UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

(mark one)

 

☒    ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended July 31, 2016

or

 

☐    TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from _______to _________

 

Commission File Number: 001-15687

 

DIGERATI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

Nevada   74-2849995
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
  (IRS Employer
Identification No.)

 

3463 Magic Drive, Suite 355
San Antonio, Texas

  78229
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)   (Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code: (210) 614-7240

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: NONE

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

 

Common Stock, Par Value $0.001 Per Share

(Title of Class)

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. ☐ Yes ☒ No

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. ☐ Yes ☒ No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. ☒ Yes ☐ No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). ☒ Yes ☐ No

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.

 

Large accelerated filer Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer Smaller reporting company

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). ☐ Yes ☒ No

 

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the issuer was $1,360,882 based on the closing price of $0.26 per share on October 25, 2016 , as reported on the over-the-counter bulletin board.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed all documents and reports required to be filed by Section 12, 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 subsequent to the distributions of securities under a plan confirmed by a court. ☐ Yes ☒ No

 

There were 5,234,165 shares of issuer’s Common Stock outstanding as of October 25, 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

    Page
  PART I  
Item 1. Business 3
Item 1A. Risk Factors 8
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 8
Item 2. Properties 8
Item 3. Legal Proceedings 9
Item 4. (Removed and Reserved) 9
     
  PART II  
     
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity; Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 9
Item 6. Selected Financial Data 10
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 10
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk 13
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 14
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosures 29
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures 29
Item 9B. Other Information 30
     
  PART III  
     
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 31
Item 11. Executive Compensation 33
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters 36
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence 37
Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services 37
     
  PART IV  
     
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules 38
     
SIGNATURES  40

 

 

 

 

PART I

 

ITEM 1.     BUSINESS.

 

Digerati Technologies, Inc., a Nevada corporation (including our subsidiaries, “we”, “us”, or “Digerati”), is a diversified holding company that has no independent operations apart from its subsidiaries. Digerati was formed in 2004 as the successor to a business originally commenced by Latcomm International, Inc., a Canadian company formed in 1994. We began providing communication services in 1995 along the U.S.-Mexico corridor to capitalize on the opportunities created by the deregulation of the telecommunication industries within Latin America. Our principal business in the past has been providing transportation of voice traffic for other telecommunication service providers, wireless carriers and regional Internet telephony providers using Voice over Internet Protocol (“VoIP”) technologies. Our wholly owned subsidiary, Shift8 Technologies, Inc. (“Shift8”), offers a portfolio of Internet-based telephony products and services through our cloud telephony application platform and session-based communication network that is interconnected with numerous U.S. and foreign service providers.

 

During FY 2016 Flagship Energy Company ("Flagship"), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Digerati, entered into a Purchase and Sale Agreement (“PSA”) with a Texas-based contract-for-hire oil and gas operator (“Operator”). Under the PSA, Flagship has utilized Operator for the drilling, completion and initial operations of a shallow oil and gas well in conjunction with the purchase of 100% of Operator’s Working Interest and 80% of its Net Revenue Interest. Under the PSA, the Operator has agreed to transfer all field-level operations and assign 100% of a certain oil, gas and mineral lease to Flagship upon demand, which includes a tract of land located in South Texas. Additionally, Flagship entered into a Joint Operating Agreement ("JOA") with Operator, whereby the parties agree to develop the oil and gas well or wells for the production and retrieval of oil and gas commodities as provided for in the oil, gas and mineral lease.  

 

Until July 2014, Digerati owned a waste disposal business focused on disposing of solid and liquid wastes from drilling sites and an oilfield services business providing skid houses, telecommunication services, booster booths, portable restrooms, generators, potable water, and mess halls to drilling contractors and oil companies in the Bakken region of Montana and North Dakota. B oth of these subsidiaries were sold for an aggregate sale price of $41,500,000. See Note 3 in the consolidated financial statements.

 

Products and Services

 

We provide a comprehensive suite of Internet-based communication services to meet the global needs of businesses that are seeking simple, flexible, and cost effective communication solutions. Our Internet-based services include fully hosted IP/PBX services, IP Trunking, call center applications, interactive voice response auto attendant, call recording, simultaneous calling, voicemail to email conversion and multiple customized IP/PBX features in a hosted or cloud environment for specialized applications. Our services are specifically designed for the needs of the small to medium-sized business, enterprise customers, call centers with international communication requirements, and regional Internet service providers that do not have the scale necessary to acquire their own telephony infrastructure.

 

In addition, we operate a VoIP network for processing voice communication services to U.S. and foreign telecommunications companies that lack transmission facilities, require additional capacity or do not have the regulatory licenses to terminate traffic in Mexico, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America.

 

Voice over Internet Protocol Networks

 

The basic technology of traditional telecommunications systems was designed for slow mechanical switches. Communications over the traditional telephone network are routed through circuits that must dedicate all circuit resources to each call from its inception until the call ends, regardless of whether anyone is actually talking on the circuit. This circuit-switching technology incurs a significant cost per call and does not efficiently support the integration of voice with data services. Data networks, however, were designed for electronic switching. They break the data stream into small, individually addressed packages of data (“packets”) that are routed independently of each other from the origin to the destination. Therefore, they do not require a fixed amount of bandwidth to be reserved between the origin and destination of each call and they do not waste bandwidth when it is not being used for actual transmission of information. This allows multiple voice or voice and data calls to be pooled, resulting in these networks being able to carry more calls with an equal amount of bandwidth. Moreover, they do not require the same complex switching methods required by traditional voice telephone networks, instead using a multiplicity of routers to direct each packet to its destination and automatically routing packets around blockages, congestion or outages.

 

  3  

 

 

Packet switching can be used within a data network or across networks, including the public Internet. The Internet itself is not a single data network owned by any single entity, but rather a loose interconnection of networks belonging to many owners that communicate using the Internet Protocol (“IP”). By converting voice signals to digital data and handling the voice signals as data, it can be transmitted through the more efficient switching networks designed for data transmissions and through the Internet using the IP. The transmission of voice signals as digitalized data streams over the Internet is known as Voice over Internet Protocol or “VoIP”. A VoIP network has the following advantages over traditional networks:

 

  Simplification: An integrated infrastructure that supports all forms of communication allows more standardization, a smaller equipment complement, and less equipment management.
   
  Network Efficiency: The integration of voice and data fills up the data communication channels efficiently, thus providing bandwidth consolidation and reduction of the costs associated with idle bandwidth. This combined infrastructure can support dynamic bandwidth optimization and a fault tolerant design. The differences between the traffic patterns of voice and data offer further opportunities for significant efficiency improvements.
     
  Co-existence with traditional communication mediums: IP telephony can be used in conjunction with existing public telephone system switches, leased and dial-up lines, PBXs and other customer premise equipment, enterprise LANs, and Internet connections. IP telephony applications can be implemented through dedicated gateways, which in turn can be based on open standards platforms for reliability and scalability.
     
  Cost reduction: Under the VoIP network, the connection is directly to the Internet backbone and as a result the telephony access charges and settlement fees are avoided. 

  

The growth of voice over the Internet was limited in the past due to poor sound quality caused by technical issues such as delays in packet transmission and by bandwidth limitations related to Internet network capacity and local access constraints. However, the continuing addition of data network infrastructure, improvements in packet switching and compression technology, new software algorithms and improved hardware have substantially reduced delays in packet transmissions and resulted in better sound quality. Nevertheless, certain VoIP routes into countries with limited or poor Internet infrastructure continue to lack the consistent quality required for voice transport and termination.

 

We believe that the infrastructure required for a global network is too expensive for most companies to acquire and deploy on their own. As a result, many companies use a network consisting of a combination of gateways owned by different operators. For a network to achieve optimal functionality and quality, however, the gateways need to be interoperable, or able to communicate with one another. Technological solutions have emerged that support interoperability between different protocols and/or gateways. Cisco Systems, Inc. has emerged as a dominant supplier of VoIP gateways and other manufacturers often seek to make their equipment interoperable with Cisco.

 

Long distance telephone calls transported over the Internet are less expensive than similar calls carried over the traditional telephone network primarily because the cost of using the Internet is not determined by the distance those calls need to travel. Also, routing calls over the Internet is more cost-effective than routing calls over the traditional telephone network because the technology that enables Internet telephony is more efficient than traditional telephone network technology. The greater efficiency of the Internet creates cost savings that can be passed on to the consumer in the form of lower long distance rates or retained by the carrier as higher margins.

 

By using the public Internet, VoIP providers like us are able to avoid direct payment for transport of communications, instead of paying for large “pipes” into the public Internet, billed by bandwidth rather than usage, which transmits calls to a distant gateway. The Internet, which has its origins in programs devised by the Department of Defense to provide multiple routes and therefore redundancy which was largely immune from the failure of a single network element, provides great redundancy and can be “self healing” in the event of an outage in a particular network element or transmission path. Moreover, adding an additional entry or exit point (a Point of Presence or “PoP”) does not require any expensive or time consuming reconfiguration or reprogramming of existing network elements. The new element is simply installed with a specific IP address and it can send or receive information to or from any other IP address on the Internet.

 

  4  

 

 

Cloud Communications

 

Cloud communications are Internet-based voice and data communications where telecommunications applications, switching and storage are hosted by a third-party service provider outside of the organization using the services. Services are accessed by the user over the public Internet. Cloud telephony refers specifically to voice services and more specifically the replacement of conventional business telephone equipment (such as a PBX) with VoIP service hosted by a third-party service provider and delivered over the Internet.

 

We operate a cloud communication network that consists of a VoIP switching system and cloud telephony application platform. Our network allows us to provide end-to-end cloud telephony solutions designed to provide significant benefits to businesses of all sizes, with single or multiple locations. The integration of our cloud communication platform and global VoIP network allows us to provide our customers with virtually any type of telephony solution on a global basis.

 

Our cloud communication solutions are designed to minimize upfront capital costs, increase the scalability and flexibility of the customer’s communications network and service environment, provide robust features and functionality to increase productivity and reduce the overall cost of communications.

 

Strategy

 

Our strategy is to target the small to medium-sized business market through distributors and Value Added Resellers (“VARs”) that we enable with our communication network. Our typical VAR is an information technology services firm, traditional PBX vendor, managed service provider, or systems integrator that has established relationships with businesses in its local market. These VARs are currently providing local customer support for other IT or PBX services, but lack the technology infrastructure to provide cloud communication and VoIP services to their customers. Our strategy allows these VARs to focus on their strength of providing first tier support to their customers while we provide the second and third tier technical support required to operate a cloud communication and VoIP network. In addition, we transform our VARs’ business model by introducing new cloud telephony services and adding a new and lucrative recurring revenue stream that increases the VARs’ value proposition for its current and prospective customers.

 

Our cloud-based technology platform enables our VARs to deliver enhanced voice services to their business customers. The features supported on our cloud communication platform include all standard telephone features and value-added applications such as voicemail to email, VoIP peering, teleconferencing, IVR auto attendant, and dial-by-name directory. Our system allows the VAR and its customers a migration path from a traditional PBX system to a complete cloud-based PBX solution.

 

Our strategic initiatives to successfully meet our long-term business objectives include:

 

Repositioning around our cloud and session-based communication services, segments of the industry that are experiencing significant growth and where there are new business opportunities for us.

 

Emphasis on our sales distribution model that enables our VARs to offer cloud and session-based communication services to the enterprise market in various regions and industries.

 

Leverage our existing global network and relationships to provide new and innovative VoIP solutions in high demand by enterprise customers.

 

Continue enhancing our infrastructure and back office system to streamline operations, automate key processes, and support the scalability of our VAR distribution model.

 

  5  

 

 

Competitive Conditions

 

The cloud services industry, including the provisioning of cloud communications services, cloud connectivity, cloud storage and cloud computing, as well as carrier voice and data services, is highly competitive, rapidly evolving and subject to constant technological change and intense marketing by providers with similar products and services. We expect that new, smaller, but very agile carrier competitors, specializing in providing service to regional and emerging markets at low margin and hence low cost, may have an impact on the carrier market. Similarly, the business services market includes competitors who may be significantly larger and have substantially greater market presence, financial, technical, operational and marketing resources than we do, including Tier 1 carriers, cable companies and premise-based solutions providers. In the event that such a competitor expends significant sales and marketing resources in one or several markets where we compete with them, we may not be able to compete successfully in those markets. Specialized cloud services providers, who focus on one or more cloud service or application, could adopt aggressive pricing and promotion practices that could impact our ability to compete. We also believe that competition will continue to increase, placing downward pressure on prices. Such pressure could adversely affect our gross margins if we are not able to reduce our costs commensurate with the price reductions of our competitors. In addition, the pace of technological change makes it impossible for us to predict whether we will face new competitors using different technologies to provide the same or similar services offered or proposed to be offered by us. If our competitors were to provide better and more cost effective services than ours, we may not be able to increase our revenues or capture any significant market share.

 

The long distance telephony market and the Internet telephony market are highly competitive. Our competitors include major telecommunications carriers in the U.S., foreign telecommunications carriers (which may be owned by foreign governments), and numerous small competitors. We expect to face continuing competition based on price and service offerings from existing competitors and new market entrants in the future. The principal competitive factors in our market include price, coverage, customer service, technical response times, reliability, and network size/capacity. The competitive landscape is rapidly altering the number, identity and competitiveness of the marketplace, and we are unable to determine with certainty the impact of potential consolidation in our industry.

 

A number of large long distance carriers have introduced services that make Internet telephony or voice services over the Internet available to other carriers. All major telecommunications companies either presently do or could route traffic to destinations worldwide and compete directly with us. Emerging Internet telephony service providers also offer low-cost Internet telephony services from personal computers to telephones and from telephones to telephones. In addition, Internet service providers and other companies currently in related markets are now providing voice over the Internet services or have adapted their products to enable voice over the Internet services. These related companies may migrate into the Internet telephony market as direct competitors.

 

Many of our competitors have substantially greater financial, technical and marketing resources, larger customer bases, longer operating histories, greater name recognition and more established relationships in the industry than we have. As a result, certain of these competitors may be able to adopt more aggressive pricing policies that could hinder our ability to market our services. We believe that our key competitive advantages are our ability to deliver reliable, high quality voice service over the Internet in a cost-effective manner and our VAR distribution model. We cannot provide assurances, however, that these advantages will enable us to succeed against comparable service offerings from our competitors.

 

  6  

 

 

Government Regulation

 

VoIP and other communications services, like ours, have been subject to less regulation at the state and federal levels than traditional telecommunications services. Providers of traditional telecommunications services are subject to the highest degree of regulation, while providers of VoIP and other information services are largely exempt from most federal and state regulations governing traditional common carriers. The FCC has subjected VoIP service providers to a smaller subset of regulations that apply to traditional telecommunications service providers and has not yet classified VoIP services as either telecommunications or information. The FCC is currently examining the status of VoIP service providers and the services they provide in multiple open proceedings. In addition, many state regulatory agencies impose taxes and other surcharges on VoIP services, and certain states take the position that offerings by VoIP providers are intrastate telecommunications services and therefore subject to state regulation. These states argue that if the beginning and end points of communications are known, and if some of these communications occur entirely within the boundaries of a state, the state can regulate that offering. We believe that the FCC has preempted states from regulating VoIP offerings in the same manner as providers of traditional telecommunications services. However, this issue has not been resolved definitively as a matter of law, and it remains possible that the FCC could determine that such services are not information services, or that there could be a judicial or legislative determination that the states are not preempted from regulating VoIP services as traditional telecommunications services. We cannot predict how or when these issues will be resolved or its potential future impact on our business at this time.

 

The effect of any future laws, regulations and orders on our operations, including, but not limited to, our cloud-based communications and collaboration services, cannot be determined. But as a general matter, increased regulation and the imposition of additional funding obligations increases service costs that may or may not be recoverable from our customers, which could result in making our services less competitive with traditional telecommunications services if we increase our prices or decreasing our profit margins if we attempt to absorb such costs.

 

Federal, state, local and foreign governmental organizations are considering other legislative and regulatory proposals that would regulate and/or tax applications running over the Internet. We cannot predict whether new taxes will be imposed on our services, and depending on the type of taxes imposed, whether and how our services would be affected thereafter. Increased regulation of the Internet may decrease its growth and hinder technological development, which may negatively impact the cost of doing business via the Internet or otherwise materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Regulation of Internet-based Telecommunication Services in the United States

 

We have the necessary authority under Section 214 of the Communications Act to operate as a domestic and international carrier. We are considered a non-dominant domestic interstate carrier subject to minimal regulation by the FCC. We are not required to obtain FCC authority to initiate or expand our domestic interstate operations, but we are required to obtain FCC approval to transfer control or discontinue service and are required to file various reports and pay various fees and assessments. In addition, we must offer service on a nondiscriminatory basis at just and reasonable rates and are subject to the FCC’s complaint jurisdiction. Generally, our international carrier traffic is subject to minimal regulation by state and local jurisdictions.

 

The FCC requires Internet voice communications service providers, such as our company, to provide E-911 service in all geographic areas covered by the traditional wire-line E-911 network. Under the FCC’s rules, Internet voice communications providers must transmit the caller’s phone number and registered location information to the appropriate public safety answering point, or PSAP, for the caller’s registered location. The FCC also requires interconnected VoIP service providers to make Universal Service Fund (“USF”) contributions. We believe that our services are currently compliant with all applicable requirements of the FCC, and we have made and are making the required contributions to the USF. However, should we at some time fail to meet certain requirements or fail to make required contributions, we could be subject to revocation of our authority to operate or to fines or penalties.

 

Some states have tried to directly regulate VoIP services on an intrastate basis, but these efforts have not held up to court challenges to date. Many states are holding hearings to research and discuss the issues surrounding the regulation of VoIP services. Others are encouraging or even requesting VoIP service providers to subject themselves to public service commission jurisdiction and obtain certification as telephone companies. However, most have adopted a “wait and see” attitude. We monitor the actions of the various state regulatory agencies to ensure that we are in compliance with the applicable regulations, including any new regulations that may be passed. However, there can be no assurance that we will become aware of all applicable requirements on a timely basis, or that we will always be fully compliant with applicable rules and regulations. Should we fail at any time to be compliant with applicable state regulations, or to file required reports to state regulatory agencies, we could be subject to fines or other penalties.

 

  7  

 

 

Other regulations affecting the Internet in the United States.

 

Congress has enacted legislation that regulates certain aspects of the Internet, including online content, user privacy and taxation. In addition, Congress and other federal entities are considering other legislative and regulatory proposals that would further regulate the Internet. Congress has, for example, considered legislation on a wide range of issues including Internet spamming, database privacy, gambling, pornography and child protection, Internet fraud, privacy and digital signatures. Various states have adopted and are considering Internet-related legislation. Increased U.S. regulation of the Internet may slow its growth, particularly if other governments follow suit, which may negatively impact the cost of doing business over the Internet and materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and future prospects.

 

International Regulation

 

The regulatory treatment of Internet telephony outside of the U.S. varies widely from country to country. A number of countries that currently prohibit competition in the provision of voice telephony also prohibit Internet telephony. Other countries permit but regulate Internet telephony. Some countries will evaluate proposed Internet telephony service on a case-by-case basis and determine whether it should be regulated as a voice service or as another telecommunications service. In many countries, Internet telephony has not yet been addressed by legislation or regulation. Increased regulation of the Internet and/or Internet telephony providers or the prohibition of Internet telephony in one or more countries could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, operating results and future prospects.

 

The International Settlements Policy governs settlements between U.S. carriers’ and foreign carriers’ costs of terminating traffic over each other’s networks. The FCC enacted certain changes in rules designed to allow U.S. carriers to propose methods to pay for international call termination that deviate from traditional accounting rates and the International Settlement Policy. The FCC has also established lower benchmarks for the rates that U.S. carriers can pay foreign carriers for the termination of international services and these benchmarks may continue to decline. These rule changes have lowered the costs of our competitors to terminate traffic in the United States and are contributing to the downward pricing pressure facing us in the market.

 

Customers and Suppliers

 

We rely on various suppliers to provide services in connection with our communication services. We use various global VoIP companies to complete our voice over Internet traffic between US, Mexico, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America. Our customers include traditional carriers, telephony resellers and other VoIP carriers. We are not dependent upon any single supplier or customer.

 

Employees

 

As of July 31, 2016, we had 7 employees, all of whom performed operational, technical and administrative functions. We believe our future success will depend to a large extent on our continued ability to attract and retain highly skilled and qualified employees. We consider our employee relations to be good. None of these aforementioned employees belongs to labor unions.

 

ITEM 1A.    RISK FACTORS.

 

Not Applicable to smaller reporting companies.

 

ITEM 1B.    UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.

 

Not Applicable to smaller reporting companies.

 

ITEM 2.     PROPERTIES.

 

Our executive office is located at 3463 Magic Drive, Suite 355, San Antonio, Texas, in leased space consisting of 1,090 square feet. The lease for this facility is on a month to month basis. We pay annual rent of $7,740. We believe that our leased facilities are suitable and adequate for their intended use.

 

  8  

 

 

ITEM 3.     LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.

 

On May 1, 2014, Recap Marketing & Consulting LLP, Rainmaker Ventures II, Ltd and WEM Equity Capital Investments, Ltd. filed an arbitration claim pursuant to the Bankruptcy Settlement Agreement. On July 19, 2014, the arbitrator entered a decision that Recap Marketing & Consulting LLP was entitled to the transfer of 20,600 shares of Digerati Common Stock that were outstanding as of the date of the November Transactions and reflected on Digerati's stockholder list as being held by other stockholders who were principals of Recap Marketing & Consulting, LLP. Recap Marketing & Consulting LLP and Rainmaker Ventures II, Ltd. subsequently challenged the findings of the arbitrator by filing a motion to vacate in In Re Digerati Technologies, Inc. On November 23, 2015,the Bankruptcy Court issued an order dismissing the motion to vacate.

 

ITEM 4.     MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not Applicable.

 

PART II

 

ITEM 5.      MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES.

 

Market for Common Equity

 

Our common stock is quoted on the OTC Bulletin Board under the symbol “DTGI”. The following table sets forth the high and low bid prices for our common stock for the two most recently completed fiscal years, as reported by Bloomberg, LP. Price quotations on the OTC Bulletin Board reflect inter-dealer prices, without retail mark-up, markdown or commission, and may not necessarily represent actual transactions.

 

Fiscal 2015   Low     High  
First Quarter   $ 0.10     $ 0.20  
Second Quarter   $ 0.11     $ 0.33  
Third Quarter   $ 0.19     $ 0.50  
Fourth Quarter   $ 0.14     $ 0.22  

 

Fiscal 2016   Low     High  
First Quarter   $ 0.13     $ 0.47  
Second Quarter   $ 0.15     $ 0.60  
Third Quarter   $ 0.25     $ 0.34  
Fourth Quarter   $ 0.16     $ 0.38  

 

Holders

 

As of October 20, 2016, there were approximately 863 record holders of our Common Stock.

 

Dividends

 

We have not paid cash dividends on our common stock because we have not generated sufficient earnings. We do not anticipate paying a dividend in the future and expect to use all available earnings to provide funds for growth of our business.

 

  9  

 

 

Equity Compensation Plans

 

The following table provides information regarding securities that have been or are authorized to be issued under our equity compensation plans as of July 31, 2016.

 

    Number of Securities to be Issued Upon Exercise of Outstanding Options, Warrants and Rights     Weighted-Average Exercise Price of Outstanding Options, Warrants and Rights     Number of Securities Remaining Available for Future Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans  
                   
Equity Compensation plans approved by security holders   -0-

N/A

      -0-  
                         
Equity Compensation Plans not approved by security holders     121,135     $ 0.18       7,378,865  
                         
Total     121,135     $ 0.18       7,378,865  

 

Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

None

 

ITEM 6.     SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA.

 

Not Applicable to smaller reporting companies.

 

ITEM 7.     MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.

 

SPECIAL NOTE: This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended and Section 21E of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. “Forward looking statements” are those statements that describe management’s beliefs and expectations about the future. We have identified forward-looking statements by using words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “could,” “estimate,” “may,” “expect,” and “intend,” or words of similar import. Although we believe these expectations are reasonable, our operations involve a number of risks and uncertainties and actual results may be materially different than our expectations.

 

The following is a discussion of the consolidated financial condition and results of operations for the fiscal years ended July 31, 2016 and 2015. It should be read in conjunction with our Consolidated Financial Statements, the Notes thereto, and the other financial information included elsewhere in this annual report on Form 10-K. For purposes of the following discussion, fiscal 2016 or 2016 refers to the year ended July 31, 2016 and fiscal 2015 or 2015 refers to the year ended July 31, 2015.

 

History  

 

Digerati Technologies, Inc., a Nevada corporation (including our subsidiaries, “we,” “us,” or “Digerati”), was formed in 2004 as the successor to a business originally commenced by Latcomm International, Inc., a Canadian company formed in 1994. We began providing communication services in 1995 along the U.S.-Mexico corridor to capitalize on the opportunities created by the deregulation of the telecommunication industries within Latin America. Through FY 2012 our principal business was providing transportation of voice traffic for other telecommunication service providers, wireless carriers and regional Internet telephony providers using Voice over Internet Protocol (“VoIP”) technologies. Our wholly-owned subsidiary, Shift8 Technologies, Inc. (“Shift8”), offers a portfolio of Internet-based telephony products and services through our cloud application platform and session-based communication network, which is interconnected to numerous U.S. and foreign service providers.

 

  10  

 

 

During FY 2016 Flagship Energy Company ("Flagship"), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Digerati, entered into a Purchase and Sale Agreement (“PSA”) with a Texas-based contract-for-hire oil and gas operator (“Operator”). Under the PSA, Flagship has utilized Operator for the drilling, completion and initial operations of a shallow oil and gas well in conjunction with the purchase of 100% of Operator’s Working Interest and 80% of its Net Revenue Interest. Under the PSA, the Operator has agreed to transfer all field-level operations and assign 100% of a certain oil, gas and mineral lease to Flagship upon demand, which includes a tract of land located in South Texas. Additionally, Flagship entered into a Joint Operating Agreement ("JOA") with Operator, whereby the parties agree to develop the oil and gas well or wells for the production and retrieval of oil and gas commodities as provided for in the oil, gas and mineral lease.  

 

Until July 2014, Digerati owned a waste disposal business focused on disposing of solid and liquid wastes from drilling sites and an oilfield services business providing skid houses, telecommunication services, booster booths, portable restrooms, generators, potable water, and mess halls to drilling contractors and oil companies in the Bakken region of Montana and North Dakota.

 

Sources of revenue:

 

Global VoIP Services : We currently provide VoIP communication services on a limited basis to U.S. and foreign telecommunications companies that lack transmission facilities, require additional capacity or do not have the regulatory licenses to terminate traffic in Mexico, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America. Typically, these telecommunications companies offer their services to the public for domestic and international long distance services.

 

Cloud-based hosted Services : We provide enhanced VoIP services to resellers and enterprise customers. The service include fully hosted IP/PBX services, IP trunking, call center applications, interactive voice response auto attendant, call recording, simultaneous calling, voicemail to email conversion, and multiple customized IP/PBX features in a hosted environment for specialized applications.

 

Direct Costs:

 

Global VoIP Services: We incur transmission and termination charges from our suppliers and the providers of the infrastructure and network. The cost is based on rate per minute, volume of minutes transported and terminated through the network. Additionally, we incur fixed Internet bandwidth charges and per minute billing charges. In some cases we incur installation charges from certain carriers. These installation costs are passed on to our customers for the connection to our VoIP network.

 

Cloud-based hosted Services : We incur bandwidth and co-location charges in connection with enhanced VoIP Services. The bandwidth charges are incurred as part of the connection between our customers to allow them access to our services.

 

Results of Operations

 

Global VoIP Services. Global VoIP services revenue decreased by $1,000, or 2%, from fiscal 2015 to fiscal 2016. The decrease in revenue is attributable primarily to the price pressure in our industry due to a reduction of international termination, the overall reduction in the number of carriers connected to our network, and our de-emphasis of our wholesale carrier business.

 

Cloud Communication Services . Cloud communication services revenue decreased by $14,000, or 6%, from fiscal 2015 to fiscal 2016. The decrease in revenue between periods is primarily attributed to the decrease in customers that generated significant monthly recurring hosted services revenue. Hosted services include fully hosted IP/PBX services, IP trunking, call center applications, prepaid services, interactive voice response auto attendant, call recording, simultaneous calling, voicemail to email conversion, SIP trunking and multiple other IP/PBX features in a hosted environment.

 

C ost of Services (exclusive of depreciation and amortization). The consolidated cost of services decreased by $25,000, or 15%, from 2015 to 2016. The decrease in cost of services is a direct correlation to the decline in Global VoIP services revenue and decline in Cloud Communication Services.

 

  11  

 

 

Selling, General and Administrative (SG&A) Expenses. SG&A expenses increased by $262,000, or 34%, from 2015 to 2016. The increase is attributed to the addition of a new employee for one of our new subsidiaries with an emphasis in the oil and gas services and the addition of a new sales person for our Cloud-based hosted services.

 

Legal and professional fees . Legal and professional fees decreased by $59,000, or 23%, from 2015 to 2016. The decrease is attributed to the emphasis in controlling legal and professional fees during the period.

 

Bad debt. Bad debt decreased by $17,000, or 100%. The Company did not recognized bad debt during the period ended July 31, 2016, however during the period ended July 31, 2015 the Company recognized $17,000 of bad debt for accounts that were deemed uncollectable.

 

Depreciation and amortization . Depreciation and amortization remained comparable between periods.

 

Operating loss . The Company reported an operating loss of $1,116,000 for 2016 compared to an operating loss of $939,000 for 2015. The increase in operating loss between periods is primarily attributed to the decrease in revenue and the increase in SG&A expenses between periods.

 

Other income (expense) . Other income (expense) improved by $25,000, or 51% from 2015 to 2016. The primary reason for the improvement in other income (expense) is attributed to the decrease between periods in gain (loss) on derivative instruments and disposal of fixed assets of approximately $29,000.

 

Net income (loss) attributed to Digerati Technologies, Inc. Net income (loss) attributed to Digerati Technologies, Inc. increased by $152,000 or 15%, from the year ended July 31, 2015 to the year ended July 31, 2016. The increase in net income (loss) attributed to Digerati Technologies; Inc. is as a result of the decrease in revenue and the increase in SG&A expenses between periods.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Cash Position: We had a consolidated cash balance of $1,169,000 as of July 31, 2016. Net cash provided by operating activities during the year July 31, 2016 was approximately $1,378,000, primarily as a result of accrued liabilities. Cash used in investing activities was $214,000 primarily for the acquisition of property & equipment and oil and gas property. Cash consumed by financing activities during the year ended July 31, 2016 was approximately $14,000 pursuant to the net reduction in various promissory notes during the period ended July 31, 2016. Overall, our net operating, investing and financing activities during the year ended July 31, 2016 generated approximately $1,169,000 of cash.

 

We are currently taking initiatives to reduce our overall cash deficiencies on a monthly basis. During fiscal 2017 we anticipate reducing fixed costs, professional fees and general expenses. To strengthen our business we intend to invest in a new marketing and sales strategy to grow our monthly recurring revenue; we anticipate utilizing our value added resellers to tap into new sources of revenue streams, we have also secured various agent agreements to accelerate revenue growth. In addition, we will continue to focus on selling a greater number of comprehensive services to our existing customer base. Further, in an effort to increase our revenues, we will continue to evaluate the acquisition of various assets with emphasis in VoIP Services and Cloud Communication Services, in addition to evaluating multiple oil and gas properties, as a result we anticipate incurring significant legal and professional fees during the due diligence process.

 

Our current cash expenses are expected to be approximately $85,000 per month, including wages, rent, utilities and corporate professional fees. As described elsewhere herein, we are not generating sufficient cash from operations to pay for our ongoing operating expenses, or to pay our current liabilities. As of July 31, 2016 our total liabilities were approximately $3,835,000. We will continue to use our available cash on hand to cover our deficiencies in operating expenses.

 

  12  

 

 

We estimate that we need approximately $500,000 of additional working capital to fund our ongoing operations. Additionally, we have an accumulated Stockholders’ Deficit of approximately $78,076,000, which raises substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

 

We will continue to work with various funding sources to secure additional debt and equity financings. During the period ending July 31, 2016 we secured $25,000 from a promissory note from a related party. However, there can be no assurance that we will be successful in executing the aforementioned plans and be able to continue as a going concern.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Revenue Recognition. We derive our revenue from Global VoIP Services and Cloud Communication Services. Revenue is recognized when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, service or network capacity has been provided, the price is fixed or determinable, collectability is reasonably assured and there are no significant obligations remaining.

 

We record and report our revenue on the gross amount billed to our customers in accordance with the following “gross indicators”:

 

  Digerati is the primary obligor in its arrangements,
     
  Digerati has latitude in establishing pricing,
     
  Digerati changes the product or performs part of the service and is involved in the determination of the product or service specifications,
     
  Digerati has discretion in supplier selection; and
     
  Digerati assumes credit risk for the amount billed to the customer 

 

We recognize revenue from Global VoIP Services in the period the service is provided, net of revenue reserves for potential billing credits. Such credits can result from disagreements with customers regarding the duration, destination or rates charged for each call. We recognize Cloud Communication Services revenue during the period the services are provided.

 

Stock-based Compensation. We account for share-based compensation in accordance with provisions on share-based payments which require measurement of compensation cost for all stock-based awards at fair value on the date of grant and recognition of compensation over the service period for awards expected to vest. The fair value of stock options is determined using the Black-Scholes valuation model. There were no stock options granted during 2015 and 2016. But we issued 121,135 common shares during 2016 to various employees as part of our profit sharing plan contribution. At the time of issuance we recognized stock based compensation expense of approximately $22,000, equivalent to the market value of the shares issued calculated based on the share's closing price at the grant dates.

 

Derivative financial instruments . We do not use derivative instruments to hedge exposures to cash flow, market, or foreign currency risks. However, we evaluate the application of derivative accounting for all convertible financial instruments and freestanding warrants.

 

For derivative financial instruments that meet the definition of liabilities, the derivative instrument is initially recorded at its fair value and is then re-valued at each reporting date, with changes in the fair value reported as charges or credits to income. For option-based derivative financial instruments, we use the Black-Scholes option-pricing model to value the derivative instruments. The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is re-assessed at the end of each reporting period. Derivative instrument liabilities are classified in the balance sheet as current or non-current based on whether or not net-cash settlement of the derivative instrument could be required within 12 months of the balance sheet date.

 

ITEM 7A.     QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK.

 

Not Applicable to smaller reporting companies.

 

  13  

 

   

ITEM 8.     FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

  Page
   
Consolidated Financial Statements of Digerati Technologies, Inc. and Subsidiaries  
   
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm 15
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of July 31, 2016 and 2015 16
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Years Ended July 31, 2016 and 2015 17
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Deficit for the Years Ended July 31, 2016 and 2015 18
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Years Ended July 31, 2016 and 2015 19
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements 20

 

  14  

 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders

Digerati Technologies, Inc.

San Antonio, Texas

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Digerati Technologies, Inc. and its subsidiaries (collectively, “Digerati”) as of July 31, 2016 and July 31, 2015, and the related consolidated statements of operations, stockholders’ deficit and cash flows for the years then ended. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of Digerati’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. Digerati is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audits included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of Digerati’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Digerati as of July 31, 2016 and July 31, 2015 and the consolidated results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the years then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that Digerati will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements, Digerati suffered losses from operations and has a working capital deficit, which raises substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans regarding those matters are also described in Note 2. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

/s/ LBB & Associates Ltd., LLP  

LBB & Associates Ltd., LLP

Houston, Texas

 

October 24, 2016

 

  15  

 

 

PART 1. FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

  

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

  

DIGERATI TECHNOLOGIES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands)

 

    July  31,     July 31,  
    2016     2015  
             
ASSETS            
CURRENT ASSETS:            
Cash and cash equivalents   $ 1,169     $ 19  
Accounts receivable, net     2       1  
Prepaid and other current assets     8       1  
Total current assets     1,179       21  
                 
LONG-TERM ASSETS:                
Intangible assets, net     29       44  
                 
Property and equipment, net     3       2  
Oil and gas property     210       -  
                 
Total assets   $ 1,421     $ 67  
                 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT                
CURRENT LIABILITIES:                
Accounts payable   $ 770     $ 940  
Accounts payable - related parties     19       -  
Accrued liabilities     2,906       271  
Current portion of long term debt - related party     -       43  
Total current liabilities     3,695       1,254  
                 
LONG-TERM LIABILITIES:                
Customer deposits     140       138  
Total long-term liabilities     140       138  
                 
Total liabilities     3,835       1,392  
                 
Commitments and contingencies                
                 
STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT:                
Preferred stock, 50,000,000 shares authorized, none issued and outstanding     -       -  
Common stock, $0.001, 150,000,000 shares authorized, 5,234,165 and 5,113,030  issued and outstanding, respectively     5       5  
Additional paid in capital     75,656       75,634  
Subscription receivable     -       (29 )
Accumulated deficit     (78,076 )     (76,936 )
Other comprehensive income     1       1  
Total stockholders' deficit     (2,414 )     (1,325 )
Total liabilities and stockholders' deficit   $ 1,421     $ 67  

  

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements

 

  16  

 

 

DIGERATI TECHNOLOGIES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS 

(In thousands, except per share amounts)

 

    Years ended July 31,  
    2016     2015  
OPERATING REVENUES:            
Global VoIP services   $ 48     $ 49  
Cloud-based hosted services     232       246  
                 
Total operating revenues     280       295  
                 
OPERATING EXPENSES:                
Cost of services (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)     143       168  
Selling, general and administrative expense     1,039       777  
Legal and professional fees     196       255  
Bad debt     -       17  
Depreciation and amortization expense     18       17  
Total operating expenses     1,396       1,234  
                 
OPERATING LOSS     (1,116 )     (939 )
                 
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE):                
Loss on derivative instruments and disposal of fixed assets     -       (29 )
Gain (loss) on debt extinguishment     2       (7 )
Interest income (expense)     (26 )     (13 )
Total other income (expense)     (24 )     (49 )
                 
NET LOSS ATTRIBUTED TO DIGERATI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.   $ (1,140 )   $ (988 )
                 
LOSS PER SHARE - BASIC AND DILUTED ATTRIBUTED TO DIGERATI TECHNOLOGIES, INC. SHAREHOLDERS   $ (0.22 )   $ (0.27 )
                 
WEIGHTED AVERAGE COMMON SHARES OUTSTANDING - BASIC AND DILUTED     5,183,817       3,683,646  

  

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements

 

  17  

 

  

DIGERATI TECHNOLOGIES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT

YEARS ENDED JULY 31, 2016 AND 2015

(In thousands, except for share amounts)

 

                Additional                 Other        
    Common     Paid-in     Subscription     Accumulated     Comprehensive        
    Shares     Par     Capital     Receivable     Deficit     Income     Totals  
BALANCE, July 31, 2014     1,977,626     $ 2     $ 75,161     $ -     $ (75,948 )   $ 1     $ (784 )
Stock issued for services     492,356       -       118       -       -       -       118  
Stock issued for debt & cash     2,643,048       3       348       (29 )     -       -       322  
Loss on debt extinguishment     -       -       7       -       -       -       7  
Net loss     -       -       -       -       (988 )     -       (988 )
BALANCE, July 31, 2015     5,113,030     $ 5     $ 75,634     $ (29 )   $ (76,936 )   $ 1     $ (1,325 )
Stock issued for services, to employees     121,135       -       22       -       -       -       22  
Stock issued for debt & cash     -       -       -       29       -       -       29  
Net loss     -       -       -       -       (1,140 )     -       (1,140 )
BALANCE, July 31, 2016     5,234,165     $ 5     $ 75,656     $ -     $ (78,076 )   $ 1     $ (2,414 )

    

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements

 

  18  

 

 

DIGERATI TECHNOLOGIES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(In thousands)

 

    Years ended July 31,  
    2016     2015  
             
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:            
Net loss   $ (1,140 )   $ (988 )
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to cash (used in) provided by operating activities:                
(Gain) loss on debt extinguishment     -       7  
(Gain) loss on derivative instruments and disposal of fixed assets     (2 )     29  
Depreciation, amortization and accretion     18       17  
Bad debt expense     -       17  
Stock compensation     22       118  
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:                
Accounts receivable     (1 )     (9 )
Prepaid expenses and other current assets     (7 )     156  
Accounts payable     (168 )     (24 )
Accounts payable - related parties     19       7  
Accrued liabilities and customer deposits     2,637       25  
Net cash provided by (used in ) operating activities     1,378       (645 )
                 
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:                
Acquisition of oil and gas property     (210 )     -  
Purchases of property & equipment     (4 )     (3 )
Net cash used in investing activities     (214 )     (3 )
                 
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:                
Subscription receivable proceeds     29       -  
Issuance of common stock     -       282  
Payments on debt, related party     (68 )     (2 )
Proceeds from notes payable, related party     25       40  
Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities     (14 )     320  
                 
INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS     1,150       (328 )
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, beginning of period     19       347  
                 
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, end of period   $ 1,169     $ 19  
                 
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURES:                
Cash paid for interest   $ 4     $ -  
NON-CASH TRANSACTIONS:                
Notes payable repaid with common stock   $ -     $ 40  
Repayment of liabilities with restricted cash   $ -     $ 1,838  

  

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements

 

  19  

 

 

DIGERATI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

NOTE 1 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Description of Business. Digerati Technologies, Inc. (“we”, “our”, “Digerati”) was incorporated in the state of Nevada on May 24, 2004. Digerati is a diversified holding company that has no independent operations apart from its subsidiaries. Through our wholly owned subsidiary, Shift8 Technologies, Inc., we are an established cloud telephony service provider that offers a comprehensive suite of cloud communication services to meet the global needs of businesses that are seeking simple, flexible, and cost effective communication solutions. Unlike legacy phone systems, our telephony services are delivered Only in the Cloud...™ , or over the Internet, making service available to customers from anywhere internet access is available.

 

Principles of Consolidation. The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Digerati, and its subsidiaries, which are majority owned by Digerati In accordance with ASC 810-10-05. All significant inter-company transactions and balances have been eliminated.

 

Reclassifications. Certain amounts in the consolidated financial statements of the prior year have been reclassified to conform to the presentation of the current year for comparative purposes.

 

Use of Estimates. In preparing financial statements, management makes estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities in the balance sheet and revenue and expenses in the statement of operations. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Concentration of Credit Risk. Financial instruments that potentially subject Digerati to concentration of credit risk consist primarily of trade receivables. In the normal course of business, Digerati provides credit terms to its customers. Accordingly, Digerati performs ongoing credit evaluations of its customers and maintains allowances for possible losses, which, when realized, have been within the range of management’s expectations. Digerati maintains cash in bank deposit accounts, which, at times, may exceed federally insured limits. Digerati has not experienced any losses in such accounts and Digerati does not believe it’s exposed to any significant credit risk on cash and cash equivalents.

 

Revenue Recognition. Digerati derives revenue from two product offerings Global VoIP Services and Cloud Communication Services. Revenue is recognized when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, services have been provided, the price is fixed or determinable, collectability is reasonably assured and there are no significant obligations remaining.

 

Digerati records and reports its revenue on the gross amount billed to its customers in accordance with the following indicators:

 

Digerati is the primary obligor in its arrangements,
     
Digerati has latitude in establishing pricing,
     
Digerati changes the product or performs part of the service and is involved in the determination of the product or service specifications,
     
Digerati has discretion in supplier selection and
     
Digerati assumes credit risk for the amount billed to the customer.

 

Sources of revenue:

 

Global VoIP Services: We currently provide VoIP communication services to U.S. and foreign telecommunications companies that lack transmission facilities, require additional capacity or do not have the regulatory licenses to terminate traffic in Mexico, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America. Typically, these telecommunications companies offer their services to the public for domestic and international long distance services

 

  20  

 

 

Cloud Communication Services : We provide cloud communication services to value-added resellers and enterprise customers. The service includes fully hosted IP/PBX services, IP trunking, call center applications, prepaid services, interactive voice response auto attendant, call recording, simultaneous calling, voicemail to email conversion, and multiple customized IP/PBX f eatures in a hosted or cloud environment for specialized applications.

 

Cost of Services:

 

Global VoIP Services: We incur transmission and termination charges from our suppliers and the providers of the infrastructure and network. The cost is based on rate per minute, volume of minutes transported and terminated through the network. Additionally, we incur fixed Internet bandwidth charges and per minute billing charges. In some cases we incur installation charges from certain carriers. These installation costs are passed on to our customers for the connection to our VoIP network.

 

Cloud Communication Services : We incur bandwidth, licensing, and co-location charges in connection with cloud communication services. The bandwidth charges are incurred as part of the connection between our customers to allow them access to our services.

 

Cash and cash equivalents. The Company considers all bank deposits and highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less to be cash and cash equivalents.

 

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts.

 

Bad debt expense is recognized based on management’s estimate of likely losses each year based on past experience and an estimate of current year uncollectible amounts. As of July 31, 2016 and 2015, Digerati’s allowance for doubtful accounts balance was $0 and $0, respectively.

 

Property and equipment. Property and equipment is recorded at cost. Additions are capitalized and maintenance and repairs are charged to expense as incurred. Gains and losses on dispositions of equipment are reflected in operations. Depreciation is provided using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets, which are one to five years.

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets. Digerati reviews the carrying value of its long-lived assets annually or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the value of an asset may no longer be appropriate. Digerati assesses recoverability of the carrying value of the asset by estimating the future net cash flows expected to result from the asset, including eventual disposition. If the future net cash flows are less than the carrying value of the asset, an impairment loss is recorded equal to the difference between the asset’s carrying value and fair value.

 

Derivative financial instruments . Digerati does not use derivative instruments to hedge exposures to cash flow, market, or foreign currency risks. However, Digerati analyzes its convertible instruments and free-standing instruments such as warrants for derivative liability accounting.

 

For derivative financial instruments that are accounted for as liabilities, the derivative instrument is initially recorded at its fair value and is then re-valued at each reporting date, with changes in the fair value reported as charges or credits to income. For option-based derivative financial instruments, Digerati uses the Black-Scholes option-pricing model to value the derivative instruments.

 

The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is re-assessed at the end of each reporting period. Derivative instrument liabilities are classified in the balance sheet as current or non-current based on whether or not net-cash settlement of the derivative instrument is probable within the next 12 months from the balance sheet date.

 

Income taxes. Digerati recognizes deferred tax assets and liabilities based on differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities using the enacted tax rates and laws that are expected to be in effect when the differences are expected to be recovered. Digerati provides a valuation allowance for deferred tax assets for which it does not consider realization of such assets to be more likely than not.

 

  21  

 

 

Since January 1, 2007, Digerati accounts for uncertain tax positions in accordance with the authoritative guidance issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board on income taxes which addresses how an entity should recognize, measure and present in the financial statements uncertain tax positions that have been taken or are expected to be taken in a tax return. Pursuant to this guidance, Digerati recognizes a tax benefit only if it is “more likely than not” that a particular tax position will be sustained upon examination or audit. To the extent the “more likely than not” standard has been satisfied, the benefit associated with a tax position is measured as the largest amount that is greater than 50% likely of being realized upon settlement. Currently, we have $2,622,867 in accrued liabilities as of July 31, 2016 and no liability for unrecognized tax benefits was recorded as of July 31, 2015.

 

Stock-based compensation. Digerati accounts for share-based compensation in accordance with the provisions on share-based payments which require measurement of compensation cost for all stock-based awards at fair value on date of grant and recognition of compensation over the service period for awards expected to vest. The fair value of stock options is determined using the Black-Scholes valuation model.

 

Basic and diluted net loss per share. The basic net loss per common share is computed by dividing the net loss by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding. Diluted net loss per common share is computed by dividing the net loss adjusted on an “as if converted” basis, by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding plus potential dilutive securities. For the year ended July 31, 2016 and 2015, potential dilutive securities had an anti-dilutive effect and were not included in the calculation of diluted net loss per common share.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments. Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. A fair value hierarchy is used which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The fair value hierarchy based on the three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value are as follows:

 

Level 1 – Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

 

Level 2 – Observable inputs other than Level 1 prices, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities.

 

Level 3 – Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are financial instruments whose values are determined using pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies, or similar techniques, as well as instruments for which the determination of fair value requires significant judgment or estimation.

 

For certain of our financial instruments, including cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued expenses, the carrying amounts approximate fair value due to the short maturity of these instruments. The carrying value of our long-term debt approximates its fair value based on the quoted market prices for the same or similar issues or the current rates offered to us for debt of the same remaining maturities.

 

Our derivative liabilities as of July 31, 2016 and 2015 were $0 and were valued using Level 3 inputs.

 

Recently issued accounting pronouncements. Digerati does not expect the adoption of any recently issued accounting pronouncements to have a significant impact on Digerati’s results of operations, financial position or cash flows.

 

  22  

 

 

NOTE 2 – GOING CONCERN

 

Financial Condition

 

Digerati’s consolidated financial statements for the year ending July 31, 2016 have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the settlement of liabilities in the normal course of business. Digerati has incurred net losses and accumulated a deficit of approximately $78,076,000 and a working capital deficit of approximately $2, 516,000 which raises substantial doubt about Digerati’s ability to continue as a going concern.

 

Management Plans to Continue as a Going Concern

 

Management believes that current available resources will not be sufficient to fund the Company’s operations over the next 12 months. The Company’s ability to continue to meet its obligations and to achieve its business objectives is dependent upon, among other things, raising additional capital or generating sufficient revenue in excess of costs. At such time as the Company requires additional funding, the Company will seek to secure such additional funding from various possible sources, including the public equity market, private financings, sales of assets, collaborative arrangements and debt. If the Company raises additional capital through the issuance of equity securities or securities convertible into equity, stockholders will experience dilution, and such securities may have rights, preferences or privileges senior to those of the holders of common stock or convertible senior notes. If the Company raises additional funds by issuing debt, the Company may be subject to limitations on its operations, through debt covenants or other restrictions. If the Company obtains additional funds through arrangements with collaborators or strategic partners, the Company may be required to relinquish its rights to certain technologies. There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to raise additional funds, or raise them on acceptable terms. If the Company is unable to obtain financing on acceptable terms, it may be unable to execute its business plan, the Company could be required to delay or reduce the scope of its operations, and the Company may not be able to pay off its obligations, if and when they come due.

 

The Company will continue to work with various funding sources to secure additional debt and equity financings. However, Digerati cannot offer any assurance that it will be successful in executing the aforementioned plans to continue as a going concern.

 

Digerati’s consolidated financial statements as of July 31, 2016 do not include any adjustments that might result from the inability to implement or execute Digerati’s plans to improve our ability to continue as a going concern.

 

NOTE 3 – CHAPTER 11 REORGANIZATION

 

On May 30, 2013, Digerati Technologies, Inc., Debtor in Possession (“Digerati”) filed a voluntary petition in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Texas, Houston Division (the “Bankruptcy Court”), Case No. 13-33264 (the “Bankruptcy”). Digerati filed the petition seeking relief under the provisions of Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code for the primary purpose of streamlining litigation.

 

On April 4, 2014 (the “Confirmation Date”), the Bankruptcy Court entered an Agreed Order Confirming Joint Plan of Reorganization Filed by Plan Proponents (“Agreed Order”) confirming the Plan Proponents’ Joint Chapter 11 Plan of Reorganization as modified on the record on April 4, 2014 and/or as modified by the Agreed Order (the “Reorganization Plan”). As used herein, the term “Reorganized Debtor” refers to Digerati Technologies, Inc., a Nevada corporation, after the Confirmation Date and as reorganized by the Reorganization Plan.

 

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Summary of the Plan

 

This summary is not intended to be a complete description of the Reorganization Plan, and it is qualified in its entirety by reference to the Agreed Order, Reorganization Plan, Plan Supplement and Disclosure Statement. A copy of the Agreed Order and Reorganization Plan were filed as exhibits to Digerati’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 11, 2014.

 

(a) The Agreed Order provided final approval of the Disclosure Statement, a copy of which was filed as an exhibit to Digerati’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 23, 2014.

 

(b) Upon the Confirmation Date, the Reorganized Debtor had 1,977,626 shares of common stock outstanding. All outstanding shares of Digerati’s preferred stock, warrants, options, conversion rights and other rights to acquire shares of common stock and all “super voting” shares were cancelled.

 

(c) The Reorganized Debtor’s Board of Directors consisted of Messrs. Arthur L. Smith, William E. McIlwain and James J. Davis. The Reorganized Debtor’s officers, who served at the discretion of the board of directors until the Stockholder Meeting, were:

 

  Arthur L. Smith President and Chief Executive Officer
  Antonio Estrada Jr. Chief Financial Officer

 

Subsequently, on September 15, 2014, the Company held its Annual Meeting of Shareholders, and at the discretion of the new directors, Mr. Smith and Mr. Estrada continued to serve as officers of the Reorganized Debtor.

 

(d) The Reorganized Debtor was required to hold a Stockholder Meeting to elect a new board of directors after August 31, 2014, and before September 15, 2014. The Reorganized Debtor’s officers and directors, as well as the parties to the BSA and a Rule 11 Mediated Settlement Agreement dated January 14, 2014 (the “Rule 11 Agreement”), were not eligible for election to the new board of directors at the Stockholder Meeting. Messrs. Smith and Estrada were not permitted to solicit proxies in connection with the Stockholder Meeting but were allowed to vote shares of common stock owned by them. Subsequently, on September 15, 2014, the Company held its Annual Meeting of Shareholders, and new directors were elected.

 

(e) Under the Reorganization Plan title to the issued and outstanding shares of Dishon Disposal, Inc., a North Dakota corporation (“Dishon”), and Hurley Enterprises, Inc., a Montana corporation (“Hurley”), owned by Digerati were transferred to a Grantor Trust subject to existing liens and the Rule 11 Agreement. The Dishon and Hurley shares did not vest in the Reorganized Debtor and remained the property of Digerati’s bankruptcy estate. Additionally, under the Reorganization Plan certain retained litigation claims were transferred to the Grantor Trust. The beneficiary of the Grantor Trust is the Reorganized Debtor. The trustee and Disbursing Agent of the Grantor Trust is Mr. William R. Greendyke. All other assets of Digerati that are not transferred to the Grantor Trust and/or retained by Digerati vested in the Reorganized Debtor as of the Confirmation Date, including but not limited to the common stock of Shift8 Technologies, Inc., free and clear of liens, claims and encumbrances.

 

(f) All of the issued and outstanding shares of Dishon and Hurley were sold by the Grantor Trust and the proceeds from the sale were distributed by the trustee and Disbursing Agent to discharge certain allowed claims. The claims distribution set forth in the Reorganization Plan were as follows:

 

(i) Allowed priority claims were paid in full from cash on hand.

 

(ii) Allowed administrative claims will be paid from the proceeds of the sale of the Dishon and Hurley shares except for those amounts paid pursuant to the budget attached to the Reorganization Plan. The Company estimated the maximum potential amount of any federal income tax liability on the gains derived from the sale of the Dishon and Hurley shares and deposited that amount into a reserve account until determination of the actual taxes due.

 

(iii) Proceeds from the sale of the Dishon shares in excess of $1,250,000 plus one-half of Digerati’s unpaid professional fees (the “Dishon Carve Out”) and amount reserved for taxes were delivered to creditors holding $30,000,000 of Digerati’s indebtedness secured by the Dishon shares, up to the principal of and accrued interest on such indebtedness. In addition, the secured creditors maintain a right to seek a refund if the estimated amount withheld for taxes on the sale of the Dishon shares exceeds the tax obligation.

 

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(iv) Proceeds from the sale of the Hurley shares in excess of $1,250,000 plus one-half of Digerati’s unpaid professional fees (the “Hurley Carve Out”) and amount reserved for taxes were delivered to creditors holding $30,000,000 of Digerati’s indebtedness secured by the Hurley shares, up to the principal of and accrued interest on such indebtedness. In addition, the secured creditors maintain a right to seek a refund if the estimated amount withheld for taxes on the sale of the Hurley shares exceeds the tax obligation. Principal of or interest on Digerati’s indebtedness secured by the Hurley shares that is in excess of the net proceeds from the sale of Hurley shares has been waived.

 

(v) Allowed unsecured claims of $1,000 or less were paid in full from cash on hand.

 

(vi) Allowed unsecured claims greater than $1,000 were paid in full from the Dishon Carve Out and the Hurley Carve Out. The excess from the combined $2,500,000 withheld from the sale of the Dishon shares and Hurley shares will be applied to the unpaid professional fees.

 

(vii) All cure payments under assumed contracts were paid within 90 days of April 4, 2014.

 

(viii) All executory contracts of Digerati were rejected except as previously assumed by order in the Bankruptcy Court or specifically listed as assumed in the Reorganization Plan.

 

(ix) The Reorganized Debtor released Messrs. Arthur L. Smith, Antonio Estrada, William E. McIlwain and James J. Davis in their individual capacity and their respective capacities as officers and/or directors, as applicable, of Digerati, Hurley or Dishon of all claims and causes of action that arise on or before the Confirmation Date that could be asserted by Digerati, the estate and/or on account of the Bankruptcy through the Stockholder Meeting. The Reorganized Debtor also released Messrs. Arthur L. Smith, William McIlwain and James Davis to the greatest extent provided by law from any claims.

 

(x) The Reorganization Plan became effective on December 31, 2014.

 

NOTE 4 – INTANGIBLE ASSETS

 

During fiscal 2008, Digerati made a loan of $150,000 to NetSapiens Inc. The note receivable had a maturity date of June 26, 2008 with interest at 8% per year. The note was secured by NetSapiens’ proprietary Starter Platform License and SNAPsolution modules. On June 26, 2008 Digerati converted the outstanding interest and principal balance into a lifetime and perpetual NetSapiens’ License. The License provides Digerati with the ability to offer Hosted PBX ( Private Branch eXchange), IP Centrex application, prepaid calling, call center, conferencing, messaging and other innovative telephony functionality necessary to offer standard and/or custom services to the Residential and Enterprise markets. The NetSapiens’ License is being amortized equally over a period of 10 years.

 

NOTE 5 - PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

 

Following is a summary of Digerati’s property and equipment at July 31, 2016 and 2015 (in thousands):

 

    Useful lives   2016     2015  
Telecom equipment & software   1-5 years   $ 14     $ 9  
Less: accumulated depreciation         (11 )     (7 )
Net–property and equipment       $ 3     $ 2  

 

For the years ended July 31, 2016 and 2015, depreciation and amortization totaled approximately $18,000 and $17,000, respectively.

 

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NOTE 6 – DEBT

 

At July 31, 2016 and 2015, outstanding debt consisted of the following: (In thousands).

 

    July 31,
2016
    July 31,
2015
 
Note payable to Arthur L. Smith, bearing interest of 3.00% per annum, maturity October 31, 2015, unsecured. (See details below)   $ -     $ 43  
                 
Total outstanding long-term debt   $ -     $ 43  
Current portion of long-term debt     -       (43 )
Long-term debt, net of current portion   $ -     $ -  

 

In November 2013, Shift8 Networks, Inc., an operating subsidiary of Digerati, entered into a note payable with Mr. Arthur L. Smith, in the amount of $46,755. The note had an implied annual interest rate of 0% and a maturity date of February 28, 2014. Subsequently, Mr. Smith agreed to extend the maturity date of the promissory note to November 30, 2014 and later agreed to extend the maturity date to April 30, 2015. On January 31, 2015, Shift8 Networks and Mr. Smith agreed to renew and extend the maturity date on the promissory note to October 31, 2015. The renewed note had an implied annual interest rate of 3%. On October 9, 2015 Shift8 Networks paid off the total outstanding principal balance and accrued interest.

 

On August 21, 2015 the Company entered into a short term promissory note payable for $25,000 with Craig K. Clement, the Company’s Chairman of the Board. The note had an implied annual interest rate of 0% and a maturity date of October 31, 2015. On October 15, 2015 the Company paid off the total outstanding principal balance.

 

NOTE 7 – INCOME TAXES

 

Digerati files a consolidated tax return. The current tax year is subject to examination by the Internal Revenue Service and certain state taxing authorities. As of July 31, 2016, Digerati had net operating loss carry-forwards of approximately $1,023,000 to reduce future federal income tax liabilities. Income tax benefit (provision) for the years ended July 31, 2016 and 2015 are as follows:

 

The effective tax rate for Digerati is reconciled to statutory rates as follows:

 

    2016     2015  
Expected Federal benefit (provision), at statutory rate     35.0 %     35.0 %
Change in valuation allowance     (35.0 )%     (35.0 )%
      0.0 %     0.0 %

 

Deferred tax assets are comprised of the following as of July 31, 2016 and 2015:

 

    2016     2015  
Net operating loss carryover   $ 358,000     $ 6,433,000  
Valuation allowance     (358,000 )     (6,433,000 )
Total deferred tax asset, net   $ -     $ -  

 

At July 31, 2016, realization of Digerati’s deferred tax assets was not considered likely to be realized. The change in the valuation allowance for 2016 was approximately $6,075,000. Management has evaluated and concluded that there are no significant uncertain tax positions requiring recognition in Digerati’s combined financial statements. The current year remains open to examination by the major taxing jurisdictions in which Digerati is subject to tax.

 

As a result of the reverse split in 2013 outstanding common shares was 1,977,626 as of July 31, 2014 and the sale of 2,279,412 common shares in January 2015 resulted in a change of control and the net operation loss became subject to the separate return limitation year, thus the net operating loss was reduced. The Company files a calendar year return and the net operating loss was adjusted for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2016.

 

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We record unrecognized tax benefits as liabilities in accordance with ASC 740 and adjust these liabilities when our judgment changes as a result of the evaluate on new information not previously available. Because of the complexity of some of these uncertainties, the ultimate resolution may result in a payment that is materially different from our current estimate of the unrecognized tax benefit liabilities. These differences will be reflected as increases or decreases to income tax expense in the period in which new information is available. Currently, we have $2,622,867 in accrued liabilities as of July 31, 2016.

 

NOTE 8 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

Commitments

 

Digerati leases its office space with monthly payments of $580; the lease is on a month to month basis. The annual rent expense under the operating lease was $7,740 and $8,715 for 2016 and 2015, respectively. The future minimum lease payment under the operating lease for fiscal year 2017 is $6,960.

 

Contingencies

 

On May 1, 2014, Recap Marketing & Consulting LLP, Rainmaker Ventures II, Ltd and WEM Equity Capital investments, Ltd. filed an arbitration claim pursuant to the Bankruptcy Settlement Agreement. On July 19, 2014, the arbitrator entered a decision that Recap Marketing & Consulting LLP was entitled to the transfer of 20,600 shares of Digerati Common Stock that were outstanding as of the date of the November Transactions and reflected on Digerati's stockholder list as being held by other stockholders who were principals of Recap Marketing & Consulting, LLP. Recap Marketing & Consulting LLP and Rainmaker Ventures II, Ltd. subsequently challenged the findings of the arbitrator by filing a motion to vacate in In Re Digerati Technologies, Inc. On November 23, 2015, the Bankruptcy Court issued an order dismissing the motion vacate.

 

From time to time Digerati is involved in various litigations in the ordinary course of business. The Company’s management believes existing litigation will not have a material adverse effect on the financial condition, results of operations or cash flows of Digerati.

 

NOTE 9 – STOCK -BASED COMPENSATION

 

In November 2015, Digerati adopted the Digerati Technologies, Inc. 2015 Equity Compensation Plan (the “Plan”). The Plan, authorizes the grant of up to 7.5 million stock options, restricted common shares, non-restricted common shares and other awards to employees, directors, and certain other persons. The Plan is intended to permit Digerati to retain and attract qualified individuals who will contribute to the overall success of Digerati. Digerati’s Board of Directors determines the terms of any grants under the Plan. Exercise prices of all stock options and other awards vary based on the market price of the shares of common stock as of the date of grant. The stock options, restricted common stock, non-restricted common stock and other awards vest based on the terms of the individual grant.

 

During the period ended July 31, 2016, we issued:

 

- 121,135 common shares to various employees as part of the Company’s profit sharing plan contribution. The Company recognized stock-based compensation expense of approximately $22,000 equivalent to the value of the shares calculated based on the share’s closing price at the grant dates.

 

As of July 31, 2016 and 2015, Digerati did not have any outstanding options under the Plan. Unamortized compensation cost totaled $0 at July 31, 2016 and July 31, 2015.

 

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NOTE 10 – WARRANTS

 

During the year ended July 31, 2015, the Company executed a stock purchase agreement with Flagship Oil and Gas Corp. for the sale of 2,279,412 shares of Digerati Common Stock, and warrants for the purchase of an additional 300,000 shares of Common Stock at $0.14 per share for five years. In consideration for the shares and the warrants, the Company received a promissory note in the original principal amount of $310,000 plus interest at the rate of 7.0% per annum, payable in installments of $40,000 plus accrued interest on January 31, 2015; $60,000 plus accrued interest on February 13, 2015; and $210,000 plus accrued interest on March 6, 2015.

 

The Black-Scholes pricing model was used to estimate the relative fair value of the 300,000 warrants issued during the period, using the assumptions of a risk free interest rate of 1.37%, dividend yield of 0%, volatility of 312%, and an expected life of 5 years. The warrants have a relative fair value of approximately $34,627 and included in additional paid-in capital.

 

A summary of the warrants as of July 31, 2016 and 2015 and the changes during the years ended July 31, 2016 and 2015 are presented below:

 

          Weighted-average    

Weighted-average
remaining contractual

 
    Warrants     exercise price     term (years)  
                   
Outstanding at July 31, 2014     -     $ -       -  
Granted     300,000       0.136       5.00  
Exercised     -       -       -  
Forfeited and cancelled     -       -       -  
Outstanding at July 31, 2015     300,000     $ 0.136       4.50  
Granted     -       -       -  
Exercised     -       -       -  
Forfeited and cancelled     -       -       -  
Outstanding at July 31, 2016     300,000     $ 0.136       3.50  
Exercisable at July 31, 2016     300,000     $ 0.136       3.50  

 

NOTE 11 – NON-STANDARDIZED PROFIT SHARING PLAN

 

We currently provide a Non-Standardized Profit Sharing Plan, adopted September 15, 2006. Under the plan our employees qualify to participate in the plan after one year of employment. Contributions under the plan are based on 25% of the annual base salary of each eligible employee up to $46,000 per year. Contributions under the plan are fully vested upon funding. During the years ended July 31, 2016 and July 31, 2015, the Company issued 121,135 and 492,356, respectively, common shares to various employees as part of the Company’s profit sharing plan contribution. The Company recognized stock-based compensation expense for July 31, 2016 and July 31, 2015 of $22,000 and $118,165, respectively, equivalent to the value of the shares calculated based on the share’s closing price at the grant dates.

 

NOTE 12 – SIGNIFICANT CUSTOMERS

 

During the year ended July 31, 2016, the Company derived a significant amount of revenue from four customers, comprising 26%, 19%, 16%, and 13% of the total revenue for the period, respectively, compared to four customers, comprising 20%, 15%, 12%, and 10% of the total revenue for the year ended July 31, 2015.

 

During the year ended July 31, 2016, the Company derived a significant amount of accounts receivable from one customer, comprising 68% of the total accounts receivable for the period, compared to one customer, comprising 75% of the total accounts receivable for the year ended July 31, 2015.

 

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NOTE 13 – RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

In November 2013, Shift8 Networks, Inc., an operating subsidiary of Digerati, entered into a note payable with Mr. Arthur L. Smith, in the amount of $46,755. The note had an implied annual interest rate of 0% and a maturity date of February 28, 2014. Subsequently, Mr. Smith agreed to extend the maturity date of the promissory note to November 30, 2014 and later agreed to extend the maturity date to April 30, 2015. On January 31, 2015, Shift8 Networks and Mr. Smith agreed to renew and extend the maturity date on the promissory note to October 31, 2015. The renewed note had an implied annual interest rate of 3%. On October 9, 2015 Shift8 Networks paid off the total outstanding principal balance and accrued interest.

 

During the year ended July 31, 2015, the Company executed a stock purchase agreement with Flagship Oil and Gas Corp. for the sale of 2,279,412 shares of Digerati Common Stock, and warrants for the purchase of an additional 300,000 shares of Common Stock at $0.14 per share for five years. In consideration for the shares and the warrants, the Company received a promissory note in the original principal amount of $310,000 plus interest at the rate of 7.0% per annum, payable in installments of $40,000 plus accrued interest on January 31, 2015; $60,000 plus accrued interest on February 13, 2015; and $210,000 plus accrued interest on March 6, 2015. The Black-Scholes pricing model was used to estimate the relative fair value of the 300,000 warrants issued during the period, using the assumptions of a risk free interest rate of 1.37%, dividend yield of 0%, volatility of 312%, and an expected life of five years. The warrants have a relative fair value of approximately $34,627 and included in additional paid-in capital. On August 14, 2015, Flagship Oil and Gas Corp. paid $36,065 to the Company for the remaining principal balance and accrued interest associated with the Flagship Notes.

 

On August 21, 2015 the Company entered into a short term promissory note payable for $25,000 with Craig K. Clement, the Company’s Chairman of the Board. The note had an implied annual interest rate of 0% and a maturity date of October 31, 2015. On October 15, 2015 the Company paid off the total outstanding principal balance.

 

NOTE 14 – PURCHASE AND SALE AGREEMENT AND JOINT OPERATING AGREEMENT   

 

On February 29, 2016 Flagship Energy Company ("Flagship"), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Digerati, entered into a Purchase and Sale Agreement (“PSA”) with a Texas-based contract-for-hire oil and gas operator (“Operator”). Under the PSA, Flagship has utilized Operator for the drilling, completion and initial operations of a shallow oil and gas well in conjunction with the purchase of 100% of Operator’s working interest and 80% of its Net Revenue Interest. Under the PSA, the Operator has agreed to transfer all field-level operations and assign 100% of a certain oil, gas and mineral lease to Flagship upon demand, which includes a tract of land located in South Texas. Additionally, Flagship entered into a Joint Operating Agreement ("JOA") with Operator, whereby the parties agree to develop the oil and gas well or wells for the production and retrieval of oil and gas commodities as provided for in the oil, gas and mineral lease.

 

NOTE 15 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

None

 

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE.

 

None

 

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES.

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

In accordance with Exchange Act Rules 13a-15 and 15a-15, we carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based on that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of July 31, 2016.

 

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Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Internal control over financial reporting is defined in Rule 13a-15(f) or 15d-15(f) promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as a process designed by, or under the supervision of, the Company’s principal executive and principal financial officers and effected by the Company’s Board, management and other personnel, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America and includes those policies and procedures that:

 

  Pertain to the maintenance of records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company;
     
  Provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and
     
  Provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

 

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. All internal control systems, no matter how well designed, have inherent limitations. Therefore, even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to financial statement preparation and presentation. Because of the inherent limitations of internal control, there is a risk that material misstatements may not be prevented or detected on a timely basis by internal control over financial reporting. However, these inherent limitations are known features of the financial reporting process. Therefore, it is possible to design into the process safeguards to reduce, though not eliminate, this risk.

 

As of July 31, 2016, management assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting based on the criteria for effective internal control over financial reporting established in Internal Control--Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission ("COSO") and SEC guidance on conducting such assessments. Based on that evaluation, management concluded that, during the period covered by this report; such internal controls and procedures were effective based on the COSO criteria.

 

As a public company with listed equity securities, we need to comply with laws, regulations and requirements, certain corporate governance provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act or the Dodd-Frank Act, and related regulations of the SEC, which we would not be required to comply with as a private company. Complying with these statutes, regulations and requirements will occupy a significant amount of time of our board of directors and management and will significantly increase our costs and expenses.

 

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION.

 

None

 

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PART III

 

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE.

 

The following table contains the name, age of our Directors and executive officers as of July 31, 2016.

 

Name   Age     Position Held   Held Office Since  
Arthur L. Smith     51     President & Chief Executive Officer     2003  
Crag K. Clement     58     Chairman of the Board (1)     2014  
Maxwell A. Polinsky     58     Director     2014  
Antonio Estrada Jr.     41     Chief Financial Officer     2007  

 

(1) Mr. Clement is the CEO of Flagship Energy Company, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Digerati.

 

Arthur L. Smith  (51) is our Chief Executive Officer, President, and Secretary. Mr. Smith has over 22 years of specialized experience in the telecommunications, technology, and oil and gas industries.  As the founder of Digerati, formerly known as ATSI Communications, Inc. (“ATSI”), he led the Company’s start-up operation focused on the USA – Mexico telecommunications corridor to over US$65 million in annual revenue and a  listing on the American Stock Exchange that resulted in a market value of over US$450 million. Between 1999 and 2009, ATSI was a three-time recipient of Deloitte and Touche's Fast 500 Award for recognition as one of the 500 fastest growing technology companies in North America.  As CEO of ATSI, Mr. Smith also co-founded the Company’s highly successful Internet software subsidiary, GlobalSCAPE, Inc., in 1996 (NYSE MKT: GSB) .  As Chairman of the Board of GlobalSCAPE, he led the Company's strategic and business development efforts from inception through its growth strategy that resulted in a listing on a public stock exchange  and the subsequent sale of ATSI’s ownership to private investors in June 2002 .  Through FY2014, Mr. Smith served as a director for the Company’s oilfield services subsidiaries, Dishon Disposal, Inc. and Hurley Enterprises, Inc. and is currently President and CEO of the Company’s cloud communications subsidiary, Shift8 Technologies, Inc.

 

Crag K. Clement (58) is our Chairman of the Board. Mr. Clement has over thirty-five years of executive and board of director experience with Technology (telecom, software, hardware) and Oil Exploration and Production (E&P) entities (Bettis, Boyle and Stovall, Buffalo Royalty, Petroleum Search, Yucca, and NASDAQ: PAN), where he was responsible for asset management, acquisitions/divestitures, strategic/tactical planning, financial operations, corporate finance, legal, transaction structuring, business development, investor relations and oversight. He assisted in the growth of a San Antonio-based telecom provider (AMEX: AI) from 10 employees to 500, achieving a public market valuation over US$450 million. He was the founding CEO of GlobalSCAPE, Inc. (NYSE MKT: GSB), the developer and owner of the popular FTP client software utility, CuteFTP TM , and was the former COO of XPEL Technologies Corp. (TSXV:DAP.U). Craig was the former Chairman of the South Texas Regional Center for Innovation and Commercialization, which screened and supported entrepreneurs through the Texas Emerging Technology Fund managed by the Texas Governor's office, which invested more than $350 million in Texas-based technology start-ups. From early 2011 through September, 2014, Craig served as a consultant to various E&P entities including Morning Star, BP, and Forge Energy (EnCap and Pine Brook – private equity sponsored). Since October of 2014, Mr. Clement has held the position of CEO for Flagship Energy Company. ( www.flagenco.com ).

 

Maxwell A. Polinsky (58) is our Director. Mr. Polinsky is currently the President and a Director of Winston Gold Mining, a Canadian-based mineral exploration company, and a principal in Venbanc Investment and Management Group Inc., an investment and merchant bank he co-founded in 1994. From 2009 to 2011, Mr. Polinsky was the Chief Financial Officer and a director of RX Exploration Inc., a company that successfully re opened the previous old historic Drumlummmon gold mine in Montana. Mr. Polinsky also served as a director of Nerium Biotechnology from 2006 to 2010, XPEL Technologies from 2003 to 2009, and Nighthawk Systems from 2001 to 2007. Mr. Polinsky holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Manitoba.

 

Antonio Estrada Jr. (41) is our Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer. Mr. Estrada is a seasoned financial executive with over 17 years of experience in the telecommunications and oil and gas industries. Mr. Estrada’s vast experience includes financial reporting and modeling, strategic planning, grant writing, and cash management. Mr. Estrada served as the Sr. VP of Finance and Corporate Controller of Digerati, formerly known as ATSI Communications, Inc., from 2008 to 2013. From 1999 to 2008, Mr. Estrada served in various roles within ATSI, including International Accounting Manager, Treasurer, Internal Auditor, and Controller. Mr. Estrada graduated from the University of Texas at San Antonio, with a Bachelors of Business Administration, with a concentration in Accounting.

 

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Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance

 

Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, requires our Directors and executive officers and persons who own more than 10% of a registered class of our equity securities to file various reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission concerning their holdings of, and transactions in, securities we issued. Each such person is required to provide us with copies of the reports filed. Based on a review of the copies of such forms furnished to us and other information, we believe that none of our officers, Directors or owners of 10% of any class of our securities failed to report transactions in our securities or reported transactions in our securities late.

 

Code of Ethics

 

We adopted an Executive Code of Ethics that applies to the Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Controller and other members of our management team. The Executive Code of Ethics may be viewed on our Website, www.digerati-inc.com. A copy of the Executive Code of Ethics will be provided without charge upon written request to Digerati Technologies, Inc., 3463 Magic Drive, Suite 355, San Antonio, Texas 78229.

 

Nominating Committee and Nomination of Directors

 

We do not have a nominating committee because the size of our Board of Directors is too small to establish separate standing committees. Our Directors perform the function of a nominating committee.

 

The Directors consider candidates recommended by other members of the Board of Directors, by executive officers and by one or more substantial, long-term stockholders. In addition, the Board of Directors may seek candidates through a third-party recruiter. Generally, stockholders who individually or as a group have held 5% of our shares for over one year will be considered substantial, long-term stockholders. In considering candidates, the Directors take into consideration the needs of the Board of Directors and the qualifications of the candidate. The Board of Directors has not established a set of criteria or minimum qualifications for candidacy and each candidate is considered based on the demonstrated competence and knowledge of the individual. To have a candidate considered by the Directors, a stockholder must submit the recommendation in writing and must include the following information:

 

The name of the stockholder and evidence of ownership of our shares, including the number of shares owned and the length of time of ownership; and

 

The name of the candidate, the candidate’s resume or a listing of her or his qualifications to be one of our Directors and the person’s consent to be named as a Director if nominated by the Directors.

 

The stockholder’s recommendation and information described above must be sent to us at 3463 Magic Drive, Suite 355, San Antonio, Texas 78229.

 

Audit Committee and Audit Committee Financial Expert

 

We do not have an audit or other committee of our Board of Directors that performs equivalent functions. Our Board of Directors performs all functions of the audit committee. Mr. Maxwell A. Polinsky served as the Audit Committee Financial Expert during the year ended July 31, 2016.

 

  32  

 

 

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION.

 

The compensation programs presently in effect with respect to the Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer and Chairman of the Board were established by the Board of Directors.

 

Arthur Smith serves as our President and Chief Executive Officer. Mr. Smith does not have a written employment agreement with the Company. Effective October 1, 2015, Mr. Smith's annual salary was approved by the Board of Directors to be set at $165,000. The Board of Directors also approved the reimbursement of monthly expenses up to $1,667. No other cash compensation is presently being paid to Mr. Smith.

 

Antonio Estrada Jr., serves as our Chief Financial Officer. Mr. Estrada does not have a written employment agreement with the Company. Effective October 1, 2015, Mr. Estrada's annual salary was approved by the Board of Directors to be set at $165,000. The Board of Directors also approved the reimbursement of monthly expenses up to $1,667. During FY2016 the Board of Directors approved an incentive bonus of $17,500 for Mr. Estrada for reaching the corporate objective of getting current with the Company's SEC filings. No other cash compensation is presently being paid to Mr. Estrada.

 

Craig K. Clement, serves as our Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and President of Flagship Energy Company, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Digerati. Mr. Clement does not have a written employment agreement with the Company. Effective October 1, 2015, Mr. Clement's annual salary was approved by the Board of Directors to be set at $195,000. No other cash compensation is presently being paid to Mr. Clement.

 

Compensation Discussion and Analysis

 

Our compensation programs are designed to meet the following objectives:

 

Offer compensation opportunities that attract highly qualified executives, reward outstanding initiative and achievement, and retain the leadership and skills necessary to build long-term stockholder value;

 

Emphasize pay-for-performance by maintaining a portion of executives’ total compensation at risk, tied to both our annual and long-term financial performance and the creation of stockholder value; and

 

Further our short and long-term strategic goals and values by aligning executive officer compensation with business objectives and individual performance.

 

Our Board of Directors believes that an executive’s compensation should be tied to the performance of the individual and the performance of the complete executive team against both financial and non-financial goals, some of which are subjective and within the discretion of the Board of Directors.

 

Our executive compensation program is intended to be simple and clear, and consists of the following elements (depending on individual performance):

 

Base salary;
     
Annual performance-based cash bonus;
     
Long-term incentives in the form of stock options; and
     
Benefits that are offered to executives on the same basis as our non-executive employees.

 

Role of Management in Determining Compensation Decisions

 

At the request of our Board of Directors, our management makes recommendations to our Board of Directors relating to executive compensation program design, specific compensation amounts, bonus targets, incentive plan structure and other executive compensation related matters for each of our executive officers, including our Chief Executive Officer. Our Board of Directors maintains decision-making authority with respect to these executive compensation matters.

 

  33  

 

 

Our Board of Directors reviews the recommendations of our management with respect to total executive compensation and each element of compensation when making pay decisions. In allocating compensation among compensation elements, we emphasize incentive, not fixed compensation to ensure that executives only receive superior pay for superior results. We equally value short- and long-term compensation because both short- and long-term results are critical to our success. In addition, our compensation program includes various benefits provided to all employees, including life insurance, health insurance and other customary benefits. The objectives and details of why each element of compensation is paid are described below.

 

Base Salary. Our objective for paying base salaries to executives is to reward them for performing the core responsibilities of their positions and to provide a level of security with respect to a portion of their compensation. We consider a number of factors when setting base salaries for executives, including:

 

Existing salary levels;
     
Competitive pay practices;
     
Individual and corporate performance; and
     
Internal equity among our executives, taking into consideration their relative contributions to our success.

 

Long-term Incentive Awards. We award long-term incentive compensation to focus our executives on our long-term growth and stockholder return, as well as to encourage our executives to remain with us for the long-term. Long-term incentive awards are primarily in the form of grants of stock options and/or stock award pursuant to our 2015 Equity Compensation Plan (the “Plan”). We selected this form because of the favorable accounting and tax treatment and the expectation of key employees in our industry that they would receive stock options and/or stock grants. We do not have pre-established target award amounts for long-term incentive grants. In determining long-term incentive awards for the Named Executive Officers, our Board of Directors relies on recommendations from our Chief Executive Officer, who considers the individual performance of the executives, the relation of the award to base salary and annual incentive compensation, and associated accounting expense. The terms of and amount of awards are made by our Board of Directors in accordance with the Stock Option Plan.

 

Executive Compensation

 

The following table sets forth the compensation paid to each of our principal executive officers (the “Named Executive Officers”) during the last two completed fiscal years:

 

SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE

 

Name and Principal Position   Year    

Salary

($)

    Bonus
($)
    Stock Awards ($) (1)     Option Awards ($)     All Other Compensation ($)    

Total

($)

 
                                           
Arthur L. Smith
President & Chief Executive Officer
   

2016

2015

   

$

$

170,002

139,473

   

$

$

      -0-

-0-

   

$

$

8,640

32,914

   

$

$

     -0-

-0-

   

$

$

         -0-

-0-

   

$

$

178,642

172,387

 
Antonio Estrada Jr.
Chief Financial Officer
   

2016

2015

   

$

$

178,775

139,473

   

$

$

-0-

-0-

     

8,640

32,914

     

-0-

-0-

     

-0-

-0-

   

$

$

187,416

172,387

 
Craig K. Clement
Chairman of the Board (2)
   

2016

2015

   

$

$

179,504

-0-

   

$

$

-0-

-0-

   

$

$

-0-

-0-

   

$

$

-0-

-0-

   

$

$

-0-

-0-

   

$

$

179,504

-0-

 

 

(1) During the year ended July 31, 2015 and 2016, the Digerati issued common shares as part of the Company’s profit sharing plan contribution.
(2) Mr. Clement is the CEO of Flagship Energy Company, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Digerati.

 

  34  

 

 

Our Board of Directors adopted the 2015 Equity Compensation Plan (the “Plan”). Under the Plan the Board of Directors may grant up to 7.5 million shares of our common stock to our officers, Directors, employees and consultants. Grants may be in the form of incentive stock options, non-statutory stock options, restricted stock awards, and/or unrestricted stock awards. The number and terms of each award is determined by the Board of Directors, subject to the limitation that the exercise price of any option may not be less than the fair market value of the common stock on the date of grant.

 

We currently provide a Non-Standardized Profit Sharing Plan (the “Profit Sharing Plan”). The Board of Directors approved the Profit Sharing Plan on September 15, 2006. Under the Profit Sharing Plan our employees qualified to participate in the Profit Sharing Plan after one year of employment. Contribution under the Profit Sharing Plan by us is based on 25% of the annual base salary of each eligible employee up to $46,000 per year. Contributions under the Profit Sharing Plan are fully vested upon funding.

 

OUTSTANDING EQUITY AWARDS AS OF JULY 31, 2016 (1)

 

    Option Awards   Stock Awards
Name    

Number of Securities Underlying Unexercised Options

(#)

Exercisable

     

Number of Securities Underlying Unexercised Options

(#)

Unexercisable

     

Option Exercise Price

($)

      Option Expiration Date      

Number of Shares or Units of Stock That Have Not Vested

(#)

     

Market Value of Shares or Units of Stock That Have Not Vested

($)

 
                                                 
Arthur L. Smith     -       -       -       -       -       -  
Antonio Estrada Jr.     -       -       -       -       -       -  
Craig K. Clement     -       -       -       -       -       -  

 

1) As of July 31, 2016, Digerati did not have any outstanding options.

 

Compensation of Directors

 

Each Director that is not an officer is reimbursed the reasonable out-of-pocket expenses in connection with their travel to attend meetings of the Board of Directors. Each Director that is not an officer was paid $1,000 per month.

 

Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation

 

We do not have a compensation committee of our Board of Directors or other committee that performs the same functions. Mr. Arthur L. Smith is presently our Chief Executive Officer and participates in deliberations concerning executive compensation.

 

Compensation Committee Report

 

Our Board of Directors reviewed and discussed the Compensation Discussion and Analysis with management and, based on such discussion, included the Compensation Discussion and Analysis in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

  35  

 

 

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS.

 

Information regarding securities authorized to be issued under equity compensation plans is set forth under Item 5 Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

 

The following table lists the beneficial ownership of shares of our Common Stock by (i) each person known to own more than 5% of our outstanding voting securities, (ii) each Director and nominee, (iii) the Named Executive Officers and (iv) all Directors and officers as a group. Information with respect to officers, Directors and their families is as of July 31, 2016 and is based on our books and records and information obtained from each individual. Information with respect to other stockholders is based upon the Schedule 13D or Schedule 13G filed by such stockholders with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Unless otherwise stated, the business address of each individual or group is the same as the address of our principal executive office and all securities are beneficially owned solely by the person indicated .

 

NAME OF   COMMON     % OF  
INDIVIDUAL OR GROUP   STOCK     CLASS (1)  
             
INDIVIDUAL OFFICERS,      
DIRECTORS AND NOMINEES      
             
Arthur L. Smith     231,080       4.41 %
President, Chief Executive Officer                
Director                
                 
Antonio Estrada Jr.     233,580       4.46 %
Chief Financial Officer                
                 
Craig k. Clement     2,643,048 (2)     50.50 %
Chairman of the Board (3)                
                 
Maxwell A. Polinsky     4,400       0.08 %
Director                
                 
ALL OFFICERS AND                
DIRECTORS AS A GROUP     3,112,108       59.45 %

 

(1) Based upon 5,234,165 shares of common stock outstanding as of July 31, 2016.
(2) Indirect beneficial ownership through Flagship Oil and Gas Corp.
(3) Mr. Clement is the CEO of Flagship Energy Company, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Digerati.

 

  36  

 

 

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE.

 

For a director to be considered independent according to the standards set forth in Section 303A.02 of the New York Stock Exchange Listed Company Manual (the “NYSE Manual”), the Board of Directors must affirmatively determine that the director has no material relationship with Digerati, either directly or as a partner, shareholder or officer of an organization that has a relationship with Digerati. In addition, the NYSE Manual provides that a director will not be considered independent if, within the preceding three years, the director or an immediate family member (i) was an employee of Digerati, (ii) received more than $120,000 per year in direct compensation from Digerati, (iii) is affiliated with or employed by a present or former internal or external auditor of Digerati, (iv) employed as an executive officer of another company for which an executive officer of Digerati serves on the compensation committee or (v) is an executive officer or employee that makes payments to or receives payments from Digerati of more than $1,000,000 or two percent of such other company’s gross revenues.

 

The Board has determined that Mr. Maxwell A. Polinsky satisfies the independence requirements in the NYSE Manual. In making the determination of director independence with respect to Mr. Crag K. Clement, the Board of Directors considered that the indirect beneficial ownership through Flagship Oil and Gas Corp., of 50.50% of our outstanding Common Stock and determined that Mr. Clement did not meet the requirements to be considered independent.

 

In November 2013, Shift8 Networks, Inc., an operating subsidiary of Digerati, entered into a note payable with Mr. Arthur L. Smith, in the amount of $46,755. The note had an implied annual interest rate of 0% and a maturity date of February 28, 2014. Subsequently, Mr. Smith agreed to extend the maturity date of the promissory note to November 30, 2014 and later agreed to extend the maturity date to April 30, 2015. On January 31, 2015, Shift8 Networks and Mr. Smith agreed to renew and extend the maturity date on the promissory note to October 31, 2015. The renewed note had an implied annual interest rate of 3%. On October 9, 2015 Shift8 Networks paid off the total outstanding principal balance and accrued interest.

 

During the year ended July 31, 2015, the Company executed a stock purchase agreement with Flagship Oil and Gas Corp. for the sale of 2,279,412 shares of Digerati Common Stock, and warrants for the purchase of an additional 300,000 shares of Common Stock at $0.14 per share for five years. In consideration for the shares and the warrants, the Company received a promissory note in the original principal amount of $310,000 plus interest at the rate of 7.0% per annum, payable in installments of $40,000 plus accrued interest on January 31, 2015; $60,000 plus accrued interest on February 13, 2015; and $210,000 plus accrued interest on March 6, 2015. The Black-Scholes pricing model was used to estimate the relative fair value of the 300,000 warrants issued during the period, using the assumptions of a risk free interest rate of 1.37%, dividend yield of 0%, volatility of 312%, and an expected life of five years. The warrants have a relative fair value of approximately $34,627 and included in additional paid-in capital. On August 14, 2015, Flagship Oil and Gas Corp. paid $36,065 to the Company for the remaining principal balance and accrued interest associated with the Flagship Notes.

 

On August 21, 2015 the Company entered into a short term promissory note payable for $25,000 with Craig K. Clement, the Company’s Chairman of the Board. The note had an implied annual interest rate of 0% and a maturity date of October 31, 2015. On October 15, 2015 the Company paid off the total outstanding principal balance.

 

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES.

 

The following table sets forth the aggregate fees paid to LBB & Associates Ltd., LLP during 2016 and 2015 for audit services rendered in connection with the audits and reviews of our consolidated financial statements.

 

Description of Fees   2016     2015  
             
Audit Fees   $ 9,900     $ 36,150  
Audit Related Fees     -0-       -0-  
Tax fees     -0-       -0-  
All Other Fees     -0-       -0-  

 

During the years ended July 31, 2016 and 2015, the Company paid $9,080 and $14,780, respectively to MiddletonRainesZapata, LLP for tax work related to the consolidated tax returns.

 

Pre-Approval of Audit and Non-Audit Services

 

The Board of Directors considered whether the non-audit services provided by LBB & Associates Ltd., LLP are compatible with maintaining their independence. Prior to engagement of an independent accounting firm for the next year’s audit, the Board of Directors is asked to pre-approve the engagement of the independent accounting firm, and the projected fees for audit services and audit-related services that we will incur. The fee amounts approved for the audit and audit-related services are updated to the extent necessary at meetings of the Board of Directors during the year. In the 2016 fiscal year, ther e were no fees paid to LBB & Associates Ltd., LLP under a de minimis exception to the rules that waives pre-approval for certain non-audit services.

 

  37  

 

 

PART IV

 

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES.

 

The following documents are exhibits to this report.

 

Number     Description
2.1     Agreed Order Confirming Joint Plan of Reorganization filed by Plan Proponents. (field as Exhibit 2.1 to Form 8-K filed on April 11, 2014)
2.2     Plan Proponents’ Joint Chapter 11 Plan of Reorganization as Modified on the Record on April 4, 2014. (field as Exhibit 2.2 to Form 8-K filed on April 11, 2014)
2.3     Plan Supplement Naming Independent Director in Connection With Plan Proponents’ Joint Chapter 11 Plan of Reorganization. (field as Exhibit 2.3 to Form 8-K filed on April 11, 2014)
2.4     Disclosure Statement Under 11 U.S.C. § 1125 and Bankruptcy Rule 3016 in Support of Plan Proponents’ Joint Chapter 11 Plan of Reorganization. (filed as Exhibit 2.4 to Form 8-K filed on April 11, 2014)
2.5     Bankruptcy Settlement Agreement dated January 15, 2014. (field as Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed on January 23, 2014)
2.6     Order Authorizing the Sale of 100% Equity Interests of Dishon Disposal, Inc. and Granting Related Relief approving the Stock Purchase Agreement dated June 27, 2014 . (filed as Exhibit 2.6 to Form 8-K filed on July 7, 2014)
2.7     Order Authorizing the Sale of 100% Equity Interests of Hurley Enterprises, Inc. and Granting Related Relief approving the Stock Purchase Agreement dated June 26, 2014.(field as   Exhibit 2.7 to Form 8-K filed on July 24, 2014)
3.1     Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation. (filed as Exhibit 3.1 to Form 8-K filed on April 11, 2014)
3.2     Amended and Restated Bylaws. (filed as Exhibit 3.2 to Form 8-KA filed on April 25, 2014)      
3.3     Second Amended and Restated Bylaws, effective as of January 13, 2015 (filed as Exhibit 3.1 to Form 8-K filed on January 21, 2015 (File No. 001-15687)).      
10.1     Bankruptcy Settlement Agreement dated January 15, 2014 . (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed on January 23, 2014)      
10.2     Promissory note payable with Arthur L. Smith dated November 15, 2013 in the     principal amount of $46,755 (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to Form 10-Q filed on January 20, 2015 (File No. 001-15687)).      
10.3     Promissory Note dated October 31, 2014 in the original principal amount of $10,000.00 plus interest at the rate of 7.0% per annum due January 5, 2015 (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to  Form 8-K filed on January 21, 2015 (File No. 001-15687)).      
10.4     Promissory Note dated November 7, 2014 in the original principal amount of $10,000.00 plus interest at the rate of 7.0% per annum due January 5, 2015 (filed as Exhibit 10.2 to Form 8-K filed on January 21, 2015 (File No. 001-15687)).      
10.5     Promissory Note dated November 14, 2014 in the original principal amount of $10,000.00 plus interest at the rate of 7.0% per annum due January 5, 2015 (filed as Exhibit 10.3 to Form 8-K filed on January 21, 2015 (File No. 001-15687)).      
10.6     Promissory Note dated November 24, 2014 in the original principal amount of $10,000.00 plus interest at the rate of 7.0% per annum due January 5, 2015 (filed as Exhibit 10.4 to Form 8-K filed on January 21, 2015 (File No. 001-15687)).      

 

  38  

 

 

10.7     Promissory Note dated January 19, 2015 in the original principal amount of $310,000.00 plus interest at the rate of 7.0% per annum, payable in installments (filed as Exhibit 10.5 to Form 8-K filed on January 21, 2015 (File No. 001-15687)).      
10.8     Stock Purchase Agreement dated January 13, 2015, by and among Digerati Technologies, Inc. and Flagship Oil and Gas Corp. (filed as Exhibit 10.6 to Form 8-K filed on January 21, 2015 (File No. 001-15687)).      
10.9     Form of stock award agreement under the Company's 2005 Stock Compensation Plan for grants to qualifying employees' 401K Retirement Accounts (filed as Exhibit 10.7 to Form 8-K filed on January 21, 2015 (File No. 001-15687)).
10.10     Renewal and Extension Promissory Note payable with Arthur L. Smith dated January 31, 2015 in the principal amount of $46,755 plus interest at the rate of 3.0% per annum due October 31, 2015. (filed as Exhibit 10.9 to Form 10-Q filed on February 20, 2015 (File No. 001-15687)).
10.11     Promissory Note payable with Craig K. Clement dated August 21, 2015 in the original principal amount of $25,000 plus interest at the rate of 0% per annum due October 31, 2015. (filed as Exhibit 10.10 to the Form 10-Q filed on November 25, 2015 (File No. 001-15687)).  
10.12     2015 Equity Compensation Plan (filed as Exhibit 4.1 to Form S-8 filed on November 18, 2015 (File No. 001-15687)).
21.1     Subsidiary List.
31.1     Certification of our President and Chief Executive Officer, under Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
31.2     Certification of our Chief Financial Officer, under Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
32.1     Certification of our President and Chief Executive Officer, under Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
32.2     Certification of our Chief Financial Officer, under Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

  DIGERATI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
     
Date:  October 27, 2016 By: /s/ Arthur L. Smith
    Arthur L. Smith
    President and
  Chief Executive Officer

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacity and on the dates indicated.

 

Signature   Title   Date
         
/s/ Arthur L. Smith   Principal Executive Officer   October 27, 2016
Arthur L. Smith        
         
/s/ Antonio Estrada Jr.   Principal Accounting Officer   October 27, 2016
Antonio Estrada Jr.   Principal Finance Officer    
         
/s/ Craig K. Clement   Director   October 27, 2016
Craig K. Clement        
         
/s/ Maxwell A. Polinsky   Director   October 27, 2016
Maxwell A. Polinsky        

 

  40  

 

 

EXHIBIT INDEX

 

Number   Description
21.1   Subsidiary List  
31.1   Certification of our President and Chief Executive Officer, under Section 302 of the Sarbanes -Oxley Act of 2002.  
31.2   Certification of our Chief Financial Officer, under Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.  
32.1   Certification of our President and Chief Executive Officer, under Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.  
32.2   Certification of our Chief Financial Officer, under Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.  

 

 

41

 

 

EXHIBIT 21.1

 

Digerati Technologies, Inc. Subsidiary List

 

1. Digerati Networks, Inc.
2. Shift8 Technologies, Inc.
3. Shift8 Networks, Inc.
4. Flagship Energy Company

 

EXHIBIT 31.1

CERTIFICATION

 

I, Arthur L. Smith, certify that:

 

1. I have reviewed this Annual Report on Form 10-K of Digerati Technologies, Inc., a Nevada Corporation;

 

2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

 

3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

 

4. The registrant’s other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:

 

(a)    Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

 

(b)    Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

 

(c)    Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and

 

(d)    Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

 

5. The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):

 

(a)       All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

 

(b)       Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

October 27, 2016 /s/ Arthur L. Smith
  Arthur L. Smith
  President and Chief Executive Officer

 

EXHIBIT 31.2

CERTIFICATION

 

I, Antonio Estrada, Jr., certify that:

 

1. I have reviewed this Annual Report on Form 10-K of Digerati Technologies, Inc., a Nevada Corporation;

 

2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

 

3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

 

4. The registrant’s other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:

 

(a)    Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

 

(b)    Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

 

(c)    Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and

 

(d)    Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

 

5. The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):

 

(a)        All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

 

(b)        Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

October 27, 2016 /s/ Antonio Estrada, Jr.
  Antonio Estrada, Jr.
  Chief Financial Officer

 

E XHIBIT 32.1

 

CERTIFICATION OF PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

PURSUANT TO 18 U.S.C. ss. 1350, AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

 

In connection with the Annual Report (the "Report") of Digerati Technologies, Inc. (the "Company") on Form 10-K for the period ending July 31, 2016, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on the date hereof, I, Arthur L. Smith, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Company, certify, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. ss. 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that,

 

1) the Report fully complies with the requirements of section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and
   
2) the information in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and result of operations of the Company.

 

By /s/ Arthur L. Smith  
  Arthur L. Smith  
  President and  
  Chief Executive Officer  
  October 27, 2016  

 

EXHIBIT 32.2

 

CERTIFICATION OF THE chief FINANCIAL OFFICER

PURSUANT TO 18 U.S.C. ss. 1350, AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

 

In connection with the Annual Report (the "Report") of Digerati Technologies, Inc. (the "Company") on Form 10-K for the period ending July 31, 2016, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on the date hereof, I, Antonio Estrada Jr., the Chief Financial Officer of the Company, certify, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. ss. 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002,

1) the Report fully complies with the requirements of section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and
   
2) the information in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and result of operations of the Company.
By /s/ Antonio Estrada Jr.  
  Antonio Estrada Jr.  
  Chief Financial Officer  
  October 27, 2016