and Plan of Operation Overview

Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc. is a Nevada corporation. RMHB currently operates through its parent company, three wholly-owned subsidiaries and one minority-owned subsidiary, which the Company controls. All subsidiaries are consolidated for financial reporting purposes:

 

•             Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc., an active Nevada corporation (Parent)

 

•             Eagle Spirit Land & Water Company (Subsidiary)

 

•             Rocky Mountain High Water Company, LLC (Subsidiary-consolidated beginning November 12, 2016)

 

•             Rocky Mountain High Clothing Company, Inc., an inactive Texas Corporation (Subsidiary)

 

•             Smarterita, LLC, an inactive Texas limited liability company (Subsidiary)

 

RMHB is a consumer goods brand development company specializing in developing, manufacturing, marketing, and distributing high quality, health conscious, hemp-infused food and beverage products and spring water. The Company currently markets a lineup of five hemp-infused beverages. RMHB is also researching the development of a lineup of products containing Cannabidiol (CBD). The Company’s intention is to be on the cutting edge of the use of CBD in consumer products while complying with all state and federal laws and regulations. See New Product Pipeline below.

 

After developing the beverage products, RMHB completed its first production run in February of 2015. Since then RMHB has had production runs for hemp-infused beverages totaling over 3,700,000 cans. Each beverage contains approximately 100mg of hempseed extract, and all of the non-alcoholic beverages will consist of all-natural ingredients. The non-alcoholic products are shelf stable (no refrigeration necessary) with a shelf life of two (2) years. Packaging for our line-up of products containing cannabinoids (CBD) will be determined at a later date.

 

The Company has also produced its first production runs of Energy Shots and Relaxation Brownies. In addition, in August 2016, the Company bottled its first high alkaline spring water, Eagle Spirit Spring Water.

 

In March and April 2017, the Company completed production runs of its more popular hemp-infused beverages.

 

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Existing Products

 

The Company has developed a lineup of five hemp-infused beverages that include three energy drinks and a non-energy black tea and lemonade:

 

•          Naturally Flavored Citrus Energy Drink

 

•        A citrus energy drink that contains 100mg hempseed extract and is complemented with ginseng and guarana extract, caffeine and other ingredients.

 

•          Naturally Flavored Mango Energy Drink

 

•        A mango energy drink that contains 100mg hempseed extract and is complemented with ginseng and guarana extract, caffeine and other ingredients.

 

•          Low Calorie Coconut Energy Lime

 

•        A low calorie coconut lime energy drink that contains 100mg hempseed extract and is complemented with ginseng and guarana extract, caffeine and other ingredients.

 

•          Naturally Flavored Lemonade

 

•        A lemonade drink that contains 100mg hempseed extract and is complemented with ginseng extract and other ingredients.

 

•          Naturally Flavored Black Tea

 

•        A black tea drink that contains 100mg hempseed extract and is complemented with black tea and ginseng extract and other ingredients.

 

In May 2016, the Company executed a one-year agreement with MBA Beverage to coordinate the manufacturing of our products. MBA Beverage acts as our outsourced supply-chain management and coordinates every aspect of the manufacturing process. MBA Beverage also purchases all ingredients that are used in the manufacturing process since it has established relationships with all suppliers. MBA Beverage purchases hemp from Global Essence, Global Essence provides MBA Beverage independent third party testing documentation that all hemp used in our manufacturing process is THC free.

 

•       Blues City Brewery, LLC (“Blues City”) in Memphis, Tennessee, a subsidiary of City Brewing Company, LLC, manufactures and bottles our products. Blues City is an FDA registered facility that is audited annually to ensure compliance with FDA GMP (Good Manufacturing Practices) for food safety. MBA Beverage schedules beverage production with Blues City. The Company does not contract with Blues City directly.

 

•       Sovereign Flavors of Santa Ana, California collaborates with the Company for product formulation under an oral agreement. The Company owns the propriety formulas to our products.

 

•       Upstart Foods Marketing of St. Louis, Missouri and Advertising Arts of Brookfield, Wisconsin provide the packaging design. Once any packing design (label) is approved, Ball Metal Beverage Container Corporation or Rexam Beverage Can Company manufactures the cans. Upon completion, the cans are shipped to Blues City. Payments are made in advance to MBA Beverage. MBA Beverage, in turn, makes payments in advance at both manufacturing plants. There are no written contracts, other than with MBA Beverage and Upstart Food Marketing.

 

•       Upon completion of the production, the Company stores finished product at Blues City, awaiting sale to our distributor network.

 

•       Product is sold to distributors under a variety of terms from cash upfront to credit terms. Additionally, the Company sells through various online outlets.

 

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New Product Pipeline

 

•       Cannabinoid “CBD” infused beverages (subject to compliance with state and federal laws and regulations)

 

•      Hemp Infused Beverages - expand flavor offers and beverage line

 

•       Hemp-Infused Natural Spring Water

 

Cannabinoid “CBD”- infused Beverages

 

The CBD beverage line is in pre-development stage. Any CBD beverages will be THC-free. Therefore, these products will be 100% legal in all 50 states. Products containing Cannabidiol (CBD) can be a source of essential fatty acids, vitamin E, and trace minerals in addition to containing high amounts of protein. CBD is extracted and separated from specific varieties of cannabis, often known as hemp. Chemically, CBD is one of 85 chemical substances known as cannabinoids, which are all found in the cannabis plant. CBD is the second most abundant compound in hemp, typically representing up to 40% of its extracts. CBD is actually unrelated to the chemical chain that results in tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). They share some characteristics but are created via different paths. The chemical properties of CBD and THC vary widely enough to classify THC as a psychotropic drug strictly controlled by federal authorities, while CBD is considered a legal dietary supplement.

 

  Hemp-infused Natural Spring Water

 

Adding hemp-infused natural spring water to our beverage line is in pre-development stage. The Company plans to bottle the water, market and sell it at some point in the future. Revenue generation should commence in the same quarter.

 

Expected Changes in Number of Employees, Plant, and Equipment

 

We do not currently plan to purchase specific additional physical plant and significant equipment within the immediate future. We do not currently have specific plans to change the number of our employees during the next twelve months.

 

Results of Operations

 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2017 Compared to Three Months Ended March 31, 2016

 

Financial Summary

 

The Company’s sales for the three months ended March 31, 2017 were $117,814 compared to $157,138 for the three months ended March 31, 2016. The sales decrease was driven by a decrease in distributor sales in 2017.

 

The Company’s net loss for the three months ended March 31, 2017 was $4,469,320 compared to a net loss of $1,803,675 for the three months ended March 31, 2016.

 

Sales

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2017 sales were $117,814 compared to $157,138 for the three months ended March 31, 2016, a decrease of $39,324 or 25%. The sales decrease was driven by management’s focus on closing the LSW Holdings purchase of the control block of the Preferred Series A shares, the lack of inventory of our more popular flavors to sell, and a restructuring of our brokerage agreements with our outside brokers. In the three months ended March 31, 2017 sales consisted of approximately 74% distributor sales and 26% online sales compared to 74% distributor sales and 26% online sales for the three months ended March 31, 2016.

 

Cost of Sales

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2017, cost of sales was $56,835 or 48% of sales, compared to $77,031 or 49% of sales, for the three months ended March 31, 2016, a decrease of $20,196 or 26%. Cost of sales decreased as a percentage of sales in 2017 as a result of increased sales on the Company’s websites and sales of our water products, which sold at higher margins than our hemp-infused products.

 

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Operating Expenses

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2017, operating expenses were $1,932,809 or 1,641% of sales, compared to $1,337,315 or 851% of sales for the three months ended March 31, 2016. Areas in which the Company experienced material changes in operating expenses are discussed below.

 

General and Administrative

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2017, general and administrative expenses were $1,248,202 or 1,060% of sales, compared to $832,027 or 530% of sales for the three months ended March 31, 2016. The increase in general and administrative expenses in 2017 was driven by an increase in officer and employee compensation, rent and storage expenses, and expenses related to the startup of the Eagle Spirit Water brand.

 

Advertising and Marketing

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2017, advertising and marketing expenses were $684,607 or 581% of sales, compared to $505,288 or 322% of sales for the three months ended March 31, 2016. The increase in advertising and marketing expenses in 2017 was due to increased promotional spending, broker commissions, promotions contractors, and advertising and promotional expenses related to the startup of the Eagle Spirit water brand.

 

Other (Income) Expense

 

Interest Expense

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2017, interest expense was $133,051, compared to $14,902 for the three months ended March 31, 2016. The increase in interest expense, which includes the amortization of the discount on convertible debt and interest on Series C Preferred Stock, was due to increased debt in 2017.

 

Loss on Extinguishment of Debt

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2016, the Company recorded a loss of $945,838 on the extinguishment of debt related to the settlement of convertible debt. There was no extinguishment of debt in 2017.

 

Gain (Loss) on Change in Fair Value of Derivative Liability

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2017, the Company recorded a loss on the change in fair value of derivative liability of $2,464,439 compared to a gain of $414,273 for the three months ended March 31, 2016. In 2017, the loss resulted from the increase in the price of the Company’s underlying stock, which is used to calculate the fair value of the related derivative liability. During the three months ended March 31, 2016, the price of the Company’s stock decreased, which resulted in a decrease in the liability.

 

Income Taxes

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, the Company recorded no income tax provision due to a full valuation allowance provided on deferred tax assets resulting from net operating losses.

 

Nine Months Ended March 31, 2017 Compared to Nine Months Ended March 31, 2016

 

Financial Summary

 

The Company’s sales for the nine months ended March 31, 2017 were $438,152 compared to $746,825 for the nine months ended March 31, 2016. The sales decrease was driven by a decrease in distributor sales in 2017.

 

The Company’s net loss for the nine months ended March 31, 2017 was $7,610,013 compared to net income of $4,301,608 for the nine months ended March 31, 2016.

 

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Sales

 

For the nine months ended March 31, 2017 sales were $438,152 compared to $746,825 for the nine months ended March 31, 2016, a decrease of $308,673 or 41%. The sales decrease was driven by management’s focus on closing the LSW Holdings purchase of the control block of the Preferred Series A shares, the lack of inventory of our more popular flavors to sell, and a restructuring of our brokerage agreements with our outside brokers. During the nine months ended March 31, 2017 sales consisted of approximately 89% distributor sales and 11% online sales compared to 92% distributor sales and 8% online sales for the nine months ended March 31, 2016.

 

Cost of Sales

 

For the nine months ended March 31, 2017, cost of sales was $184,311 or 42% of sales, compared to $397,954 or 53% of sales, for the nine months ended March 31, 2016, a decrease of $213,643 or 54%. Cost of sales decreased as a percentage of sales in 2017 as a result of increased sales on the Company’s websites and sales of our water products, which sold at higher margins than our hemp-infused products. This was partially offset by the $28,837 write-off of the Company’s expired brownie inventory.

 

Operating Expenses

 

For the nine months ended March 31, 2017, operating expenses were $4,534,957 or 1,035% of sales, compared to $2,418,191 or 324% of sales for the nine months ended March 31, 2016. Areas in which the Company experienced material changes in operating expenses are discussed below.

 

General and Administrative

 

For the nine months ended March 31, 2017, general and administrative expenses were $3,101,291 or 708% of sales, compared to $1,579,251 or 212% of sales for the nine months ended March 31, 2016. The increase in general and administrative expenses in 2017 was driven by an increase in officer and employee compensation, rent and storage expenses, and expenses related to the startup of the Eagle Spirit Water brand.

 

Advertising and Marketing

 

For the nine months ended March 31, 2017, advertising and marketing expenses were $1,433,666 or 327% of sales, compared to $838,940 or 112% of sales for the nine months ended March 31, 2016. The increase in advertising and marketing expenses in 2017 was due to increased promotional spending, broker commissions, promotions contractors, and advertising and promotional expenses related to the startup of the Eagle Spirit water brand.

 

Other (Income) Expense

 

Interest Expense

 

For the nine months ended March 31, 2017, interest expense was $531,699, compared to $166,486 for the nine months ended March 31, 2016. The increase in interest expense, which includes the amortization of the discount on convertible debt and interest on Series C Preferred Stock, was due to increased debt in 2017.

 

Debt Inducement Expense

 

During the nine months ended March 31, 2016, the Company recorded debt inducement expense of $3,887,618. In order to induce the holder of certain convertible debt to convert his note, he was issued warrants to purchase 41,454,851 shares of common stock at a reduced price. The value of the inducement was $3,887,618. There was no debt inducement expense in 2017.

 

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Loss on Extinguishment of Debt

 

During the nine months ended March 31, 2016, the Company recorded a loss of $945,838 on the extinguishment of debt related to the settlement of convertible debt. There was no extinguishment of debt in 2017.

 

Gain on Change in Fair Value of Derivative Liability

 

For the nine months ended March 31, 2017, the Company recorded a loss on the change in fair value of derivative liability of $2,797,198 compared to a gain of $11,370,870 for the nine months ended March 31, 2016. In 2017 the loss resulted from the increase in the price of the Company’s underlying stock, which is used to calculate the fair value of the related derivative liability, during the nine months ended March 31, 2017. The gain in 2016 resulted from a decrease in the price of the Company’s stock and the related decrease in the derivative liability.

 

Income Taxes

 

For the nine months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, the Company recorded no income tax provision due to a full valuation allowance provided on deferred tax assets resulting from net operating losses.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As of March 31, 2017, we had current assets of $2,432,378, consisting of cash of $458, accounts receivable (net) of $246,738, inventory of $266,078, and prepaid expenses and other current assets of $1,919,104. As of March 31, 2017, we had current liabilities of $7,401573, consisting of accounts payable and accrued liabilities of $932,966, related party convertible notes payable (net) of $149,031, related party notes payable of $110,000, convertible notes payable (net) of $748,432, other notes payable of $29,052, accrued interest of $295,327, and derivative liability of $5,136,765. During the nine months ended March 31, 2017, the Company received proceeds of $1,015,532 related to private offering stock sales of 65,667,587 shares of common stock. Sales prices ranged from $.001 to $.05 per share.

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

Net cash used in operating activities during the nine months ended March 31, 2017 was $1,601,763 compared to $483,682 during the nine months ended March 31, 2016. The change was principally driven by the net loss in 2017 as compared to income in 2016 and the increases in accounts receivable and prepaid expenses during 2017. This was partially offset by the expenditures related to a hemp drink production run in 2016 with smaller corresponding production runs in 2017. Other significant changes in cash from operating activities in the nine months ended March 31, 2017 were an increase in accounts payable in 2017 of $595,100 compared to an increase of $491,414 in 2016, and the increase of deferred revenue in 2016 with no corresponding change in 2017. The non-cash loss on change in fair value of derivative liability was $2,797,198 in 2017 compared to a gain of $11,370,870 in 2016.

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

Net cash used in investing activities during the nine months ended March 31, 2017 was $85,218 compared to $64,518 during the nine months ended March 31, 2016. The change was primarily due to the Company’s investment in Rocky Mountain High Water Company.

 

Cash flows from financing activities

 

Net cash provided by financing activities during the nine months ended March 31, 2017 was $1,585,184 compared to $607,819 during the nine months ended March 31, 2016. In 2017, proceeds of $330,000 were from the issuance of convertible notes payable compared to $500,000 in 2016. The Company also issued $210,000 in related party notes payable and a $35,960 note payable for the acquisition of furniture and equipment in the nine months ended March 31, 2017 compared to $0 in 2016. Repayments on debt were $6,908 during the nine months ended March 31, 2017 and $165,000 during the nine months ended March 31, 2016. In 2017 there were proceeds of $1,015,532 from the issuance of stock compared to $238,500 in 2016.

 

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Outstanding Material Indebtedness

 

Recently, our operations have been funded primarily through the private sales of common stock or the issuance of convertible promissory notes, which are convertible to common stock at fixed prices ranging from $0.001 to $0.05, at discounts to market price ranging from 50% to 99%, or combinations thereof. Our ability to successfully execute our business plan is contingent upon us obtaining additional financing and/or upon realizing sales revenue sufficient to fund our ongoing expenses. Until we are able to sustain our ongoing operations through sales revenue, we intend to fund operations through debt and/or equity financing arrangements, which may be insufficient to fund our capital expenditures, working capital, or other cash requirements. We do not have any formal commitments or arrangements for the sales of stock or the advancement or loan of funds at this time. There can be no assurance that such additional financing will be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all.

 

During 2011 and 2012, the Company entered into a series of convertible notes with six lenders aggregating $110,000. These were one-year terms notes at 12% interest and convertible to Common Stock at a conversion price of $.05 per share. As a part of the Bankruptcy Reorganization Plan confirmed in July 2014, the accrued interest on these notes was forgiven and the notes became zero interest bearing notes. As of December 31, 2016, the principal balance on these notes was $30,000.

 

In 2012, the Company entered into a $40,000 Convertible Note Payable with an individual. The notes matured one-year from the date of issuance, bear interest at 12% per annum, and is convertible into shares of Common Stock at $.001. In 2015, the lender sold and re-assigned $17,500 of this note. The new note holders converted the $17,500 of principal into 17,500,000 shares of Common Stock. During the six months ended December 31, 2016, the holder converted the remaining principal balance of $22,500 to 25,000,000 shares of common stock.

 

On March 25, 2015, the Company entered into an amended and restated convertible promissory note with Roy Meadows, which amended two previously issued notes dated February 5, 2013 and July 17, 2014. According to the terms of the note, the Company may borrow up to an aggregate of $1,500,000. The note bears interest at 12% per annum, and the holder may demand repayment of any portion of the note after one year from the effective date of the note. The note is convertible in whole or in part at a conversion price per share equal to the lesser of $.001 per share, or at an 80% discount to the average of the five lowest bid prices during the thirty trading days prior to the date of the conversion notice. Mr. Meadows is limited in his conversions whereby he may not at any time own more than 9.99% of the Company’s outstanding common stock. Mr. Meadows may, at his option, file a UCC-1 financing statement against all assets of the Company and have a guarantee and security agreement with the principal controlling for majority shareholders of the Company. On November 16, 2015, the debt holder converted $1,107,606 of principal and accrued interest into 1,107,607 shares of Preferred C Shares of the Company. Each Series C Preferred Share can be converted to 50 Shares of Common Stock.

 

In connection with the conversion, and as an inducement for the debt holder to convert, the Company issued him warrants to purchase 41,454,851 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price per share of the lesser of $.005 or an eighty percent discount to the average of the five lowest bid prices during the 30 trading days prior to the date of exercise. The warrant may be exercised, in whole or in part, beginning on the date which is the earlier of six months from the Company becoming a Reporting Company (as defined in the warrant) or one year from the date of issuance. The warrant is for a period of 3 years, and contains customary anti-dilution provisions.

 

In October 2015, the Company entered into a $500,000 note payable at 12% simple interest for a one year period with Roy Meadows. The note is convertible upon maturity if not paid by the company prior thereto at $0.02 per share and a 25,000,000 share maximum. There is an option to renew with a fee of 10% principle and accrued interest.

 

The Company has determined that the conversion feature embedded in the notes referred to above, that contain a potential variable conversion amount, constitutes a derivative which has been bifurcated from the note and recorded as a derivative liability, with a corresponding discount recorded to the associated debt. The excess of the derivative value over the face amount of the note is recorded immediately to interest expense at inception. The discounts related to the above notes were completely amortized as of June 30 and December 31, 2016 on the accompanying balance sheet.

 

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Future Liquidity Requirements

 

The anticipated operational shortfall for the next twelve months is $1,200,000. For the next two years, we anticipate cash needs to be between $2,000,000 and $5,000,000. We anticipate raising the required capital through a blank check preferred stock, as authorized by the Company’s Articles of Incorporation. We plan to establish a new class of preferred stock and raise up to $5,000,000 under a Rule 506 subscription agreement.

 

Off Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

As of March 31, 2017, there were no off balance sheet arrangements.

 

Going Concern

 

We have experienced recurring losses from operations and to date, we have not been able to produce sufficient sales to become cash flow positive and profitable on a consistent basis. The success of our business plan during the next 12 months and beyond will be contingent upon generating sufficient revenue to cover our costs of operations and/or upon obtaining additional financing. For these reasons, our auditor has raised substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

 

On February 28, 2017, LSW Holdings, LLC (“LSW”) purchased all outstanding shares of Series A Preferred Stock from our former controlling shareholder. Accordingly, LSW is now our controlling shareholder. Our Vice President of International Sales is the Managing Member of LSW and, in that capacity, has the authority to direct voting and investment decisions with regard to its holdings in the company. The agreement between the parties requires that LSW provide the Company sufficient capital to move forward with its expansion plans.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

In December 2001, the SEC requested that all registrants list their most “critical accounting polices” in the Management Discussion and Analysis. The SEC indicated that a “critical accounting policy” is one which is both important to the portrayal of a company’s financial condition and results, and requires management’s most difficult, subjective or complex judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain. We believe that the following accounting policies currently fit this definition:

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of the financial statements in conformity with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“GAAP”) requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the dates of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting periods. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Certain of the Company’s estimates could be affected by external conditions, including those unique to its industry, and general economic conditions. It is possible that these external factors could have an effect on the Company’s estimates that could cause actual results to differ from its estimates. The Company re-evaluates all of its accounting estimates at least quarterly based on these conditions and record adjustments when necessary.

 

Cash

 

The Company considers all short-term highly liquid investments with an original maturity at the date of purchase of three months or less to be cash equivalents.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company follows the guidance of the Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 605, “Revenue Recognition.” It records revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, product delivery has occurred, the selling price to the customer is fixed or determinable and collectability of the revenue is reasonably assured. The Company has not experienced any significant returns from customers and accordingly, in management’s opinion, no reserve for returns has been provided. Payments received prior to shipment of goods are recorded as deferred revenue.

 

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  Accounts Receivable and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts Receivable

 

The Company has a policy of reserving for uncollectible accounts based on the best estimate of the amount of probable credit losses in our existing accounts receivable. We extend credit to customers based on an evaluation of their financial condition and other factors. The Company generally does not require collateral or other security to support accounts receivable and perform ongoing credit evaluations of customers and maintain an allowance for potential bad debts if required.

 

It is determined whether an allowance for doubtful accounts is required by evaluating specific accounts where information indicates the customers may have an inability to meet financial obligations. In these cases, we use assumptions and judgment, based on the best available facts and circumstances, to record a specific allowance for those customers against amounts due to reduce the receivable to the amount expected to be collected. These specific allowances are re-evaluated and adjusted as additional information is received. The amounts calculated are analyzed to determine the total amount of the allowance. The Company may also record a general allowance as necessary.

 

Direct write-offs are taken in the period when we have exhausted our efforts to collect overdue and unpaid receivables or otherwise evaluate other circumstances that indicate the collectability of receivables.

 

Inventories

 

Inventories, which consist of the Company’s product held for resale, are stated at the lower of cost, determined using the first-in, first-out, and net realizable value. Net realizable value is the estimated selling price, in the ordinary course of business, less estimated costs to complete and dispose of the product.

 

If the Company identifies excess, obsolete or unsalable items, its inventories are written down to their realizable value in the period in which the impairment is first identified. Shipping and handling costs incurred for inventory purchases and product shipments are recorded in cost of sales in the Company's statements of operations.

 

Fair Value Measurements

 

The Company adopted the provisions of ASC Topic 820, “Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures”, which defines fair value as used in numerous accounting pronouncements, establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosure of fair value measurements.

 

The estimated fair value of certain financial instruments, including cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued expenses are carried at historical cost basis, which approximates their fair values because of the short-term nature of these instruments. The carrying amounts of our short and long term credit obligations approximate fair value because the effective yields on these obligations, which include contractual interest rates taken together with other features such as concurrent issuances of warrants and/or embedded conversion options, are comparable to rates of returns for instruments of similar credit risk.

 

ASC 820 defines fair value as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. ASC 820 also establishes a fair value hierarchy, which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. ASC 820 describes three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value:

 

•      Level 1 — quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

•      Level 2 — quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets or inputs that are observable.

•      Level 3 — inputs that are unobservable (for example cash flow modeling inputs based on assumptions).

 

The derivative liability in connection with the conversion feature of the convertible debt, classified as a Level 3 liability, is the only financial liability measure at fair value on a recurring basis.

 

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The change in the Level 3 financial instrument is as follows:

 

Balance, June 30, 2016   $ 2,217,744  
Issued during the nine months ended March 31, 2017   $ 445,007  
Exercises/Conversions   $ (323,183 )
Change in fair value recognized in operations   $ 2,797,197  
Balance, March 31, 2017   $ 5,136,765  
         

The estimated fair value of the derivative instruments were valued using the Black-Scholes option pricing model, using the following assumptions as of March 31, 2017:

 

Estimate Dividends     None
Expected Volatility     3.0%
Risk Free Interest Rate     .76%
Expected Term     .1-.6 years

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment is stated at cost less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation is provided for on a straight-line basis over the useful lives of the assets. Expenditures for additions and improvements are capitalized; repairs and maintenance are expensed as incurred.

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

The Company evaluates intangible assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value of an asset may not be recoverable. The Company assesses the recoverability of the assets based on the undiscounted future cash flow and recognizes an impairment loss when the estimated undiscounted future cash flow expected to result from the use of the asset plus the net proceeds expected from disposition of the asset, if any, are less than the carrying value of the asset. When the Company identifies an impairment, it reduces the carrying amount of the asset to its estimated fair value based on a discounted cash flow approach or, when available and appropriate, to comparable market values. No impairment charges were recorded during the three or nine months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016.

 

Share-Based Payments

 

Share-based payments to employees, including grants of employee stock options, are recognized as compensation expense in the financial statements based on their fair values, in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718. That expense is recognized over the period during which an employee is required to provide services in exchange for the award, known as the requisite service period (usually the vesting period). The Company had no common stock options or common stock equivalents granted or outstanding for all periods presented.

 

The Company issued restricted stock to consultants and employees for various services. Cost for these transactions are measured at the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instruments issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The value of the common stock is to be measured at the earlier of (i) the date at which a firm commitment for performance by the counterparty to earn the equity instruments is reached or (ii) the date at which the counterparty's performance is complete.

 

Convertible Instruments

 

The Company evaluates and accounts for conversion options embedded in convertible instruments in accordance with ASC 815 “Derivatives and Hedging Activities”. Applicable GAAP requires companies to bifurcate conversion options from their host instruments and account for them as freestanding derivative financial instruments according to certain criteria. The criteria include circumstances in which (a) the economic characteristics and risks of the embedded derivative instrument are not clearly and closely related to the economic characteristics and risks of the host contract, (b) the hybrid instrument that embodies both the embedded derivative instrument and the host contract is not re-measured at fair value under other GAAP with changes in fair value reported in earnings as they occur and (c) a separate instrument with the same terms as the embedded derivative instrument would be considered a derivative instrument.

 

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Preferred Stock

 

We apply the guidance enumerated in ASC 480 “Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity” when determining the classification and measurement of preferred stock. Preferred shares subject to mandatory redemption (if any) are classified as liability instruments and are measured at fair value. We classify conditionally redeemable preferred shares (if any), which includes preferred shares that feature redemption rights that are either within the control of the holder or subject to redemption upon the occurrence of uncertain events not solely within our control, as temporary equity. At all other times, we classified our preferred shares in stockholders’ equity. Our preferred shares do not feature any redemption rights within the holders’ control or conditional redemption features not within our control. Accordingly all issuances of preferred stock are presented as a component of consolidated stockholders’ equity (deficit).

 

Advertising

 

Advertising and marketing expenses are charged to operations as incurred.

  

Income Taxes

 

The Company uses the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes in accordance with ASC Topic 740, “Income Taxes.” Under this method, income tax expense is recognized for the amount of: (i) taxes payable or refundable for the current year and (ii) deferred tax consequences of temporary differences resulting from matters that have been recognized in an entity’s financial statements or tax returns. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in the results of operations in the period that includes the enactment date. A valuation allowance is provided to reduce the deferred tax assets reported if based on the weight of the available positive and negative evidence, it is more likely than not some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.

 

ASC Topic 740.10.30 clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an enterprise’s financial statements and prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for the financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. ASC Topic 740.10.40 provides guidance on derecognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure and transition. The Company has no material uncertain tax positions.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

 

In August 2014, the FASB issued Accounting Standard Update No. 2014-15, Presentation of Financial Statements—Going Concern (Subtopic 205-40), (ASU No. 2014-15), which requires management to assess an entity’s ability to continue as a going concern by incorporating and expanding upon certain principles that are currently in U.S. auditing standards. Specifically, ASU 2014-15 provides a definition of the term substantial doubt and requires an assessment for a period of one year after the date that the financial statements are issued (or available to be issued). It also requires certain disclosures when substantial doubt is alleviated as a result of consideration of management’s plans and requires an express statement and other disclosures when substantial doubt is not alleviated. ASU No. 2014-15 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2016, and early application is permitted.

 

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers . This guidance requires companies to recognize revenue in a manner that depicts the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in amounts that reflect the consideration to which a company expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. The new standard also will result in enhanced disclosures about the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from contracts with customers. The guidance is effective for public company fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017. The standard allows for either a full retrospective or a modified retrospective transition method. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this standard, including the transition method, on its consolidated results of operations, financial position and cash flows.

 

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

 

A smaller reporting company is not required to provide the information required by this Item.

 

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Item 4. Controls and Procedures

 

We carried out an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) as of March 31, 2017. This evaluation was carried out under the supervision and with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer, Michael Welch, and our Chief Financial Officer, Jens Mielke. Based upon that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that, as of March 31, 2017, our disclosure controls and procedures are not effective. There have been no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting during the quarter ended March 31, 2017.

 

Our management identified the following material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, which are indicative of many small companies with small staff: (i) inadequate segregation of duties and effective risk assessment; and (ii) insufficient written policies and procedures for accounting and financial reporting with respect to the requirements and application of both US GAAP and SEC guidelines.

 

Disclosure controls and procedures are controls and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed or submitted under the Exchange Act are recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the SEC's rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

Limitations on the Effectiveness of Internal Controls

 

Our management does not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures or our internal control over financial reporting will necessarily prevent all fraud and material error. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the internal control. The design of any system of controls also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Over time, control may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

 

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PART II – OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

 

Please refer to our Annual Report on Form 10-K filed October 4, 2016 for information regarding our pending legal proceedings. The following represents an update to the items disclosed in that filing:

 

193rd Judicial District Court of Dallas County Texas. Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc. (RMHB) FKA Totally Hemp Crazy, Inc. V Rodney Peterson (Peterson) and Rocky Mountain High Canada, Inc. (RMHC), Case #DC-16-01416; Date Filed: February 4, 2016.

 

This case has been settled as to all claims and counterclaims with the issuance of 6,800,000 shares of RMHB stock.

 

Eighteenth Judicial Circuit Court of Seminole County, Florida, Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc. v. Roy Meadows, David Meadows et al, Case No. 2016-CA-000958-15-W.

 

The Company filed suit for an injunction against continuation of the Meadows Arbitration. The arbitration is no longer applicable and is a moot issue. On April 20, 2016, false, malicious, and defamatory allegations were asserted by the Shareholder Alert inappropriately released by the Law Office of A.A. McClanahan, Meadow’s attorney.

 

The Company has filed in the Seminole Suit a Motion for Leave To Amend its current suit to add claims against Meadows for usury, cancellation of warrants and defamation as a result of the Shareholder Alert press release.

 

The Company is investigating facts surrounding Meadows and others and may amend its Florida lawsuit to seek more than $20 Million in damages and disgorgement of Meadows and Rayburn profits on questionable trading activities.

 

Meadows has filed counterclaims for the sums allegedly due on the two Convertible Promissory Notes. Discovery in this case by all parties is still in the initial stages and there is no current trial setting.

 

101st Judicial District Court of Dallas County, Texas, Case No DC-16-01220. Fanco Global Acquisitions, LLC v Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc.

 

The Court dismissed this lawsuit for the failure of the Plaintiff to prosecute its case. The case was reinstated and management believes the case will be settled.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

A smaller reporting company is not required to provide the information required by this Item.

 

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Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

   

The following equity securities were issued between February 14, 2017 and May 14, 2017:

 

Date Name Shares Issued Issue Price Description Exemption
2/14/2017-2/27/2017 Investors 4,379,365 .02-.05 Shares Sold Rule 506
2/27/2017-3/27/2017 Vendors 11,381,600 .0416-.084 Services Rendered Section 4(2)
2/22/2017-3/31/2017 Various directors, officers, and employees 10,700,550 .042-.0575 Services Rendered Section 4(2)
3/01/2017 Investor 505,096 0.01 Note Payable Conversion Rule 506
4/10/2017-4/13/2017 Vendors 450,000 0.084 Services Rendered Section 4(2)

 

 

Item 3. Defaults upon Senior Securities

 

None

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 5. Other Information

 

None.

 

Item 6. Exhibits

 

 Exhibit Number Description of Exhibit
31.1 Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
31.2 Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
32.1 Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
101 Materials from the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2016 formatted in Extensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL)

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc.

 

Date: May 15, 2017

 

 

By: /s/ Michael Welch

Michael Welch

Title: President and Chief Executive Officer

 

Date: May 15, 2017

 

 

By: /s/ Jens Mielke

Jens Mielke

Title: Chief Financial Officer

 

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CERTIFICATIONS

 

I, Michael Welch, certify that;

 

1.   I have reviewed this quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2017 of Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc. (the “registrant”);

 

2.   Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

 

3.   Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

 

4.   The registrant’s other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:

 

a.   Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

 

b.   Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

 

c.   Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and

 

d.   Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant's fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

 

5.   The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):

 

a.   All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

 

b.   Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Date: May 15, 2017

 

/s/ Michael Welch

By: Michael Welch

Title: Chief Executive Officer

CERTIFICATIONS

 

I, Jens Mielke, certify that;

 

1.   I have reviewed this quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2017 of Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc. (the “registrant”);

 

2.   Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

 

3.   Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

 

4.   The registrant’s other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:

 

a.   Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

 

b.   Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

 

c.   Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and

 

d.   Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant's fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

 

5.   The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):

 

a.   All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

 

b.   Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Date: May 15, 2017

 

/s/ Jens Mielke

By: Jens Mielke

Title: Chief Financial Officer

CERTIFICATION OF CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER AND

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

PURSUANT TO

18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350,

AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

 

In connection with the quarterly Report of Rocky Mountain High Brands, Inc. (the “Company”) on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2017 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Report”), I, Michael Welch, Chief Executive Officer of the Company, and I, Jens Mielke, Chief Financial Officer of the Company, certify, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that:

 

1.              The Report fully complies with the requirements of Section 13(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and

 

2.              The information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the consolidated financial condition of the Company as of the dates presented and the consolidated result of operations of the Company for the periods presented.

 

 

By: /s/ Michael Welch
Name: Michael Welch
Title: Principal Executive Officer
Date: May 15, 2017

 

By: /s/ Jens Mielke
Name: Jens Mielke
Title: Principal Financial Officer
Date: May 15, 2017

 

This certification has been furnished solely pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.